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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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(edited)

1 hour ago, TailingsPond said:

Note the Nobel laureate was not an author of that paper.

You may also hate that your reference is pro-vaccination:

"We believe that the evidence to date supports the worldwide extension of IVM treatments for COVID-19, complementary to immunizations."

Kudos for promoting the science you hate.  

 

I didn't say it was. Look at the headline of it  dummy. My statement was that ivermectin is used for people. Regardless of its efficacy, it's not "hOrSe DeWoRmEr" in human treatment applications,  like a certain no-mind likes to parrot. 

Edited by QuarterCenturyVet

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6 minutes ago, Wombat One said:

The world is watching the joke of what you call elections in the USA. Here in Australia, you all are what as known as a "bunch of Galah's". So much for the world leading democracy? One moment you have "hanging chads", the next it is outright theft and fraud. Biden is even more illegitemate than Bush was and now the old faggot is saying that Australia cannot have nuclear weapons while China and North Korea are allowed to point them at us coz we host ur intelligence apparatus? Fuck off!!!!!! 

He's a Canadian chemist. From Wetaskawin. Living in Edmonton because he can't get a job in the private sector. 

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(edited)

39 minutes ago, Wombat One said:

You mean if your Democrat, it should be easy to vote 50 times whilst throwing Republican votes in the trash bin?

No, and there is no evidence that anything like this happened. Audit after audit and nothing except even more votes for Biden. You just can't cope with losing.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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Just now, Jay McKinsey said:

No, and there is no evidence that anything like this happened. How many audits have we had now and nothing? You just can't cope with losing.

I didn't lose. The USA did. Even you Jay. In the eyes of the rest of the world, Biden is a loser and so are all those that pretend that he actually won an alection and was somehow the most popular candidate in history. Get a grip Jay. The world was shocked that Bush won by a "hanging chad" and is even more disgusted by your last attempt at a "free" election. You put the CCP to shame.

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8 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

No, and there is no evidence that anything like this happened. How many audits have we had now and nothing? You just can't cope with losing.

I worked just as well with Obama as I did with Bush. I don't mind working with whoever the US public actually elects. But Biden was not elected. I cannot work with an imposter, whether American or Chinese.

Mr Xitler and Mr Bidehistime have a lot in common if you ask me.

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1 hour ago, TailingsPond said:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34181716/

Conclusions: In comparison to SOC or placebo, IVM did not reduce all-cause mortality, length of stay or viral clearance in RCTs in COVID-19 patients with mostly mild disease. IVM did not have an effect on AEs or severe AEs. IVM is not a viable option to treat COVID-19 patients.

So, just as effective as a Covid vaccine to already hospitalized patients. Got it. Thanks for the strawman argument.

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(edited)

3 hours ago, TailingsPond said:

Other than all the lawyers and greater than 50% of the US voting population... you live in some MAGA fantasy even though you live in Canada.

Please leave as quickly as possible.  When R. Notely wins the next election by a huge landslide you will get a greater taste of reality.  

Kenny screwed the right so far they will suffer for a long time.   Just like trump - an embarrassment

Lol. You mean your REdmonton reality? 

A big government politician isn't what Albertans want, be it NDP (Socialist), Liberal (democratic socialist), or eastern conservative (slightly less democratic socialist). Small and effective government, personal responsibility, pro business, pro nuclear family, pro Albertan freedom. That will win.

Notley is none of those. 

Edited by QuarterCenturyVet

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6 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Bad news for Tesla on that, highlights the problems with EVs.

You mean the way Tesla's sales just keep exploding:

image.thumb.png.321b7af5282676f5ee0684014939504d.png

 

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12 hours ago, notsonice said:

what a joke , the goof ball ran the car for 7.3 hours and drove only 109 Miles..

2:09 Starting the drive
3:52 50% charge dissipated
8:02 90% charge dissipated
9:27 End of drive

 

 He traveled 109 miles in 7.3 hours???? How many miles ,to the gallon ,do you get sitting in your car for 7.3 hours in bitter cold temp with the heat blasting away while parked?  10? How long does a full tank of gas last while parked,running and  in the bitter cold? 

Mine lasts about 40 hours. 

