Dan Warnick

U.S. Presidential Elections Status - Electoral Votes

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18 hours ago, Strangelovesurfing said:

Wow... boy is this going to fuel the theories.

https://nypost.com/2021/01/27/proud-boys-enrique-tarrio-worked-as-informant-for-cops-report/

"Tarrio was later arrested for allegedly burning a Black Lives Matter banner swiped from a historically black church. He was also charged with possessing two high-capacity rifle magazines."

That's magazines not rifles, this guy's fishy as a 3 dollar bill.

And according to the article, he was at the capital but was not charged with anything, but others that had been with him were.  Hmm.  Could still be on the payroll?

But otherwise, what did anyone expect.  Lilly white southern boy that goes to church every Sunday with his mommy?  The group's name is "Proud Boys" and they say they are proud of their heritage, and the accomplishments of their forefathers.  And they are willing to proclaim that as loud and in your face as any other "Proud" group.

I wouldn't hang around with him or others that want to.  They are not afraid of trouble, to say the least, and appear to be in quite a bit of it themselves.

 

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3 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

And according to the article, he was at the capital but was not charged with anything, but others that had been with him were.  Hmm.  Could still be on the payroll?

But otherwise, what did anyone expect.  Lilly white southern boy that goes to church every Sunday with his mommy?  The group's name is "Proud Boys" and they say they are proud of their heritage, and the accomplishments of their forefathers.  And they are willing to proclaim that as loud and in your face as any other "Proud" group.

I wouldn't hang around with him or others that want to.  They are not afraid of trouble, to say the least, and appear to be in quite a bit of it themselves.

 

Some of his story is just too convenient. Notice how he does things that bring notoriety (burning the banner) along with getting a weapons charge without a real weapon present (magazine vs a complete firearm). It feels designed to burnish his credibility with anti-government types.

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3 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

His mom revealed her son has not eaten since his arrest Saturday because the jail where he is being held does not offer organic food

🤣🤣

Someone better speak with the manager!

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19 hours ago, Boat said:

We have two lawsuits

Three, counting this one.

https://www.cpr.org/2020/12/22/trump-campaign-and-others-sued-for-defamation-for-spreading-election-fraud-conspiracies/

“Several days after the election Oltmann said that he’d infiltrated an earlier call with Denver-area “Antifa” members and heard a man identified as “Eric from Dominion” say he would make sure Trump wouldn’t win the election. According to Oltmann, the man said, “don't worry about the election. Trump is not going to win. I made effing sure of that.”

Oltmann has never provided a recording of that call, but the allegation spread rapidly through right-wing social media, making its way to pro-Trump media outlets that are now included in the lawsuit.

Coomer said that conversation never took place and he has no association with left-wing groups. 

"I have a personal political opinion. I may share that with friends and family, but I have never participated, or belonged to, any political groups, political action groups, social justice groups. I do not donate to political campaigns. I don't donate to any PACS or anything like that,” he told CPR News.”

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GOP group launches billboard campaign urging Cruz, Hawley to resign

By Max Greenwood - 01/29/21 09:52 AM EST

An anti-Trump Republican group is launching a seven-figure billboard campaign calling on a dozen GOP lawmakers to resign in the wake of the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol. 

The billboard advertisements from the Republican Accountability Project, a group formed earlier this month by GOP critics of former President Trump, target 10 members of the House and two senators, Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), who voted against certifying the Electoral College vote this month after a mob of Trump’s supporters violently stormed the Capitol.

"You lied about the election. The Capitol was attacked. Sen. Cruz: Resign,” one billboard targeting Cruz reads. Cruz was among the most prominent Republican lawmakers who helped spread Trump’s false claims of voter fraud and electoral malfeasance after his loss to President Biden in November.

The billboard campaign comes with a price tag of $1 million, according to the Republican Accountability Project. The group has already committed to raising $50 million to help reelect GOP lawmakers who vote to impeach or convict Trump for inciting the Jan. 6 insurrection.

Other lawmakers targeted by the campaign include House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy (R-Calif.), Rep. Devin Nunes (R-Calif.), Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) and Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Ga.), who this week has been criticized by Republicans and Democrats alike for a series of controversies, including past comments calling for violence against Democratic politicians.

The Republican Accountability Project is also going up on the air in each of their targets’ congressional districts and states with television ads tying the lawmakers’ rhetoric with the actions of the pro-Trump rioters behind the breach at the Capitol. 

Those ads will air during Fox News’s “Fox & Friends” and “Hannity,” two favorite news programs of conservatives, the group said.

