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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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On 1/7/2022 at 11:55 PM, ronwagn said:

How do they tax electric vehicles and the miles they put on roads? Does the government give rebates? Britain doesn't even have enough electricity now. 

????

We do Ron, we havent experienced any blackouts (other than storms) for over a decade.

This is the UK's company car tax benefits for 2022, there are approx 900,000 company car drivers in the uk and to have anything other than hybrid or all electric makes no sense.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/company-car-benefit-the-appropriate-percentage-480-appendix-2

https://www.carwow.co.uk/blog/electric-car-tax?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=71700000088684460&utm_group=58700007512213075&utm_keyword=&utm_term=DYNAMIC+SEARCH+ADS&network=s&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIxOmKwfum9QIVaJBoCR2IcACIEAAYASAAEgKAIPD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

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On 1/7/2022 at 10:52 PM, Boat said:

You may own a driverless shopping cart that picks up goods, brings them to the house. After unloading you send it out for service, a car wash, go recharge then pick up the kids on the way home. Your cart may inform you of its schedule for the day. Lol

Whats the difference between this and buy on line and get it delivered, other than the cost of the driver which is almost nothing?

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On 1/8/2022 at 12:22 AM, ronwagn said:

Not now though, they will suffer through owning an EV. 

At present there is no electricity shortage at all even with almost record low levels of wind power. Yes the cost of that electricity is very high due to our reliance on gas and the current gas price. Even with higher electricity costs you will save a fortune compared to ICE vehicle fuel costs.

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4 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

At present there is no electricity shortage at all even with almost record low levels of wind power. Yes the cost of that electricity is very high due to our reliance on gas and the current gas price. Even with higher electricity costs you will save a fortune compared to ICE vehicle fuel costs.

Only due to exorbitant taxes on gasoline and diesel though. While EVs are funded with rebates. If that is what their voters want, then that is OK with me. I certainly would not. Britain is small and we are large, so it is apples and oranges. 

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4 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

At present there is no electricity shortage at all even with almost record low levels of wind power. Yes the cost of that electricity is very high due to our reliance on gas and the current gas price. Even with higher electricity costs you will save a fortune compared to ICE vehicle fuel costs.

I am glad you are OK with your situation. If you have the energy from wind you are going to be living a green dream. I visited London about 1965. I wish I would have had time to visit the whole country. I am glad to hear that offshore turbines have taken off. I would hate to see them all over the scenic areas. 

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(edited)

11 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

I am glad you are OK with your situation. If you have the energy from wind you are going to be living a green dream. I visited London about 1965. I wish I would have had time to visit the whole country. I am glad to hear that offshore turbines have taken off. I would hate to see them all over the scenic areas. 

No i never said I was happy with it just that there isnt a shortage yet, as i type this we are exporting 1.1GW.

We are far too reliant on gas and our remaining coal stations are closing by 2024 and many of our old nuc stations are set to close very soon so we may be in trouble in the near future. There has been no joined up thinking in the UK about all our generating options and when the wind doesnt blow we pay through the nose for gas. The green policies will come back to haunt us unless we are very very lucky and start diversifying into more nuclear new builds. Its too little too late at the moment.

Storage will play a major part for us but I havent heard of any large scale battery storage facilities being constructed.

Edited by Rob Plant
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9 hours ago, notsonice said:

you love to cherry pick facts....you find one that fits your bs Babble and post it.....

 

here is the worlds latest report .....on a global basis....

I will let you post January and February, when they come out,  from the same site.........Can you stand to eat crow?

 

PS please note the global average temperature..........4th highest on record.......December will be in the top 3?

 /monitoring-content/sotc/global/extremes/extremes-202111.png

And record lows worldwide...your own source is what?

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(edited)

Here is the brick wall which is blocking the Green Dream, and it will become a major impediment for any sizeable penetration of the EVs into the auto market.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Record-High-Lithium-Prices-Are-Here-To-Stay.html

"The price for lithium is hitting fresh record highs as the parabolic growth in the electrification of vehicles by major automakers increases demand.

