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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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9 minutes ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

Lmao. The range on that must be about 50mi. Foolish to tow a bobcat around with a half ton anyway. 

Yet people are lining up to buy them. It is almost as if they know something you don't.  Each one sold will be one less ICE pickup sold.

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Edited by Jay McKinsey

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(edited)

EVs in North America picking up steam.......

 

please note the real new news.......

All told, the automaker has bumped up spending plans for BEVs to $30 billion through 2030, about 250% more than it had committed to as recently as mid-2021........

 

personally I am waiting for an all electric all wheel drive Ford Escape (basic needs is a 120 mile charge) which will replace a 2003 Ford Escape which has only a few more years of life.......already getting ready with the installation of a 240 volt line/outlet(s) for chargers in my garage and conduits to a 1000 square foot flat roof above the garage for solar panels .....Battery shelves are going in this winter for storage ......2 DC powered ac/heat pumps in the works to be placed atop garage for cooling heating house.

 

All-Electric Mach-E Nearly Outsells Gas-Powered Mustang as Ford Accelerates EV Push

Ford now second in BEV market to Tesla — but holding that spot could be a challenge.

Paul A. Eisenstein
Paul A. Eisenstein , Publisher & Editor-in-Chief

Dec. 06, 2021

 

Until recently an also-ran in the battery-electric vehicle market, Ford Motor Co. is on the fast track to become the emerging segment’s second-largest player — though it will face a tough battle during the next couple years as competitors flood the market with new offerings.

2022 Ford Mustang Mach-E GT - in woods

Sales of the Mustang Mach-E have been on the rise, challenging not only other to EVs, but its sibling Mustang coupe.

In a surprise development, Ford’s first long-range BEV, the Mustang Mach-E SUV, nearly outsold the conventional, gas-powered Mustang coupe in November. And, even though it won’t launch production of its next all-electric model until next June, the F-150 Lightning appears off to a good start. Even after announcing it will double production capacity for the battery-powered pickup, it’s likely to take Ford until well into 2023 before it could meet the advance reservations it already has on hand.

While Tesla continues to dominate the battery-electric vehicle sales charts, primarily with its Models 3 and Y, the Mach-E has sharply cut into its market share this year and could gain even more momentum with the addition of two new variants, the GT and GT Performance Pack.

An unexpected hit

There was plenty of skepticism when Ford introduced the Mach-E in 2020 — especially inside the company where many members of the Mustang team questioned the wisdom of using the iconic pony badge on an SUV, never mind an electric one. And more than a few traditional buyers took to social media to air their grievances.

But such concerns quickly vanished as Mach-E started nabbing awards — among other things being named North American Utility Vehicle of the Year. And sales quickly took off. By mid-2021, demand was starting to outstrip the conventional pony car.

2022 Ford Mustang Stealth Edition Appearance Package The Ford Mustang is outselling its all-electric namesake — but only by a bit as the Mach-E’s proven very popular.

All told, buyers drove off with 6,797 Mustang-badged vehicles in November, including 3,008 of the BEVs. That was the second-best month Mach-E has had, and represents 2% of Ford’s total U.S. sales for the month, a significant showing for a single battery-powered car. Since January, motorists have purchased 24,794 of the electric SUVs.

Add in the automaker’s plug-in and conventional hybrids and, it reported, “Ford’s electrified vehicle sales in November grew at a rate more than three times faster than the overall electrified vehicle segment, taking Ford’s electrified vehicle share to 10% compared to 5.4% last year.This set up a record November on sales of 11,116 electrified vehicles — up 153.6 percent” compared to the prior year.

A grain of salt, perhaps?

The surge of the Mach-E should be viewed with caution, however. Like the rest of the industry, Ford had to idle most of its factories at one point or another this year due to the ongoing semiconductor shortages. But Ford “is putting its semiconductors where it thinks they can help the most,” said Stephanie Brinley, principal auto analyst with IHS Markit, and that has left production of the Mach-E continue virtually uninterrupted.