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SLAC, Stanford researchers revitalize batteries by bringing ‘dead’ lithium back to life

23 December 2021

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University may have found a way to revitalize rechargeable lithium batteries, potentially boosting the range of electric vehicles and battery life in next-gen electronic devices.

As lithium batteries cycle, they accumulate little islands of inactive lithium that are cut off from the electrodes, decreasing the battery’s capacity to store charge. But the research team discovered that they could make this “dead” lithium creep like a worm toward one of the electrodes until it reconnects, partially reversing the unwanted process.

Resurrecting_lithium_sv_movement_final_highres

When an island of inactivated lithium metal travels to a battery’s anode, or negative electrode, and reconnects, it comes back to life, contributing electrons to the battery’s current flow and lithium ions for storing charge until it’s needed. The island moves by adding lithium metal at one end (blue) and dissolving it at the other end (red). Researchers from SLAC and Stanford discovered that they could drive the island’s growth in the direction of the anode by adding a brief, high-current discharging step right after the battery charges. Reconnecting the island to the anode increased the lifetime of their lithium-ion test cell by nearly 30%. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory


Adding this extra step slowed the degradation of their test battery and increased its lifetime by nearly 30%. A study on the work is published in Nature.

We are now exploring the potential recovery of lost capacity in lithium-ion batteries using an extremely fast discharging step.

—Stanford postdoctoral fellow Fang Liu, lead author

 

A great deal of research is looking for ways to make rechargeable batteries with lighter weight, longer lifetimes, improved safety, and faster charging speeds than the lithium-ion technology currently used in cellphones, laptops and electric vehicles. A particular focus is on developing lithium-metal batteries, which could store more energy per volume or weight. For example, in electric cars, these next-generation batteries could increase the mileage per charge and possibly take up less trunk space.

Both battery types use positively charged lithium ions that shuttle back and forth between the electrodes. Over time, some of the metallic lithium becomes electrochemically inactive, forming isolated islands of lithium that no longer connect with the electrodes. This results in a loss of capacity and is a particular problem for lithium-metal technology and for the fast charging of lithium-ion batteries.

However, in the new study, the researchers demonstrated that they could mobilize and recover the isolated lithium to extend battery life.

I always thought of isolated lithium as bad, since it causes batteries to decay and even catch on fire. But we have discovered how to electrically reconnect this ‘dead’ lithium with the negative electrode to reactivate it.

—Yi Cui, a professor at Stanford and SLAC and investigator with the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Research (SIMES) who led the research

 

The idea for the study was born when Cui speculated that applying a voltage to a battery’s cathode and anode could make an isolated island of lithium physically move between the electrodes—a process his team has now confirmed with their experiments.

The scientists fabricated an optical cell with a lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt-oxide (NMC) cathode, a lithium anode and an isolated lithium island in between. This test device allowed them to track in real time what happens inside a battery when in use.

They discovered that the isolated lithium island wasn’t “dead” at all but responded to battery operations. When charging the cell, the island slowly moved towards the cathode; when discharging, it crept in the opposite direction.

It’s like a very slow worm that inches its head forward and pulls its tail in to move nanometer by nanometer. In this case, it transports by dissolving away on one end and depositing material to the other end. If we can keep the lithium worm moving, it will eventually touch the anode and reestablish the electrical connection.

—Yi Cui

 

The results, which the scientists validated with other test batteries and through computer simulations, also demonstrate how isolated lithium could be recovered in a real battery by modifying the charging protocol.

We found that we can move the detached lithium toward the anode during discharging, and these motions are faster under higher currents. So we added a fast, high-current discharging step right after the battery charges, which moved the isolated lithium far enough to reconnect it with the anode. This reactivates the lithium so it can participate in the life of the battery. Our findings also have wide implications for the design and development of more robust lithium-metal batteries.

—Fang Liu

 

This work was funded by the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies under the Battery Materials Research (BMR), Battery 500 Consortium and eXtreme Fast Charge Cell Evaluation of Li-ion batteries (XCEL) programs.

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/12/20211223-slac.html

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9 hours ago, ronwagn said:

Bullshit set up by the FBI. The same FBI that did not investigate the bombers of 911.