Mining companies worldwide are scrambling to increase production and develop new sources of the world's lightest metal.

China, the largest battery-producing country, reported last week that the benchmark price of lithium carbonate was about 300,000 yuan (just over $47k per ton), an increase of about six times from January 2021. Soaring prices come as electric-car makers, such as Tesla, report exponential growth in the US, Europe, and China. 

Lithium is one of the essential elements in battery technology powering electric vehicles that steadily replace combustion engines. As the share of electric cars increases, demand for lithium will increase; thus, conventional wisdom would suggest lithium prices will remain elevated until the battery industry develops new mining projects to expand output. 

According to Bloomberg NEF, global electric car sales were about 5.6 million in 2021, up from 3.1 million in 2020. The significant increase in sales is due to soaring Chinese demand (as shown in the chart above). Further electric car sales in 2022 will only suggest the demand for lithium will outstrip production and deplete stockpiles, helping to keep prices high. "

Edited by Ecocharger
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1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

And record lows worldwide...your own source is what?

And record lows worldwide...your own source is what?????? .....your babble not mine....you never back up your claims with real facts .......just a few cherry picked low temperatures in bum fuck nowhere. Once again you can post the average global temps for Dec (available sometime later this month )and Jan. They will be available from NOAA. If you never heard of NOAA I will spell it out for you  .......National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. I myself look at real numbers and history for the world not babbling about the temperature in Russia for 3 days.

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1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

Here is the brick wall which is blocking the Green Dream, and it will become a major impediment for any sizeable penetration of the EVs into the auto market.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Record-High-Lithium-Prices-Are-Here-To-Stay.html

"The price for lithium is hitting fresh record highs as the parabolic growth in the electrification of vehicles by major automakers increases demand.

Mining companies worldwide are scrambling to increase production and develop new sources of the world's lightest metal.

China, the largest battery-producing country, reported last week that the benchmark price of lithium carbonate was about 300,000 yuan (just over $47k per ton), an increase of about six times from January 2021. Soaring prices come as electric-car makers, such as Tesla, report exponential growth in the US, Europe, and China. 

Lithium is one of the essential elements in battery technology powering electric vehicles that steadily replace combustion engines. As the share of electric cars increases, demand for lithium will increase; thus, conventional wisdom would suggest lithium prices will remain elevated until the battery industry develops new mining projects to expand output. 

According to Bloomberg NEF, global electric car sales were about 5.6 million in 2021, up from 3.1 million in 2020. The significant increase in sales is due to soaring Chinese demand (as shown in the chart above). Further electric car sales in 2022 will only suggest the demand for lithium will outstrip production and deplete stockpiles, helping to keep prices high. "

Been out on the Salt Flats lately????????............Massive reserves ......some of it already stockpiled in waste piles ... that are loaded with Lithium. Production has already started at 2 sites and the third one is now in drilling stages

 

 

silver-peak-lithium-mine-southern-nevada.jpg

 

Anson Resources aims to drill lithium bromine production wells next quarter at Paradox Brine Project in Utah

Anson is targeting bore drilling for the first quarter of 2022 following the completion of earthworks and access roads for the Paradox lithium bromide brine project in Utah.

Anson Resources Ltd - Anson Resources aiming to drill lithium bromine productions wells in Q1 2022 for the Paradox Brine Project in Utah
Preparation works nearing completion at the LCW-1 drill pad location
 

Anson Resources Ltd (ASX:ASN) is working toward completing lithium bromine production wells at the Paradox Project in Utah, with drilling scheduled for the first quarter of 2022 following the rapid completion of site works.

The company had already moved to mobilise equipment to the site, just a week after receiving approval from the Utah State Government.

Earthworks and two access roads for the large trucks required to transport the drill rig to site have now been completed, just two months later.