2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV The Mustang Mach-E’s sales pushed past the Chevy Bolt EV last month.

The story is quite different for Mach-E’s most direct rival. In November, the Ford BEV pushed past the Chevrolet Bolt EV on the sales charts — though that’s at least partially the result of the recalls the Chevy model has experienced. Production of the Bolt was put on hold last month so parent General Motors could address battery-fire problems. A modified battery pack has, for now, been redirected to serve as the replacement for faulty packs for Bolts already on the road. But the Bolt plant in Orion Township, Michigan won’t be back up and running until early next year.

It remains to be seen whether the Chevy model can regain traction in the face of the negative publicity generated by a series of battery fires.

Ford ups its EV aspirations

The strong demand for the Mach-E, as well as the 160,000 reservations confirmed for the F-150 Lightning, have buoyed Ford’s commitment to the battery-car market, CEO Jim Farley told TheDetroitBureau.com in September, following the announcement of a massive manufacturing site Memphis, as well as two new battery plants in nearby Kentucky.

Ford CEO Farley Sept 2021 Ford CEO Jim Farley’s been upping the amount the automaker will spend on its electrification program. It’s now at $30 billion by 2030.

All told, the automaker has bumped up spending plans for BEVs to $30 billion through 2030, about 250% more than it had committed to as recently as mid-2021.

“This is a really pivotal moment for us,” as Ford rapidly shifts its attention away from internal combustion technology, said Lisa Drake, Ford’s chief operating officer, North America, at an investor conference last week.

The automaker has confirmed it has a battery-powered Lincoln SUV, as well as an all-electric Transit van in the works. Beyond that, its specific production plans are still somewhat hazy. It has yet to offer the level of detail provided by key competitors like GM.

Plenty of challengers lining up

The largest of the Detroit automakers is just rolling out the new GMC Hummer EV. The pickup is the first GM model using the automaker’s new Ultium batteries and one of several new, skateboard-like architectures. The all-electric Cadillac Lyriq will follow next year with GM planning to have as many as 30 BEVs in production by mid-decade — though not all will be available in the U.S. market.

Then there’s Volkswagen which introduced its first long-range BEV for the American market, the ID.4. That electric SUV currently is being imported from Europe but production will launch next year after a major expansion at the VW plant in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

Ford's Farley at Blue Oval Sept 2021 Ford CEO Jim Farley talked a bit about the company’s EV plans at the celebration for Blue Oval City — a $5.5 billion EV investment.

VW has, by far, announced the most aggressive commitment of any manufacturer to go electric, at more than $110 billion this decade. And its CEO Herbert Diess recently confirmed that more models will target the States due to growing demand.

Still more to come

And there are plenty of other competitors coming. Kia hopes to duplicate Ford’s success with the EV6 SUV that is also up for honors as this year’s North American Utility Vehicle of the Year. The Lucid Air, meanwhile, is vying for Car of the Year honors, while the Rivian R1T is one of three finalists in the Truck of the Year category.

Between autumn 2020 and December 2022, TheDetroitBureau.com forecast, the number of all-electric models sold in the U.S. alone will roughly quadruple, to at least 50.

So, there’ll be plenty of other new products looking to push past Ford’s Mustang Mach-E — and take a run at the BEV market’s real dominant force, Tesla.

 
Edited by notsonice

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On 12/4/2021 at 2:20 AM, Jay McKinsey said:

Tesla's profit margins far exceed any local subsidies or carbon credits. Both could go away and they would still have the industry's best vehicle profit margin. 

 

I have a simple question Jay

Why dont you own a Tesla yourself??

You bang on about how brilliant they are and that they are taking over the world, yet bizzarely you dont feel the need to actually go and buy one for yourself! Weird!!