“These representatives and senators helped incite the attack on the Capitol by spreading lies about the election,” said Sarah Longwell, the executive director of the Republican Accountability Project. “They have proved that they are unfit to hold office. They should be nowhere near power.”

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@Ward Smith et al:

I am going to post the attached video made at a polling station, where the demo people selected a Diebold machine at random and, at start-up, loaded a hacked start-up memory card.  The poll workers inserted eight ballots on a test run, six were No ballots and two were Yes ballots.  The machine then totalled the votes and displayed one No ballot and Seven Yes ballots. 

What this demonstrates is that access to that start-up memory card is disastrous.   

I am not going to comment further on whether any of this actually took place in the last election.  Nobody is going to know unless those memory cards can be collected and examined by programmer experts.  And at this point that is not going to happen.  What it does demonstrate is that access to those cards allows a miscreant to alter them, which apparently is child's play to a serious programmer.  The fellow here did it in a few minutes.  So the weakness in the machines is at their initiation sequence, or "start-up." 

This technology has an Achilles Heel.  And that is why you have to stick with a manual counting system, i.e. paper ballots, that are scrupulously stored under lock and key and armed guards.  Anything less, and your election is, potentially, open to penetration and alteration. 

I know that this is going to make folks quite uncomfortable.  It assuredly has dramatically altered my own perception of the matter. I refuse to speculate on whether or not this, or any of this, actually took place.  The bigger problem is that it undermines the confidence of the public in the vote and the voting process.  So, I conclude that paper is best. 

And remember, I am not a voter, not a citizen, and I refuse to pick sides.  I remain a committed Monarchist.  That said, I no longer have any confidence in electronic voting machines.  the proof of hacking capability is right before your eyes. 

 

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1 hour ago, Jan van Eck said:

@Ward Smith et al:

I am going to post the attached video made at a polling station, where the demo people selected a Diebold machine at random and, at start-up, loaded a hacked start-up memory card.  The poll workers inserted eight ballots on a test run, six were No ballots and two were Yes ballots.  The machine then totalled the votes and displayed one No ballot and Seven Yes ballots. 

What this demonstrates is that access to that start-up memory card is disastrous.   

I am not going to comment further on whether any of this actually took place in the last election.  Nobody is going to know unless those memory cards can be collected and examined by programmer experts.  And at this point that is not going to happen.  What it does demonstrate is that access to those cards allows a miscreant to alter them, which apparently is child's play to a serious programmer.  The fellow here did it in a few minutes.  So the weakness in the machines is at their initiation sequence, or "start-up." 

This technology has an Achilles Heel.  And that is why you have to stick with a manual counting system, i.e. paper ballots, that are scrupulously stored under lock and key and armed guards.  Anything less, and your election is, potentially, open to penetration and alteration. 

I know that this is going to make folks quite uncomfortable.  It assuredly has dramatically altered my own perception of the matter. I refuse to speculate on whether or not this, or any of this, actually took place.  The bigger problem is that it undermines the confidence of the public in the vote and the voting process.  So, I conclude that paper is best. 

And remember, I am not a voter, not a citizen, and I refuse to pick sides.  I remain a committed Monarchist.  That said, I no longer have any confidence in electronic voting machines.  the proof of hacking capability is right before your eyes. 

 

I have seen this video before, memory manipulating software. Humanity can be and is a real piece of work. 

Between software and hardware manipulation it would be almost impossible to catch any type of fraud.

To date the state's in question have stated audits have been preformed and deemed reliable. They are correct in that statement garbage in and garbage out will always balance.

The only way to audit this election would be the voter roles themselves. Taking the garbage out of this election. If indeed there is any.

The use of computers allows anyone to see the trends instantly, and to that end one can instantly change the results of such trends instantly  on a massive scale...within seconds.

I believe we saw that being played out on the televised reflection results, massive voter swings took place. The irony here was the fact that no one anticipated the counts would be displayed while the corrections were being made. Do not believe your Lieing eyes comes to mind.

It is almost stunning, so much so I still have a hard time grasping the magnitude of it. Yet with a well designed software and a network of computers it would take only seconds.

So many opinions and so little time, and that time has come and gone. Someday very quietly these voter roles will be purged and we will never know.

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I have seen this before too, but thanks for posting it--I didn't know how. It is riveting. 

I don't think there is a computer-like device made that can't be made to change the vote. It's just technology and there are a lot of hotshot programmers and hackers all over the world, these days.

