DR

Texans forced to have rolling black outs. Not from downed power line , but because the wind energy turbines are frozen.

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6 hours ago, Boat said:

What about natural gas sold to Mexico almost equals Texas natural gas consumption.

About that, now Mexico has millions of homes without power after imports of natural gas have been curbed, forcing power stations to go offline.

2021 has not disappointed so far in terms of craziness

I think we're going to see oil and gas really blow up in prices this year.

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12 minutes ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

Odd i have a vision of the 2020 elections. 

2020:  The year the Left ran amok...

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I'll just leave this here

B01C5DE3-3838-4C1C-84CC-A1D30ABBCD9A.png

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Just now, Dan Warnick said:

2020:  The year the Left ran amok...

2021: The year being freezing cold wakes a lot of people up

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(edited)

On 2/15/2021 at 1:01 PM, Roch said:

So much for green energy as primary energy source.Many don't realize Texas has a comparatively large number of wind energy installations.  Perfect geography until the weather doesn't cooperate. 

Last week Texas Governor Abbot received an award for being a leader in Wind Energy. 

https://apnews.com/press-release/pr-newswire/business-alternative-and-sustainable-energy-renewable-power-generation-state-governments-dallas-abeb25df38dbae0d30d5d470c187394f 

"The annual award recognizes commitment to wind development and to the people who rely on wind projects to support their families and communities"

Yea, very reliable .   LOL

 

Edited by Roch
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Ft Stockton lost power 2:38am and Texas-New Mexico Power saying tomorrow by 5p.m. power should be restored. Transformers couldn't take the strain. So i woke this a.m. to 38 degrees in my bus. Batteries were drained and generator had to be jump started. 12500 watt Onan now been running for 11 hours at a gallon per hour. Expensive electricity but better than freezing my arse off 🙂

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14 minutes ago, Dan Warnick said:

Man, that's a cool video.  I never saw one of those souped up jobs when I was a kid.  Just the basic lawn-mower engine on a frame, usually with one sort of working brake, and that was usually the front brake.  Yeah, some wild stops in that config!

Thanks for posting that.  Great memories.  Hey, wanna play baseball in the lot?

Wanna play baseball...That too stirs memories...huge memories.

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2 minutes ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

Ft Stockton lost power 2:38am and Texas-New Mexico Power saying tomorrow by 5p.m. power should be restored. Transformers couldn't take the strain. So i woke this a.m. to 38 degrees in my bus. Batteries were drained and generator had to be jump started. 12500 watt Onan now been running for 11 hours at a gallon per hour. Expensive electricity but better than freezing my arse off 🙂

how cold has it got in Texas to cause all this mayhem?

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4 hours ago, 0R0 said:

This episode shows us that renewables technology and its applications are still not ready and we don't have sufficient practical system management experience to deploy them immediately without NG backup.

Energy turbines frozen in Texas?   Explains Gerry's question on how did they lose 12 GW of power out of 24 GW capacity?  What about wind storms that literally blow out them?  This video was few years ago but scary as hell.  Brakes got out on slowing blades.

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(edited)

4 minutes ago, El Nikko said:

 

how cold has it got in Texas to cause all this mayhem?

Last nite 7F today 15 tomorrow 54

Power Outage Map | TNMP

Edited by Old-Ruffneck
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3 minutes ago, LANDMAN X said:

Energy turbines frozen in Texas?   Explains Gerry's question on how did they lose 12 GW of power out of 24 GW capacity?  What about wind storms that literally blow out them?  This video was few years ago but scary as hell.  Brakes got out on slowing blades.

Windmoelle-vaelter.wmv

There are about 6000 windmills in a 100 mile circle around Ft Stockton. 2 days of freezing fog of 1/2 ice and no wind killed em. Ugly effers upon the nice mesas........ grrrrrr

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1 hour ago, Roch said:

Now he is learning a lesson. We need redundancy and localization of power sources. 

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(edited)

1 hour ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

Last nite 7F today 15 tomorrow 54

Power Outage Map | TNMP

We must be doing something right in Illinois. Lots of wind turbines, imported electricity, old nuclear (subsidized), still some coal, propane. Not much natural gas turbines though, due to the nuclear and wind forces buying votes. We have plenty available

https://poweroutage.us/area/state/illinois

Edited by ronwagn
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(edited)

2 hours ago, LANDMAN X said:

Energy turbines frozen in Texas?   Explains Gerry's question on how did they lose 12 GW of power out of 24 GW capacity?  What about wind storms that literally blow out them?  This video was few years ago but scary as hell.  Brakes got out on slowing blades.

Windmoelle-vaelter.wmv

Actually, that is what happens when the nacelle/tower rotation mechanism fails forcing the brakes to try and pretend to stop the wind turbine.  Brakes are backup devices.  Your #1 device for stopping a wind turbine is pulling it away from the wind in question.  Brakes are only there to stop the wind turbine from free wheeling and so people can work on it. 

EDIT: There are many names for the mech to yaw the wind turbine out of the wind. There is no industry standard

Edited by footeab@yahoo.com
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1 hour ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

yuppers, i be back in week an half....

It should be warming up by then. The worst will be over.

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2 hours ago, LANDMAN X said:

Energy turbines frozen in Texas?   Explains Gerry's question on how did they lose 12 GW of power out of 24 GW capacity?  What about wind storms that literally blow out them?  This video was few years ago but scary as hell.  Brakes got out on slowing blades.