Who Invaded the Capitol Building?

https://docs.google.com/document/d/19qLxuaWqyPKPsE7xyT2ATV6-I9J_BhfvkChb3E-NL4o/edit

 

sounds like revisionism:

https://apnews.com/article/television-donald-trump-washington-conspiracy-theories-congress-0ddc173391135ac2cdaa335e3c9b4881

 

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On 12/28/2021 at 3:55 PM, Eyes Wide Open said:

It is extraordinary to see such a event. How can Eropean leadership be so gullible? 

Have you never seen or heard Boris before?

The man is a total idiot

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9 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

it won a Nobel prize for deworming, covid is not a worm. You are an idiot.

https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/news/ivermectin-principle-trial-covid/

The drug, which is known to exhibit antiviral properties, reduced SARS-CoV-2 replication in laboratory studies.

You're a pedantic slobby faced old clown. 

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5 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Have you never seen or heard Boris before?

The man is a total idiot

Frankly I no longer follow world new any longer. It's a very difficult here in the states to accomplish.

With that being said the US has its own complex set of issues, and they run very deep and are quite disturbing. Good luck out there.

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18 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Very simply because I believe it should be easy for everyone to vote and I don't support attempting a coup if my side loses the election, basically the definition of democracy. The definition of arrogance is not being able to accept that you lost even after all your stupid audits concluded that you lost.

While you are quite correct Trump did lose, actually that was a misstatement. America lost, along with that our constitution was violated, our justice sysytem all being sanctioned by a corrupt Democratic party and free press. 

After 5 yrs the final chapter of the Russian/Collusion hoax the final chapter is being written...

Media Cowardice and the Collusion Hoax

What happens when the press becomes an interest group whose interest isn’t the truth?

To many hack commentators, “conspiracy theory” has become a term used to make certain kinds of implicit and explicit cooperation unacknowledgeable.

With evidence newly in hand last week, we see that the resources poured into promoting the Steele dossier before the 2016 election were nothing next to those mobilized by Clinton campaign chief John Podesta after the inauguration. Transcripts two years old show various Obama officials denying under oath that they possessed evidence of Trump-Russia collusion while they implied the opposite on TV.

Even the outside firm that the FBI relied on for its claim that Democratic emails were hacked by the Russians admitted under oath to finding no evidence that emails had been actually removed from Democratic servers

https://www.wsj.com/articles/media-cowardice-and-the-collusion-hoax-11590186850

Durham Cracks the Russia Case

The special counsel’s indictment tells the real story of 2016 collusion.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/john-durham-cracks-the-russia-case-fbi-michael-sussmann-clinton-campaign-11631917159

Six degrees of Brookings Institution’: Jonathan Turley calls think tank Steele dossier nexus

Dossier critic Fiona Hill introduced main source to Steele — and, Durham says, 'PR Exec-1'

The FBI wrote, “Steele said Fiona Hill knows that the primary subsource,” Danchenko, "was involved in the dossier,” and “when the primary subsource went to ground in January and February 2017, Steele contacted Hill and told Hill that he was worried about the primary subsource."

“I have no knowledge whatsoever of how he developed that dossier — none,” Hill said in 2019.

Danchenko previously cast doubt on Steele’s claims that Hill had been aware of his dossier work up until the time public disclosures of investigative materials revealed his role.

“I am not aware of any third party having any knowledge of any projects that I worked on in the private sector. ... I never shared any details of my work with anyone, including with Dr. Hill,” Danchenko told the Washington Examiner earlier this year. “To my knowledge, no one had been aware of my role in the Steele Dossier until my outing in July 2020." Durham’s indictment makes it clear numerous people were aware of Danchenko’s involvement.

https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/justice/dossier-critic-fiona-hill-introduced-main-source-to-steele-and-durham-says-pr-exec-1

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15 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

You are really scraping the bottom of the barrel. The 10 people who live in such ridiculous places are welcome to keep driving their plug in hybrids.

The number one EV market in the world is Norway, not exactly tropical.

Off-topic, Jay. The question is miles per charge, and the problems of cold weather.