I keep harking back to the old Diebold system, which Texas used (and for which they were roundly criticized). Diebold was apparently bought out by Dominion and created in like image. Dominion thought Texas would be a ready and willing big customer. However, the Texas Voting Commission looked at that system on three different occasions, each time coming up with the forensic analysis that it was subject to nefarious tinkering . . . even remotely. That well-established forensic data, performed "before the fact ," was the reason Attorney General Ken Paxton thought he had a bulletproof case to take to the Supreme Court--an unusual tactic for unusual times.

Like you say, Jan, hand-voting is the only honest, transparent form of expressing the will of the people to the Electoral College. 

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13 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

The Shaman, or whatever the medical/psychiatric doctors would call him, is quite a piece of work.  Sounds like he was a pretty good guy, at some point.  My favorite part of the article is where he makes a court appearance, and later says this

'I'm not really all that worried about it because, in all honesty...I didn't break any laws. I walked through open doors.'

Jailed 'QAnon shaman' who stormed the Capitol wearing a fur headdress with horns was KICKED OUT of the Navy for refusing to receive an anthrax vaccine 15 years ago

Jailed 'QAnon shaman' who stormed the Capitol wearing a fur headdress with horns was KICKED OUT of the Navy for refusing to receive an anthrax vaccine 15 years ago

  • 'QAnon shaman' Jacob Anthony Chansley, 33, was kicked out of the Navy in 2007 for refusing to take the anthrax vaccine, according to a new report
  • Chansley is one of the MAGA rioters who turned himself in to the FBI for his part in storming the Capitol building last Wednesday 
  • He enlisted in the Navy in 2005 and was assigned to the USS Kitty Hawk then a Transient Personnel Unit in Puget Sound  
  • He was charged with violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds 
  • He has been living with his mother Martha, 56, since January 2019 
  • His mom revealed her son has not eaten since his arrest Saturday because the jail where he is being held does not offer organic food
  • Chansley has repeatedly turned up to protests across Arizona in recent months 

Lives in mommy's basement - check

Went to BLM rallies - check

MAGA supporter - TILT

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7 hours ago, notsonice said:

The billboard advertisements from the Republican Accountability Project, a group formed earlier this month by GOP critics of former President Trump, target 10 members of the House and two senators, Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Josh Hawley (R-Mo.), who voted against certifying the Electoral College vote this month after a mob of Trump’s supporters violently stormed the Capitol.

This is laughable. The main reason for this is that Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley are the new faces of the Republican Party. Mr. Cruz is not particularly likable and while articulate is not fluid and composed while telling his thoughts. But Mr. Hawley is just about everything the Republican Party needs. He seems sincere, is charismatic, appears to be unflappable, and tells the truth straightforwardly. 

The Deep State portion of the Grand Old Party is old money--much of it made (swiped) while they were in office--and also old thoughts, generally of the nature belonging to old people. These people--the Bushes, Dick Cheney, Rumsfeld, Colin Powell, Mitt Romney--were gobsmacked by the brash nature of President Trump. They wanted him out and did much more than the Democrats to see that he was voted out--by hook or by crook. These people don't seem to realize just how angry a lot of people are. They're living in the past. 

Their efforts will do more to catapult Josh Hawley into the catbird seat as a frontrunner candidate for the presidency than any other. We need young blood in the Republican Party. I think that Mr. Hawley has the potential to pick up the gauntlet. He just has to keep his nose clean and continue to learn history and geopolitical influence. 

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3 hours ago, Gerry Maddoux said:

This is laughable. The main reason for this is that Ted Cruz and Josh Hawley are the new faces of the Republican Party. Mr. Cruz is not particularly likable and while articulate is not fluid and composed while telling his thoughts. But Mr. Hawley is just about everything the Republican Party needs. He seems sincere, is charismatic, appears to be unflappable, and tells the truth straightforwardly. 

The Deep State portion of the Grand Old Party is old money--much of it made (swiped) while they were in office--and also old thoughts, generally of the nature belonging to old people. These people--the Bushes, Dick Cheney, Rumsfeld, Colin Powell, Mitt Romney--were gobsmacked by the brash nature of President Trump. They wanted him out and did much more than the Democrats to see that he was voted out--by hook or by crook. These people don't seem to realize just how angry a lot of people are. They're living in the past. 

Their efforts will do more to catapult Josh Hawley into the catbird seat as a frontrunner candidate for the presidency than any other. We need young blood in the Republican Party. I think that Mr. Hawley has the potential to pick up the gauntlet. He just has to keep his nose clean and continue to learn history and geopolitical influence. 