These preparations allow access to where drill pads are slated to be constructed, bores LCW-1 and LCW-2. The planned production wells are on the Little Utah lease, which covers 80 acres and was granted to Anson by the Utah State government earlier this year.

 

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16 minutes ago, notsonice said:

And record lows worldwide...your own source is what?????? .....your babble not mine....you never back up your claims with real facts .......just a few cherry picked low temperatures in bum fuck nowhere. Once again you can post the average global temps for Dec (available sometime later this month )and Jan. They will be available from NOAA. If you never heard of NOAA I will spell it out for you  .......National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. I myself look at real numbers and history for the world not babbling about the temperature in Russia for 3 days.

Here is reality, USCRN(no fraud city temp data) has seen zero increase in temperatures for 15 years now.  IF actual pristine temperature data set is not good enough for you.... You can look up average first/last frost data across the world which literally cannot be screwed with as farmers must have said data and you can see that No, things are not warming up, in North America, or Europe compared to their claims over same time frame as used above.  The two claims should follow each other perfectly.  Satellite data even with moving said graph to top of its error bars back in 2015/2016 has seen zero warming for 5 years and if your remove that fraud, nearly 10 years.

Ah yes, NOAA who has continually been caught red handed changing weather station data to lower temps around the world is your standard???  And then reposting said data as if it RAW... Latest caught FRAUDULENTLY changing data after being caught red handed screwing over Iceland was lowering SE USA weather station temps as they needed some more cooling to get "hottest year on record".  Why the SE USA matters ... because the USA has the oldest temp records across a big area which is used near exclusively to make said claims about "hottest" on record. Once caught, did they revert back?  Oh HELL NO.  Amazing how EVERY SINGLE time it is always DOWN on old temperature data and never up.  As if people 100 years ago cannot read a thermometer. 

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3 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

No i never said I was happy with it just that there isnt a shortage yet, as i type this we are exporting 1.1GW.

We are far too reliant on gas and our remaining coal stations are closing by 2024 and many of our old nuc stations are set to close very soon so we may be in trouble in the near future. There has been no joined up thinking in the UK about all our generating options and when the wind doesnt blow we pay through the nose for gas. The green policies will come back to haunt us unless we are very very lucky and start diversifying into more nuclear new builds. Its too little too late at the moment.

Storage will play a major part for us but I havent heard of any large scale battery storage facilities being constructed. 

There is plenty of natural gas all over the world, and methane hydrates are all over the place near you. It is just a matter of producing it. Your coal can also be made into liquid fuel or burned the usual way. No need to go crazy rushing the green dream. 

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1 hour ago, notsonice said:

And record lows worldwide...your own source is what?????? .....your babble not mine....you never back up your claims with real facts .......just a few cherry picked low temperatures in bum fuck nowhere. Once again you can post the average global temps for Dec (available sometime later this month )and Jan. They will be available from NOAA. If you never heard of NOAA I will spell it out for you  .......National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. I myself look at real numbers and history for the world not babbling about the temperature in Russia for 3 days.

Can you read the news?

https://abcnews.go.com/WNT/video/seasons-1st-major-snowstorm-strikes-northeast-82142577

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coal in US 2021 a dead cat bounce....coal in the US 2022 getting replaced slowly but surely

 

 

January 10, 2022

Solar power will account for nearly half of new U.S. electric generating capacity in 2022

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generating capacity additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

In 2022, we expect 46.1 gigawatts (GW) of new utility-scale electric generating capacity to be added to the U.S. power grid, according to our Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory. Almost half of the planned 2022 capacity additions are solar, followed by natural gas at 21% and wind at 17%.

Developers and power plant owners report planned additions to us in our annual and monthly electric generator surveys. In the annual survey, we ask respondents to provide planned online dates for generators coming online in the next five years. The monthly survey tracks the status of generators coming online based on reported in-service dates.