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On 12/5/2021 at 9:58 PM, ronwagn said:

The Green New Deal is part of Agenda 2030 globalism and the COVID hysteria. It is attempting to become a secular forced religion. Watch this video about COVID concentration camps in Australia. https://thefederalist.com/2021/12/03/covid-free-woman-recounts-time-in-australian-quarantine-camp-you-feel-like-youre-in-prison-like-youve-done-something-wrong/

Apart from the indiginous population surely Australia started life as a penal colony in 1788 anyway. Just reverting to type 🤣

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(edited)

13 hours ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

Lmao. The range on that must be about 50mi. Foolish to tow a bobcat around with a half ton anyway. 

Check out the details - you might be surprised.  I put in a reservation myself.  I have pulled a bobcat front end loader and a 12,000 lbs trailer (tractor w attachments on a flatbed) with a dodge 1500.  Foolish on the freeway? For sure.  On back roads and country roads though it does fine.

Edited by Eric Gagen
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1 hour ago, Eric Gagen said:

Check out the details - you might be surprised.  I put in a reservation myself.  I have pulled a bobcat front end loader and a 12,000 lbs trailer (tractor w attachments on a flatbed) with a dodge 1500.  Foolish on the freeway? For sure.  On back roads and country roads though it does fine.

In the mud? You're fucked, and so will anyone that pulls a trailer with a battery powered truck. 

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17 minutes ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

In the mud? You're fucked, and so will anyone that pulls a trailer with a battery powered truck. 

Please note the comment

electric motors can develop more torque than ICE engines, even at zero RPMs.

Watch an electric Ford F-150 tow over a million pounds

Ford is wooing its base with the promise of mammoth torque.

 

Ford is trying to show its rabid pickup truck fans that EVs aren't just for latte-sipping Tesla pilots. In an impressive demonstration of torque, an electric F-150 prototype towed 10 double-decker rail cars stuffed with 42 current-model F-150s, weighing over a million pounds (500 tons) in total. That shows promise that it could beat Ford's current towing champ, the 2019 F-150 with a 3.5L twin-turbocharged V6, that's rated to tow 13,200 pounds (6.6 tons).

 

It's just a technology demo and of course there's a big difference between rated and maximum towing capacity. It does show, though, how electric motors can develop more torque than ICE engines, even at zero RPMs. There's a reason, after all, that most train locomotives are diesel electric, with the diesel engine acting as a generator and the electric motor actually driving the train.

Left unsaid in all this, of course, is that while an electric F-150 might be able to pull more weight than a gas-powered model, it wouldn't be able to do so for nearly as long. The ICE model has a (non-towing) range of 720 miles with the optional 36-gallon tanks, while the longest-range EV out there, the Tesla Model S 100D, can go 370 miles. Ford has yet to reveal the battery capacity of the electric F-150, nor when it will hit the market.

 

 

 

 

lFord

Edited by notsonice

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6 minutes ago, notsonice said:

Please note the comment

electric motors can develop more torque than ICE engines, even at zero RPMs.

Watch an electric Ford F-150 tow over a million pounds

Ford is wooing its base with the promise of mammoth torque.

 

Ford is trying to show its rabid pickup truck fans that EVs aren't just for latte-sipping Tesla pilots. In an impressive demonstration of torque, an electric F-150 prototype towed 10 double-decker rail cars stuffed with 42 current-model F-150s, weighing over a million pounds (500 tons) in total. That shows promise that it could beat Ford's current towing champ, the 2019 F-150 with a 3.5L twin-turbocharged V6, that's rated to tow 13,200 pounds (6.6 tons).

 

It's just a technology demo and of course there's a big difference between rated and maximum towing capacity. It does show, though, how electric motors can develop more torque than ICE engines, even at zero RPMs. There's a reason, after all, that most train locomotives are diesel electric, with the diesel engine acting as a generator and the electric motor actually driving the train.

Left unsaid in all this, of course, is that while an electric F-150 might be able to pull more weight than a gas-powered model, it wouldn't be able to do so for nearly as long. The ICE model has a (non-towing) range of 720 miles with the optional 36-gallon tanks, while the longest-range EV out there, the Tesla Model S 100D, can go 370 miles. Ford has yet to reveal the battery capacity of the electric F-150, nor when it will hit the market.

 

 

 

 

lFord

Oh, I'm sure they can. 