AOC and her ilk absolutely abhor these guys, so that should help them as well.

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20 hours ago, Ward Smith said:

 

 I've posted a hundred pages of proof of election fraud.

Hundred of pages of wrong and still going. 

Do you even live in a swing state?

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58 minutes ago, Symmetry said:

Hundred of pages of wrong and still going. 

Do you even live in a swing state?

Just a few posts above, and you still missed it?

 

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10 hours ago, Jan van Eck said:

@Ward Smith et al:

I am going to post the attached video made at a polling station, where the demo people selected a Diebold machine at random and, at start-up, loaded a hacked start-up memory card.  The poll workers inserted eight ballots on a test run, six were No ballots and two were Yes ballots.  The machine then totalled the votes and displayed one No ballot and Seven Yes ballots. 

What this demonstrates is that access to that start-up memory card is disastrous.   

I am not going to comment further on whether any of this actually took place in the last election.  Nobody is going to know unless those memory cards can be collected and examined by programmer experts.  And at this point that is not going to happen.  What it does demonstrate is that access to those cards allows a miscreant to alter them, which apparently is child's play to a serious programmer.  The fellow here did it in a few minutes.  So the weakness in the machines is at their initiation sequence, or "start-up." 

This technology has an Achilles Heel.  And that is why you have to stick with a manual counting system, i.e. paper ballots, that are scrupulously stored under lock and key and armed guards.  Anything less, and your election is, potentially, open to penetration and alteration. 

I know that this is going to make folks quite uncomfortable.  It assuredly has dramatically altered my own perception of the matter. I refuse to speculate on whether or not this, or any of this, actually took place.  The bigger problem is that it undermines the confidence of the public in the vote and the voting process.  So, I conclude that paper is best. 

And remember, I am not a voter, not a citizen, and I refuse to pick sides.  I remain a committed Monarchist.  That said, I no longer have any confidence in electronic voting machines.  the proof of hacking capability is right before your eyes. 

 

Lest anyone forget, @0R0 documented all this and @Ward Smith, myself and others kept showing the evidence and the case that was being made by Sidney and Rudy and hundreds of lawyers and investigators.  The one true evidence of the actual votes, the paper ballots, were being shredded within days and in some cases hours of being "counted" by the machines.  Proof that the machines are capable of going online during the process was shown, etc. etc. etc. 

One person, one vote.  Verifiable by looking at the piece of paper the voter marked their choice on, and stored for 2 years minimum after the election.  The only security that is needed for paper ballots, as far as I can tell, is fireproof storage and security against theft.

Two people counting the same stacks: one Republican, one Democrat.  As someone suggested earlier, and the same as is done in every bar and restaurant every single day, their tallies match up at the end of the day or nobody goes home until the problem is found.

This is not rocket science, some would say, but I say this is a case where rocket science is better left to rockets, not vote counting.  Paper ballots and hand counting.

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2 minutes ago, Dan Warnick said:

Lest anyone forget, @0R0 documented all this and @Ward Smith, myself and others kept showing the evidence and the case that was being made by Sidney and Rudy and hundreds of lawyers and investigators.  The one true evidence of the actual votes, the paper ballots, were being shredded within days and in some cases hours of being "counted" by the machines.  Proof that the machines are capable of going online during the process was shown, etc. etc. etc. 

One person, one vote.  Verifiable by looking at the piece of paper the voter marked their choice on, and stored for 2 years minimum after the election.  The only security that is needed for paper ballots, as far as I can tell, is fireproof storage and security against theft.

Two people counting the same stacks: one Republican, one Democrat.  As someone suggested earlier, and the same as is done in every bar and restaurant every single day, their tallies match up at the end of the day or nobody goes home until the problem is found.

This is not rocket science, some would say, but I say this is a case where rocket science is better left to rockets, not vote counting.  Paper ballots and hand counting.

Yes but I also kept saying that there wouldn't be time to do such an investigation unless it was already underway as some hoped because of Trumps EO in 2018 and also some other tweets in early 2020.

The changes to state laws using covid as an excuse appear to have been illegal but no one did anything about it before the election and even after the 3rd that was in my personal opinion the only way this would have got looked into properly. 

The likes of Powel, Rudy, Flynn etc have unfortunately done far more damage than good because they raised the hopes of the most desperate people and then those same desperate people have been thrown under a bus. Sadly I would have to include Trump in this, yes he may have very well been fighting the swamp but if he knew he was going to lose then he should have conceded and I know that isn't going to be a popular thing to say but here we are.