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(edited)

Coal prices are surging upwards, a strong market.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Coal/Coal-Price-Set-To-Surge-As-Major-Producer-Indonesia-Bans-Exports.html

"Coal has rallied substantially this year amid higher energy demand and tight supplies of natural gas, and coal exporters have enjoyed windfall profits as the world—even Europe—reverses its negative stance on the most polluting fossil fuel. The rally was ignited by China, which effectively banned imports from Australia amid surging energy demand, although it was later forced to restart purchases of Australian coal.

However, this has also sparked concern about the security of supply, and for Indonesia specifically, it caused lower than usual inventory levels, which was the reason for the proposed ban, as the government worried about the risk of widespread blackouts.

Indonesia already has a protective mechanism to secure domestic supply. It is called a Domestic Market Obligation policy that stipulates coal miners active in the country must supply 25 percent of their output to state utility Perusahaan Listrik Negara, at a maximum fixed price of $70 per ton. To compare, the benchmark Newcastle coal is trading at above $150 per ton at the moment."

Edited by Ecocharger
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7 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

SLAC, Stanford researchers revitalize batteries by bringing ‘dead’ lithium back to life

23 December 2021

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University may have found a way to revitalize rechargeable lithium batteries, potentially boosting the range of electric vehicles and battery life in next-gen electronic devices.

As lithium batteries cycle, they accumulate little islands of inactive lithium that are cut off from the electrodes, decreasing the battery’s capacity to store charge. But the research team discovered that they could make this “dead” lithium creep like a worm toward one of the electrodes until it reconnects, partially reversing the unwanted process.

Resurrecting_lithium_sv_movement_final_highres

When an island of inactivated lithium metal travels to a battery’s anode, or negative electrode, and reconnects, it comes back to life, contributing electrons to the battery’s current flow and lithium ions for storing charge until it’s needed. The island moves by adding lithium metal at one end (blue) and dissolving it at the other end (red). Researchers from SLAC and Stanford discovered that they could drive the island’s growth in the direction of the anode by adding a brief, high-current discharging step right after the battery charges. Reconnecting the island to the anode increased the lifetime of their lithium-ion test cell by nearly 30%. Credit: Greg Stewart/SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory


Adding this extra step slowed the degradation of their test battery and increased its lifetime by nearly 30%. A study on the work is published in Nature.

We are now exploring the potential recovery of lost capacity in lithium-ion batteries using an extremely fast discharging step.

—Stanford postdoctoral fellow Fang Liu, lead author

 

A great deal of research is looking for ways to make rechargeable batteries with lighter weight, longer lifetimes, improved safety, and faster charging speeds than the lithium-ion technology currently used in cellphones, laptops and electric vehicles. A particular focus is on developing lithium-metal batteries, which could store more energy per volume or weight. For example, in electric cars, these next-generation batteries could increase the mileage per charge and possibly take up less trunk space.

Both battery types use positively charged lithium ions that shuttle back and forth between the electrodes. Over time, some of the metallic lithium becomes electrochemically inactive, forming isolated islands of lithium that no longer connect with the electrodes. This results in a loss of capacity and is a particular problem for lithium-metal technology and for the fast charging of lithium-ion batteries.

However, in the new study, the researchers demonstrated that they could mobilize and recover the isolated lithium to extend battery life.

I always thought of isolated lithium as bad, since it causes batteries to decay and even catch on fire. But we have discovered how to electrically reconnect this ‘dead’ lithium with the negative electrode to reactivate it.

—Yi Cui, a professor at Stanford and SLAC and investigator with the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Research (SIMES) who led the research

 

The idea for the study was born when Cui speculated that applying a voltage to a battery’s cathode and anode could make an isolated island of lithium physically move between the electrodes—a process his team has now confirmed with their experiments.

The scientists fabricated an optical cell with a lithium-nickel-manganese-cobalt-oxide (NMC) cathode, a lithium anode and an isolated lithium island in between. This test device allowed them to track in real time what happens inside a battery when in use.

They discovered that the isolated lithium island wasn’t “dead” at all but responded to battery operations. When charging the cell, the island slowly moved towards the cathode; when discharging, it crept in the opposite direction.

It’s like a very slow worm that inches its head forward and pulls its tail in to move nanometer by nanometer. In this case, it transports by dissolving away on one end and depositing material to the other end. If we can keep the lithium worm moving, it will eventually touch the anode and reestablish the electrical connection.