I wasn't talking about the ability to tow it. I'm talking about the ability to use the truck for a 12 hour day and then tow whatever you're hauling back to the yard for the night. 

You've never actually worked a day in your life, so you don't know what an honest day's work means, you donkey. 

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(edited)

9 minutes ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

Oh, I'm sure they can. 

I wasn't talking about the ability to tow it. I'm talking about the ability to use the truck for a 12 hour day and then tow whatever you're hauling back to the yard for the night. 

You've never actually worked a day in your life, so you don't know what an honest day's work means, you donkey. 

you are a joke, I bet you still live with your parents. I was working underground before your punk ass was even born. You have no idea what you are talking about ....stuck in the mud....lmao ....have you ever driven an electric vehicle....I was running battery shuttle cars hauling coal on 15 percent grades while you were still in diapers crying for another bottle. Punk , all your posts are nothing but bs babble

Edited by notsonice
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(edited)

8 minutes ago, notsonice said:

you are a joke, I bet you still live with your parents. I was working underground before your punk ass was even born. You have no idea what you are talking about ....stuck in the mud....lmao ....have you ever driven an electric vehicle....I was running battery shuttle cars hauling coal on 15 percent grades while you were still in diapers crying for another bottle. Punk 

Hahahaha. Sure you were you bitch. I'm 43 and owned my own homes since I was 21 and worked my way up from roughneck to international completions consultant.

Was I in diapers in 1995? Nope. Could I smash your weak fuckin chin until your teeth turned to dust in your throat? Definitely. Want me to find you? I can. 

All your posts are whining retardation and propaganda. You're too stupid to understand that though. 

Edited by QuarterCenturyVet

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58 minutes ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

In the mud? You're fucked, and so will anyone that pulls a trailer with a battery powered truck. 

Any 1/2 ton PU trying to haul a heavy trailer in the mud is in trouble.  That’s not an electric vs petroleum issue.  That’s a weight issue.  You need a heavier haul truck if traction conditions are poor.

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1 minute ago, Eric Gagen said:

Any 1/2 ton PU trying to haul a heavy trailer in the mud is in trouble.  That’s not an electric vs petroleum issue.  That’s a weight issue.  You need a heavier haul truck if traction conditions are poor.

Good thing the Lightning weighs the same as an F250.

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2 hours ago, Eric Gagen said:

Check out the details - you might be surprised.  I put in a reservation myself.  I have pulled a bobcat front end loader and a 12,000 lbs trailer (tractor w attachments on a flatbed) with a dodge 1500.  Foolish on the freeway? For sure.  On back roads and country roads though it does fine.

Pure Tom foolery at best and i do believe you know that quite well. While straight forward pulling can be done...any sudden braking or left to right maneuvering would more that likely result in a sheer loss of control.

But you do have the right to engage in such risky behavior, until it bites you in the arse..And then there is our transmission temps....etc etc etc. 

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10 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Good thing the Lightning weighs the same as an F250.

It is not about weight to balance the torsional loads, it is the suspension that controls those load factors. Unless you care to rewrite the dynamics...of which i am quite sure you might do with total abandon...

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12 minutes ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

It is not about weight to balance the torsional loads, it is the suspension that controls those load factors. Unless you care to rewrite the dynamics...of which i am quite sure you might do with total abandon...

When pulling a trailer through deep mud at less than 20MPH? 

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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11 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

I have a simple question Jay

Why dont you own a Tesla yourself??

You bang on about how brilliant they are and that they are taking over the world, yet bizzarely you dont feel the need to actually go and buy one for yourself! Weird!!

What is even weirder is that you respond to a post where I was talking about their profit margins and you can't figure it out. I do own Tesla.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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17 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

When pulling a trailer through deep mud at less than 20MPH? 

Why you think the 1/2 ton suspension and steering is going to help you in rough terrain mud while trying to pull +12,000lbs? 

You don't do anything off the pavement do you. 

Thank God. Stay on the pavement, princess. 