My take: We're all, to one degree or another, on our own...there is no hero coming to save the day (same for the lefties) and as a friend of mine said recently...we just have to make our world smaller.

 

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Honestly if there is some kind of massive crash like 2008 then the Dems have possibly ended up with having to eat a sh*t sandwich.

Celebrations were short weren't they...and there's still troops in D.C.

God only knows what is going on but this is far far from beyond normal. It's like they're slowly boiling us like a frog and normalizing more crazy stuff gradually.

I don't think they would have done any of the stuff they did over the last year if something wasn't horribly wrong.

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Sen. Rand Paul clashes with ABC's Stephanopoulos: 'You're forgetting who you are as a journalist!'

An argument heard here on OilPrice and around the country.  Thanks to George and Rand for making it a headline.

Sen. Rand Paul clashes with ABC's Stephanopoulos: 'You're forgetting who you are as a journalist!'

'You're inserting yourself into the story,' the senator accused the ABC anchor

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. had a fiery exchange with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos on Sunday over the challenge to the 2020 presidential election with the top GOP lawmaker questioning the anchor's journalistic integrity. 

Stephanopoulos began the contentious interview by asking Paul if he accepts the "fact" that the "election was not stolen." Paul responded by insisting that the "debate" over voter fraud should occur and acknowledged how evidence from various claims was never examined since legal cases were "thrown out" by the courts. 

While Paul listed off various irregularities that could be challenged or overturned by the Supreme Court, including secretaries of state unilaterally changing election laws by skipping the legislative process, Stephanopoulos had enough. 

"Senator Paul, I have to stop you there," Stephanopoulos interrupted. "No election is perfect but there were 86 challenges filed by President Trump and his allies in court, all were dismissed... The Department of Justice led by William Barr said there was no widespread evidence of fraud. Can't you just say the words, 'This election was not stolen?'"

"What I would suggest is if we want greater confidence in our elections and 75 percent of Republicans agree with me is that we do need to look into election integrity and do need to see if we can restore confidence in the elections," Paul doubled down. 

"Well, 75 percent of Republicans agree with you because they were fed a big lie by President Trump and his supporters to say that the election was stolen," Stephanopoulos fired back. 

"George, where you make the mistake is that people coming from the liberal side like you, you immediately say everything's a lie instead of saying there are two sides to everything," Paul told the anchor. "Historically what would happen is if I said that I thought there was fraud, you would interview someone who said there wasn't, but now you insert yourself in the middle and say that the absolute fact is that everything I'm saying is a lie without examining the facts." 

After Stephanopoulos erupted at Paul to reiterate President Trump's claim that the election was "stolen," the senator shot back.

"You say we're all liars, you're just simply saying we're all liars," Paul accused Stephanopoulos. "There has been no examination, thorough examination of all the states to see what problems we had and see if we can fix them. Now let me say, to be clear, I voted to certify the state electors because I think it would be wrong for Congress to overturn that, but at the same time, I'm not willing just to sit here and say 'Oh, everybody on the Republican side is a liar and there is no fraud.' No, there were lots of problems and there were secretaries of state who illegally changed the law and that needs to be fixed and I'm going to work hard to fix it."

"I won't be cowed by people who say, 'Oh, you're a liar.' That's the problem with the media today is that they say all Republicans are liars and everything we say is a lie. There are two sides to every story. Interview somebody on the other side, but don't insert yourself into the story to say we're all liars because we knew there was some fraud in the election," Paul continued. 

"There are not two sides to the story," Stephanopoulos pushed back. "This has been looked at in every state and it was certified in every state."

"You're forgetting who you are! You are forgetting who you are as a journalist if you think there's only one side!" Paul exclaimed. "You're inserting yourself into the story to say that I'm a liar because I want to look at election fraud and I want to look at secretaries of state who illegally changed the voter laws without the permission of their state legislatures. That is incontrovertible. It happened. And you can't just sweep that under the rug and say oh nothing to see here and everybody's a liar and you're a fool if you bring this up! You're inserting yourself into the story. A journalist would hear both sides and there are two sides to this story."

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2 hours ago, El Nikko said:

but if he knew he was going to lose then he should have conceded and I know that isn't going to be a popular thing to say but here we are

What he should have done is not run at all.  Let someone else be the standard-bearer. 