—Yi Cui

 

The results, which the scientists validated with other test batteries and through computer simulations, also demonstrate how isolated lithium could be recovered in a real battery by modifying the charging protocol.

We found that we can move the detached lithium toward the anode during discharging, and these motions are faster under higher currents. So we added a fast, high-current discharging step right after the battery charges, which moved the isolated lithium far enough to reconnect it with the anode. This reactivates the lithium so it can participate in the life of the battery. Our findings also have wide implications for the design and development of more robust lithium-metal batteries.

—Fang Liu

 

This work was funded by the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Vehicle Technologies under the Battery Materials Research (BMR), Battery 500 Consortium and eXtreme Fast Charge Cell Evaluation of Li-ion batteries (XCEL) programs.

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2021/12/20211223-slac.html

Early stage stuff, a lot of "could's" and "might's"...report on progress in a few years.

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10 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

You mean the way Tesla's sales just keep exploding:

image.thumb.png.321b7af5282676f5ee0684014939504d.png

 

Another off-topic chart, Jay....I was referring to a problem for EVs. In this case, a surprise $10,000 bill to replace the battery.

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(edited)

15 hours ago, notsonice said:

what a joke , the goof ball ran the car for 7.3 hours and drove only 109 Miles..

2:09 Starting the drive
3:52 50% charge dissipated
8:02 90% charge dissipated
9:27 End of drive

 

 

 He traveled 109 miles in 7.3 hours???? How many miles ,to the gallon ,do you get sitting in your car for 7.3 hours in bitter cold temp with the heat blasting away while parked?  10? How long does a full tank of gas last while parked,running and  in the bitter cold? 

What makes you think that it was running while parked? I do not see that in the description.

Here are more range tests of EVs, not very good. Why advertise something which does not happen? Funny.

https://insideevs.com/reviews/category/range-test/

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

19 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Especially when Trump sold out our Kurdish allies.

Now Now Mckinsey plzz stay in reality then again you do have a propensity to live in a altered time line...or perhaps zone would be more concise. Trump gave the Kurds the oilfields and revenue. Biden gave them back to the Irainians.

Little-known U.S. firm secures deal for Syrian oil

Former diplomat and special forces soldier got green light to work with Kurds to develop crude in northeastern Syria.

An American company has inked a contract with Kurdish authorities in northeastern Syria to develop and export the region’s crude oil under a secretive deal approved by the U.S. government months after President Donald Trump announced he was leaving U.S. troops to “secure the oil,” multiple people familiar with the project told POLITICO.

The agreement reached by a little-known firm helmed by politically connected former military and diplomatic officials has already angered the government of Syrian President Bashar Assad, which does not recognize the Kurdish authorities as autonomous. The Syrian Foreign Minister called the deal illegal and said it is aimed at “stealing” Syria’s crude.

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/08/03/delta-crescent-energy-syrian-oil-391033

 
 
 
 
Edited by Eyes Wide Open
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Biden ending Trump OK for US oil company in Syria, says official

Biden administration officials, during a visit this month to northeast Syria, stressed to Kurdish administrators overseeing the area that the U.S. military presence was exclusively focused on preventing an ISIS resurgence, according to a State Department official who was not authorized the discuss the matter publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The news site Al-Monitor was first to report of the administration’s decision to end the waiver.

https://www.militarytimes.com/news/pentagon-congress/2021/05/27/biden-ending-trump-ok-for-us-oil-company-in-syria-says-official/

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6 hours ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/news/ivermectin-principle-trial-covid/

The drug, which is known to exhibit antiviral properties, reduced SARS-CoV-2 replication in laboratory studies.

You're a pedantic slobby faced old clown. 

bleach does the same , I bet gasoline would also kill covid. How many brain cells have you killed huffing gas in a bag? You obviously to not have too many brain cells left. Taking dewormer is just another brain dead fix no different than those who huff bleach or inject it.

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3 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

What makes you think that it was running while parked? I do not see that in the description.

Here are more range tests of EVs, not very good. Why advertise something which does not happen? Funny.

https://insideevs.com/reviews/category/range-test/

7.3 hour drive and the guy only went 109 miles? and you buy the guys BS. Enjoy

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