Recommended Posts

BP and Shell Call on Texas to End Routine Flaring

 

 

(Bloomberg) -- Two of Europe’s biggest oil companies urged Texas regulators to end the routine flaring of natural gas, joining with large investors who want greater oversight of the harmful environmental practice.

BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc are calling for tougher rules than those proposed by the Railroad Commission of Texas, which regulates oil and gas in the state. The commission is considering requiring operators to disclose more data when they apply for flaring permits and issuing them for shorter periods.

“We believe there is a real opportunity for the state to set the bar for others to follow,” BP and Shell said in a joint letter to the regulator dated Sept. 4 and published late Wednesday. “We encourage the Railroad Commission of Texas to support an ambition of zero routine flaring in Texas.”

Last week, investors managing more than $2 trillion asked the commission to end routine gas flaring by 2025. AllianceBernstein, California State Teachers’ Retirement System and Legal & General Investment Management said the actions of leading operators “demonstrate the financial and technical viability” of their proposal.

The boom in shale production over the past decade has led to a massive excess of natural gas, which is often a by-product of oil in some basins such as the Permian. Prices for gas are often so low that it’s cheaper for operators to burn it, releasing carbon dioxide and sometimes methane, rather than pay for pipelines to take it to market.

Routine flaring refers to the burning of gas during normal operations. Most operators and regulators also reserve the right to flare during emergency situations.

The business-friendly commission has historically taken a hands-off approach to flaring, granting permits and waivers when needed, but that may soon change with increasing pushback from environmentalists, investors and some oil companies.

In their letter, BP and Shell didn’t set a date for ending routine flaring but called for improvements from operators, improved flaring data, more oversight and collaboration with pipeline operators.

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

On 9/11/2020 at 8:37 AM, ceo_energemsier said:

BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell Plc are calling for tougher rules than those proposed by the Railroad Commission of Texas, which regulates oil and gas in the state.

Two of the biggest polluters in the oil world telling TRRC to go zero flaring? Kick em outta of the state, damn foreigners !!

20200908_134925.jpg

Edited by Old-Ruffneck
added photo
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

Two of the biggest polluters in the oil world telling TRRC to go zero flaring? Kick em outta of the state, damn foreigners !!

20200908_134925.jpg

 

 

Dust off the old BP book, and remember when they re-branded themselves as BP= Beyond Petroleum and that failed so they came back to petroleum?

Shell and BP both UK based , caving under pressure from eco-terrorists, trying to show a better image of themselves with smoke and mirrors, writing down/claiming to leave assets in the ground.

Hypocrites!

Why dont the two of them show individual corporate responsibility and put forth procedures and technologies deployment to end flaring?!!!!

  • Great Response! 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

Where this well is, approximately 20 miles s.e. Pecos, Tx and if i took a panoramic photo you'd see no less than 10 other wells with varying size flares and not a pipeline within 15 miles at least. Pipeline companies no want that noxious crap in their lines anyway....burn it off is less harmful than discharging straight outta the well. 

BP and Shell both have wells with flares here in West Texas. Having worked on drilling rig in 80 for Shell i can tell you their ethics are crap. BP we already have seen their results....2019 testing of shell-fish show to still have high toxic levels of the dispersants used. 

  • Like 1
  • Great Response! 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.