*facepalm 

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(edited)

1 hour ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

Pure Tom foolery at best and i do believe you know that quite well. While straight forward pulling can be done...any sudden braking or left to right maneuvering would more that likely result in a sheer loss of control.

But you do have the right to engage in such risky behavior, until it bites you in the arse..And then there is our transmission temps....etc etc etc. 

Sure it can be done.  Keep your speed down.  Know your route and plan it out.  Follow a lead car so you have extra time in case of some unexpected road issue. Keep your speed down - maybe 40 mph maximum. That way there won’t be any incredible need for braking or wild maneuvers. Your transmission won’t overheat either.  It’s not rocket science.  Farmers do it all the time moving heavy equipment around.  

Edited by Eric Gagen

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(edited)

50 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

When pulling a trailer through deep mud at less than 20MPH? 

Honestly if it’s really bad mud you don’t use an over the road truck to pull it anyway.  Speaking from my experience in the oilfield, if it’s just a short distance from ‘good road’ to good road’ with a light load, maybe.  Anything else and you pull the load with a large farm tractor in the bad area.  If that won’t work pull it with a bulldozer.  If that won’t work pull with 2 dozers in a spread up front with a 3rd dozer pushing.

(why yes I do know how to get a 150,000 lb tractor trailer through several miles of muddy hills with no trail) 

what you don’t do is get an on road haul tractor (or pickup) to try and move the load under those conditions.  

Edited by Eric Gagen

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(edited)

1 hour ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

Why you think the 1/2 ton suspension and steering is going to help you in rough terrain mud while trying to pull +12,000lbs? 

You don't do anything off the pavement do you. 

Thank God. Stay on the pavement, princess. 

*facepalm 

You said the problem was that it was battery powered now you have changed the topic to suspensions and steering which have nothing to do with whether it is battery powered.

Towing Bobcats was the subject and many weigh less than 9000lbs while the Lightning is rated to 10,000lbs towing. It also has far more torque than most F250s, more than all of them from 0mph. Actually I go off road frequently. You really are an idiot.

Your biggest problem is that this is just the very first generation of EV trucks. Your fossils don't stand a chance.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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50 minutes ago, Eric Gagen said:

Sure it can be done.  Keep your speed down.  Know your route and plan it out.  Follow a lead car so you have extra time in case of some unexpected road issue. Keep your speed down - maybe 40 mph maximum. That way there won’t be any incredible need for braking or wild maneuvers. It’s not rocket science.  Farmers do it all the time moving heavy equipment around.  

Smiles being a ND farm boy... being raised on the farm i can assure i know quite well what famers will or can do or what oil field workers will attempt. This is a conversation about mainstream vehicles and everyday use. 

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(edited)

9 minutes ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

Smiles being a ND farm boy... being raised on the farm i can assure i know quite well what famers will or can do or what oil field workers will attempt. This is a conversation about mainstream vehicles and everyday use. 

yeah - not really the 'key' point, but it does tie together in one way:  An F150 lightening is about as good for pulling as a non electric F150.  There are limits on both of them but they aren't really any worse.  Now range when pulling a load is a different matter, and I guarantee the electric one won't go as far on a tank/charge.  

Edited by Eric Gagen

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(edited)

Oil demand looks exceedingly healthy going forward into 2022 and decades beyond.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/JP-Morgan-Predicts-The-End-Of-Covid-A-Strong-Economy-And-125-Oil.html

"A vibrant economy means robust demand for oil, and JP Morgan even said last week that crude oil prices could soar to $125 per barrel in 2022 and $150 in 2023 due to OPEC's limited capacity to boost production.

The Omicron variant that has spooked markets over the past two weeks could be the beginning of the end of the pandemic, JP Morgan strategists Marko Kolanovic and Bram Kaplan wrote in a note last week, as carried by Bloomberg.

If the new variant turns out to be less deadly, it would fit the historical patterns of virus evolution. This would be bullish for risk markets as it could suggest the end of the pandemic is in sight, the strategists said."

Edited by Ecocharger

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