Personally, I am just as glad it ended up as it did, although the Democrats have, yet once again, demonstrated their utter inability to get past "identity politics" and move forward to finding and running good people, so the public ends up with a contest between someone with personality defects and someone with memory defects.  These are sub-optimal choices.   That said, if the Republicans ended up running someone like Mr. Pence, then the USA would be in far greater trouble than if it had re-elected Mr. Trump, as Mr. Pence is, in the immortal descriptive made by George Will, an "oleaginous" creature.  Pence understands how Government runs, and he is unctuous enough to make it work for the crazies, and The USA would be headed down the path of absolutism and religious fundamentalism.  That would be disastrous.  It would lead to another internal "civil war."  And that would lead to probably a 10% overall casualty rate:   30 million civilians dead.  Better to have Mr. Biden stumble along for a few years. 

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Dem have both  House and Congress, yet Biden is signing executive orders like crazy to give House and Congress clean hands in selling out US's interest. I don't expect Biden will be in power for long.

IMHO, Money Market Theory, achieved by observation, is just a theory to keep the FIAT currency go longer.  It is not stable so or a big burst and go back to gold standard, the old way, or a forever happiness in government controlled e-currency. And Government won't need to worry about debt anymore. If the transition to that is not going well, then civil war may occur.

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18 minutes ago, Jan van Eck said:

Better to have Mr. Biden stumble along for a few years. 

We'll see. The natural tendency--the complacency we've all slipped into--is to reassure ourselves that there are all sorts of redundancies in place. That he really can't do anything stupid with nuclear because of stable minds in charge of the football. That he can't ruin the economy because of the brilliant minds of his economic advisors fencing with the Federal Reserve. That he can't really get us into an energy jam because, after all, who needs fossil fuels when everybody knows renewables are finally here. That we're insulated from his bumbling. 

That isn't necessarily the case. It would be, were everyone's intentions noble, but they're not. One should be well advised to study Mr. Biden's over-four decades in government. His decisions throughout the years bear little resemblance to the stance he is taking today--on almost any issue. In fact, his current stance is so very different than his curriculum vitae that had it happened overnight one would be alarmed of an exceptional, pathological mental change. 

What does that mean? Does it imply that Mr. Biden has a preternatural capacity for sampling the winds of societal change--riding the currents of evolution toward a gentler, nobler country and a better world? Does it mean that he has matured as a devout Roman Catholic gentleman of 78 years to the point that he has, in his superior mind, experienced a shining light transmogrification that enabled him to rectify late-stage abortion with the Council of Trent? Does it mean that all those decisions he made as a senator, and those 8 years he spent observing Mr. Obama have resulted in some sort of academic award of excellence: it all finally clicked?

I think not. I think Mr. Biden is a unidimensional man who started out life with mid-range normal IQ, who was buffeted about like most of us by the vicissitudes of an uncaring world, who truly wanted to do the best thing but experienced no Galileo moments, possessed no John F. Kennedy talents, and personified very little in the way of statesmanship. At this point he can function only in a faltering way, can sign executive orders but it's painful to watch, can read off the teleprompter in a reedy voice that, like an Edsel throwing itself out of gear, travels to the next stretch of road only through jerks and grinds that make one worry about the engine-room. In short, Mr. Biden is a disabled man who has sold out . . . to Mr. Sanders and his enthusiasm, to the progressives with their socialism, to Wall Street and their special interests, to Big Tech and all that money, to special interest groups who torque him around like he's wearing too many snap-on tools. 

Mr. Trump looked more dangerous than he was. But Mr. Biden is much more dangerous than he looks.

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(edited)

On 1/29/2021 at 6:08 PM, SUZNV said:

The only reason we could have massive voter fraud  are because many many small ones in the past has been dismissed as with the excuse that was too small to affect the elections, maybe on both sides,  but it will be rising larger in scale election after election with the same loopholes.

Media and Dem is playing the logical fallacy "The absence of evidence is not the evidence of absence"  in this election.

 

The Republicans have been screaming "massive voter fraud" for years. It's like repeatedly saying fire in a crowded theater (see also: https://supreme.findlaw.com/supreme-court-insights/schenck-v--united-states--case-summary.html). It has diminishing returns the more you say it. 

Usually, the effect is to reduce (usually) minority enfranchisement: https://prospect.org/article/republicans-right-acorn/

This has been happening ever since the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (despite the 15th amendment). 

I think you'll see probably thousands of cases like this in the future, both due to election interference and COVID disinformation: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/social-media-influencer-charged-election-interference-stemming-voter-disinformation-campaign

Most of these cases can happen years down the road because currently, much of social media is archived by many companies (storage and internet bandwidth has exponentially become cheaper). It's considered fair use (in terms of copyright law) to digitally archive content (which in practice these days, it means, you can keep it around forever). 