Windmoelle-vaelter.wmv

Overspeed events never have a good outcome with rotating equipment. I never stood to the sides of the machine during tests.

 

 

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13 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

It should be warming up by then. The worst will be over.

Ah, several million taking a dead of winter high plains camping trip for the next week... Fun times.  Fun times. 

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1 hour ago, Ward Smith said:

39CB6536-341F-414C-B573-261A4673DC56.jpeg

CF9C0699-8B7A-4F4D-851A-FD49E1854CD8.jpeg

Man!  If a person wanted to be the new governor of Texas, all they have to do is put up that graphic everywhere they campaign.  Nobody, I mean nobody, thinks of Texas and doesn't think of oil.  No excuse.  The administrations of Texas dropped the ball.

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The Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) told the Austin American Statesman that roughly 12,000 megawatts of Texas' wind generation capacity had been hampered as of Sunday due to frozen wind turbines. However, they also noted that unfrozen wind turbines are spinning at a higher rate than expected, helping to offset the losses.

ERCOT operates Texas' electric grid and manages the deregulated energy market for 75% of the state,

"This is a unique winter storm that's more widespread with lots of moisture in West Texas, where there's a lot of times not a lot of moisture," ERCOT senior director of system operations Dan Woodfin told the outlet. "It's certainly more than what we would typically assume."

It is estimated between 2.5 and 3.5 million people in Texas have been left without power amid the storm's frigid temperatures. An ERCOT spokesperson did not immediately return FOX Business' request for comment.

Assume = ass out of u and me..............dumbsh***

 

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3 hours ago, El Nikko said:
3 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

2020:  The year the Left ran amok...

2021: The year being freezing cold wakes a lot of people up

2021:  The year the (frozen) chickens came home to roost.

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Found a highly relevant celebratory press release of a few years ago in this respect. You may call these people and tell them how well it worked out!

Texas Sierra Club Press on TXU Cancellation of Eight Proposed Coal Plants
- - - - -

For Immediate Release (February 26, 2007):

Sierra Club Celebrates Cancellation of Eight TXU Coal Plants

Still Needed: Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy and Time Out on Other
Coal Plants

(Austin)--A Texas Sierra Club spokesperson today celebrated the
cancellation of eight proposed TXU coal plants as a victory that
resulted from the unprecedented coalition that mobilized vigorous
opposition to the plants, but he raised concerns that state officials
may now think that the building of other coal plants should proceed even
though energy efficiency and expansion of renewable energy could avoid
the need for the plants.

"A 'time out' on the building of any new coal plants in Texas is still
needed while the State of Texas ramps up energy efficiency, clarifies
and tightens the permitting process for power plants, and develops a
state energy plan that emphasizes efficiency and renewable energy," said
Sierra Club state director Ken Kramer. "Additionally the Texas
Legislature needs to approve the numerous energy efficiency bills now
under consideration, and that legislation needs to be implemented before
decisions on new power plants are made."

"The cancellation of eight proposed TXU coal plants is certainly a
victory for the people of Texas, said Kramer. "What forced the
negotiations was the unprecedented and vigorous opposition to the coal
plants from a diverse coalition of environmentalists, ranchers and other
rural landowners, city mayors, prominent business leaders, faith-based
groups, and numerous state legislators. The effort to pass a moratorium
on permitting new coal plants, the tremendous concern demonstrated by
the thousands of Texans who rallied at the State Capitol against
fast-tracking coal plants, the lawsuits and permit contests by
environmental and landowner groups - all of these contributed to the
decision to cancel eight coal plants."

"Let's be clear, however, that while Texans have won a battle against
dirty coal plants, we have not yet won the larger conflict over the
energy future for our state, our nation, and our planet," said Kramer.
"Our best energy future is to pursue smart energy solutions. We must
take the next steps: increase energy efficiency, expand the use of
renewable energy, and clean up or replace existing dirty fuel sources.
We welcome the commitments from the new TXU in that regard and look
forward to them being implemented expeditiously and vigorously."

"The fact that TXU apparently is still planning to pursue three
coal-fired power plants in Texas - ones using dirty lignite coal - and
that other utility companies are planning to pursue at least eight or
more other coal (and/or petroleum coke) burning power plants in Texas is
certainly cause for continuing concern," noted Kramer. "We don't
understand how TXU's intention to go forward with some new coal plants
jives with their commitments on energy efficiency and renewables. A
report by Optimal Energy demonstrated that energy efficiency could meet
anticipated new energy demands in Texas, so why does the new TXU want to
go forward with any new coal plants?"

"There is a danger that some people will now think that the cancellation
of eight proposed coal plants takes care of all of the concerns that
have been raised about the use of coal as an energy source and that we
can now continue with business as usual," Kramer added. 
"We need to move
away from reliance on fuel choices that make certain communities
'sacrifice zones' for our wasteful energy consumption. For example, we
need to address the impacts on local communities that arise from the
mining, transporting, and/or burning of coal. Allowing the building of
even some new coal plants does not deal with those issues."

For More Information:
Ken Kramer 512-476-6962 (office) 512-626-4204 (cell)
Cyrus Reed 512-740-4086 (cell)
Donna Hoffman 512-477-1729 (office) 512-299-5776 (cell)

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