Solar. We expect U.S. utility-scale solar generating capacity to grow by 21.5 GW in 2022. This planned new capacity would surpass last year’s 15.5 GW of solar capacity additions, an estimate based on reported additions through October (8.7 GW) and additions scheduled for the last two months of 2021 (6.9 GW). Most planned solar additions in 2022 will be in Texas (6.1 GW, or 28% of the national total), followed by California (4.0 GW).

Natural gas. In 2022, we expect 9.6 GW of new natural gas-fired capacity to come online. Combined-cycle plants account for 8.1 GW of the planned capacity additions (over 84%), and combustion-turbine plants account for 1.4 GW. Almost all (88%) of the planned natural gas capacity is located in Ohio, Florida, Michigan, and Illinois.

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generator additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Wind. In 2021, a record-high 17.1 GW of wind capacity came online in the United States. We based this estimate on reported additions through October (9.9 GW) and planned additions in November and December (7.2 GW). Another 7.6 GW of wind capacity is scheduled to come online in 2022. About half (51%) of the 2022 wind capacity additions are located in Texas. The 999 MW Traverse Wind Energy Center in Oklahoma, the largest wind project expected to come online in 2022, is scheduled to begin commercial operations in April.

Battery storage. We expect U.S. utility-scale battery storage capacity to grow by 5.1 GW, or 84%, in 2022. Several factors have helped expand U.S. battery storage, including declining costs of battery storage, deploying battery storage with renewable generation, and adding value through regional transmission organization (RTO) markets.

Nuclear. Another 5% of the country’s planned electric capacity additions in 2022 will come from two new reactors at the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia. One of these reactors, Unit 3, was expected to come online in 2021, but the unit’s planned start date was delayed until June 2022 to allow additional time for construction and testing.

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1 hour ago, notsonice said:

Been out on the Salt Flats lately????????............Massive reserves ......some of it already stockpiled in waste piles ... that are loaded with Lithium. Production has already started at 2 sites and the third one is now in drilling stages

 

 

silver-peak-lithium-mine-southern-nevada.jpg

 

Anson Resources aims to drill lithium bromine production wells next quarter at Paradox Brine Project in Utah

Anson is targeting bore drilling for the first quarter of 2022 following the completion of earthworks and access roads for the Paradox lithium bromide brine project in Utah.

Anson Resources Ltd - Anson Resources aiming to drill lithium bromine productions wells in Q1 2022 for the Paradox Brine Project in Utah
Preparation works nearing completion at the LCW-1 drill pad location
 

Anson Resources Ltd (ASX:ASN) is working toward completing lithium bromine production wells at the Paradox Project in Utah, with drilling scheduled for the first quarter of 2022 following the rapid completion of site works.

The company had already moved to mobilise equipment to the site, just a week after receiving approval from the Utah State Government.

Earthworks and two access roads for the large trucks required to transport the drill rig to site have now been completed, just two months later.

These preparations allow access to where drill pads are slated to be constructed, bores LCW-1 and LCW-2. The planned production wells are on the Little Utah lease, which covers 80 acres and was granted to Anson by the Utah State government earlier this year.

 

As usual, you missed the point. The market as a whole will see exponential price increases.

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1 minute ago, notsonice said:

coal in US 2021 a dead cat bounce....coal in the US 2022 getting replaced slowly but surely

 

 

January 10, 2022

Solar power will account for nearly half of new U.S. electric generating capacity in 2022

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generating capacity additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

In 2022, we expect 46.1 gigawatts (GW) of new utility-scale electric generating capacity to be added to the U.S. power grid, according to our Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory. Almost half of the planned 2022 capacity additions are solar, followed by natural gas at 21% and wind at 17%.

Developers and power plant owners report planned additions to us in our annual and monthly electric generator surveys. In the annual survey, we ask respondents to provide planned online dates for generators coming online in the next five years. The monthly survey tracks the status of generators coming online based on reported in-service dates.