Keep in mind that the fundamental internet technologies will likely change in the next few years due to the uptake of WebRTC this last year (think for example, things like Zoom): https://www.wowza.com/blog/webrtc-encryption-and-security which may make peering network to peering network security more secure.

But keep in mind that WebRTC will probably put more power in Google, Apple, and Mozilla's hands, because making a modern web browser takes a lot of engineering, and those are the only three companies who have made a new one in the last 15 years (even Microsoft gave up and the new version of Edge is based on Chrome). This is a good thing and a bad thing since it limits censorship in countries like Russia and China, but probably stratifies power in the hands of too few.

Personally, I like most of the EFF's recommendations here (and many of these things have bipartisan support, even from silicon valley): https://www.eff.org/wp/eff-transition-memo-incoming-biden-administration

They make sense to me in today's internet. To me, deep fakes and other automated AI-created content is likely the next large scale problem. 

Edited by surrept33

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1 hour ago, surrept33 said:

The Republicans have been screaming "massive voter fraud" for years. It's like repeatedly saying fire in a crowded theater (see also: https://supreme.findlaw.com/supreme-court-insights/schenck-v--united-states--case-summary.html). It has diminishing returns the more you say it. 

Usually, the effect is to reduce (usually) minority enfranchisement: https://prospect.org/article/republicans-right-acorn/

This has been happening ever since the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (despite the 15th amendment). 

I think you'll see probably thousands of cases like this in the future, both due to election interference and COVID disinformation: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/social-media-influencer-charged-election-interference-stemming-voter-disinformation-campaign

Most of these cases can happen years down the road because currently, much of social media is archived by many companies (storage and internet bandwidth has exponentially become cheaper). It's considered fair use (in terms of copyright law) to digitally archive content (which in practice these days, it means, you can keep it around forever). 

Keep in mind that the fundamental internet technologies will likely change in the next few years due to the uptake of WebRTC this last year (think for example, things like Zoom): https://www.wowza.com/blog/webrtc-encryption-and-security which may make peering network to peering network security more secure.

But keep in mind that WebRTC will probably put more power in Google, Apple, and Mozilla's hands, because making a modern web browser takes a lot of engineering, and those are the only three companies who have made a new one in the last 15 years (even Microsoft gave up and the new version of Edge is based on Chrome). This is a good thing and a bad thing since it limits censorship in countries like Russia and China, but probably stratifies power in the hands of too few.

Personally, I like most of the EFF's recommendations here (and many of these things have bipartisan support, even from silicon valley): https://www.eff.org/wp/eff-transition-memo-incoming-biden-administration

They make sense to me in today's internet. To me, deep fakes and other automated AI-created content is likely the next large scale problem. 

Sigh. Just take a look at my links. I've quoted democrats crying "massive voter fraud" right in this thread including 2016 and 2018. They weren't wrong the fraud has been right there all this time. Dominion sold out to the highest bidder, do you really think those politicians like Hillary purchased $2 billion in "advertising"? Never happened, these media companies are publicly traded and they've directly and indirectly documented the politico buys. The rest just goes to lining pockets, primarily in highly urban areas. 

Don't forget Trump was way ahead in Michigan, he only lost in Detroit. Lest we forget this Detroit: 

3BAAF89C-865B-4BEB-9605-CC19AC1B58A5.png

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(edited)

2 hours ago, surrept33 said:

The Republicans have been screaming "massive voter fraud" for years. It's like repeatedly saying fire in a crowded theater (see also: https://supreme.findlaw.com/supreme-court-insights/schenck-v--united-states--case-summary.html). It has diminishing returns the more you say it. 

Usually, the effect is to reduce (usually) minority enfranchisement: https://prospect.org/article/republicans-right-acorn/

This has been happening ever since the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (despite the 15th amendment). 

I think you'll see probably thousands of cases like this in the future, both due to election interference and COVID disinformation: https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/social-media-influencer-charged-election-interference-stemming-voter-disinformation-campaign

Most of these cases can happen years down the road because currently, much of social media is archived by many companies (storage and internet bandwidth has exponentially become cheaper). It's considered fair use (in terms of copyright law) to digitally archive content (which in practice these days, it means, you can keep it around forever). 

Keep in mind that the fundamental internet technologies will likely change in the next few years due to the uptake of WebRTC this last year (think for example, things like Zoom): https://www.wowza.com/blog/webrtc-encryption-and-security which may make peering network to peering network security more secure.

But keep in mind that WebRTC will probably put more power in Google, Apple, and Mozilla's hands, because making a modern web browser takes a lot of engineering, and those are the only three companies who have made a new one in the last 15 years (even Microsoft gave up and the new version of Edge is based on Chrome). This is a good thing and a bad thing since it limits censorship in countries like Russia and China, but probably stratifies power in the hands of too few.

Personally, I like most of the EFF's recommendations here (and many of these things have bipartisan support, even from silicon valley): https://www.eff.org/wp/eff-transition-memo-incoming-biden-administration

They make sense to me in today's internet. To me, deep fakes and other automated AI-created content is likely the next large scale problem. 

For the elections, there are sworn witnesses and hearings, so at least have a good explanation and more transparency next time. It is good because people can trust their voting system and ensure it will not happen again in the future. Not play the logical fallacy: "the absence of evidence is the evidence of absence ".

Or Freedom of speech or censorship/political correctness, you cannot have both, mutual exclusive. Freedom of speech is in Constitution while censorship/political correctness isn't. If mainstream was defeated by social media or fake news, then they should question why they lose so much trust in them while people depends on them for the news yet don't trust their analysis or Op-ed. The main purpose of the freedom of speech or democracy are not to ensure the country will go in the right direction but to make sure if the majority are stupid then everyone share the consequence, pay the price, learn from it and go to the next election. A vaccine for people who trust something blindly next time. The consequence can be as bad as the rise of Hitler in Germany. Like Lincoln once said :“You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time."

Otherwise majority will have to bear the mistakes of a few if thing goes wrong. These few people with censorship power can just label the information they don't like and then censored it. How do you think dictators telling their people why they censored the news they don't like? They will tell that from the enemy or from the traitors. They off course will assume their citizens are too stupid to make the right choice from the news and rumors. 

Technology is not the excuse to change the constitution. Otherwise with the censorship power, it is as good as a tech council to decide what is good and bad for the country. What US media or US social networks don't depend on big tech cloud infrastructure? And which politicians don't depend on media to deliver their messages? Did you watch the Hunger games, which was banned in China, and wish the censorship of the capitol?

Hack and anti hack will always happen. If technology is not trustable then don't use them in the voting system. We rather wait for a week for a manual count than for months with the hassle and distrust that will haunt forever.

I don't care much EFF or promises from politician, they are meaningless. I just see actions and consequences and only time will tell. 

Edited by SUZNV
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(edited)

10 minutes ago, SUZNV said:

For the elections, there are sworn witnesses and hearings, so at least have a good explanation and more transparency next time. It is good because people can trust their voting system and ensure it will not happen again in the future. Not play the logical fallacy: "the absence of evidence is the evidence of absence ".

Or Freedom of speech or censorship/political correctness, you cannot have both, mutual exclusive. Freedom of speech is in Constitution while censorship/political correctness isn't. If mainstream was defeated by social media or fake news, then they should question why they lose so much trust in them while people depends on them for the news yet don't trust their analysis or Op-ed. The main purpose of the freedom of speech or democracy are not to ensure the country will go in the right direction but to make sure if the majority are stupid then everyone share the consequence, pay the price, learn from it and go to the next election. A vaccine for people who trust something blindly next time. The consequence can be as bad as the rise of Hitler in Germany. Like Lincoln once said :“You can fool some of the people all of the time, and all of the people some of the time, but you can not fool all of the people all of the time."

Otherwise majority will have to bear the mistakes of a few if thing goes wrong. These few people with censorship power can just label the information they don't like and then censored it. How do you think dictators telling their people why they censored the news they don't like? They will tell that from the enemy or from the traitors. They off course will assume their citizens are too stupid to make the right choice from the news and rumors. 

Technology is not the excuse to change the constitution. Otherwise with the censorship power, it is as good as a tech council to decide what is good and bad for the country. What US media or US social networks don't depend on big tech cloud infrastructure? And which politicians don't depend on media to deliver their messages? Did you watch the Hunger games, which was banned in China, and wish the censorship of the capitol?

Hack and anti hack will always happen. If technology is not trustable then don't use them in the voting system. We rather wait for a week for a manual count than for months with the hassle and distrust that will haunt forever.

I don't care much EFF or promises from politician, they are meaningless. I just see actions and consequences and only time will tell. 

Technology is not the excuse to change the constitution.

That statement alone speaks to the fundamental power of humanity. Never in the history of mankind has a nation rose to such a profound effect on this world.  We the people...

Don't Step On Me.

That is at the very core of this debacle. 

Edited by Eyes Wide Open
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