Solar. We expect U.S. utility-scale solar generating capacity to grow by 21.5 GW in 2022. This planned new capacity would surpass last year’s 15.5 GW of solar capacity additions, an estimate based on reported additions through October (8.7 GW) and additions scheduled for the last two months of 2021 (6.9 GW). Most planned solar additions in 2022 will be in Texas (6.1 GW, or 28% of the national total), followed by California (4.0 GW).

Natural gas. In 2022, we expect 9.6 GW of new natural gas-fired capacity to come online. Combined-cycle plants account for 8.1 GW of the planned capacity additions (over 84%), and combustion-turbine plants account for 1.4 GW. Almost all (88%) of the planned natural gas capacity is located in Ohio, Florida, Michigan, and Illinois.

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generator additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Wind. In 2021, a record-high 17.1 GW of wind capacity came online in the United States. We based this estimate on reported additions through October (9.9 GW) and planned additions in November and December (7.2 GW). Another 7.6 GW of wind capacity is scheduled to come online in 2022. About half (51%) of the 2022 wind capacity additions are located in Texas. The 999 MW Traverse Wind Energy Center in Oklahoma, the largest wind project expected to come online in 2022, is scheduled to begin commercial operations in April.

Battery storage. We expect U.S. utility-scale battery storage capacity to grow by 5.1 GW, or 84%, in 2022. Several factors have helped expand U.S. battery storage, including declining costs of battery storage, deploying battery storage with renewable generation, and adding value through regional transmission organization (RTO) markets.

Nuclear. Another 5% of the country’s planned electric capacity additions in 2022 will come from two new reactors at the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia. One of these reactors, Unit 3, was expected to come online in 2021, but the unit’s planned start date was delayed until June 2022 to allow additional time for construction and testing.

Fine, if you want to see your standard of living catastrophically decline, ban coal.

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Just now, Ecocharger said:

As usual, you missed the point. The market as a whole will see exponential price increases.

production in the US is ramping up to meet the demand.....Enjoy the thought

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(edited)

5 minutes ago, notsonice said:

a snow storm and you are getting excited????? Do you get a snow day and you do not have to go to school?

A snow storm and cold snap blanketing the U.S. from Maine to Virginia. 

The mandate of the NOAA includes a direction  "to research the phenomenon of global warming and climate change."

So this is not a neutral research mandate, but a government-ordered task to support the Green agenda. Agenda-based science is NOT science.

Edited by Ecocharger
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7 minutes ago, notsonice said:

production in the US is ramping up to meet the demand.....Enjoy the thought

No, the prices of Lithium are rising exponentially, see my post above.

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29 minutes ago, notsonice said:

coal in US 2021 a dead cat bounce....coal in the US 2022 getting replaced slowly but surely

 

 

January 10, 2022

Solar power will account for nearly half of new U.S. electric generating capacity in 2022

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generating capacity additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

In 2022, we expect 46.1 gigawatts (GW) of new utility-scale electric generating capacity to be added to the U.S. power grid, according to our Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory. Almost half of the planned 2022 capacity additions are solar, followed by natural gas at 21% and wind at 17%.

Developers and power plant owners report planned additions to us in our annual and monthly electric generator surveys. In the annual survey, we ask respondents to provide planned online dates for generators coming online in the next five years. The monthly survey tracks the status of generators coming online based on reported in-service dates.

Solar. We expect U.S. utility-scale solar generating capacity to grow by 21.5 GW in 2022. This planned new capacity would surpass last year’s 15.5 GW of solar capacity additions, an estimate based on reported additions through October (8.7 GW) and additions scheduled for the last two months of 2021 (6.9 GW). Most planned solar additions in 2022 will be in Texas (6.1 GW, or 28% of the national total), followed by California (4.0 GW).

Natural gas. In 2022, we expect 9.6 GW of new natural gas-fired capacity to come online. Combined-cycle plants account for 8.1 GW of the planned capacity additions (over 84%), and combustion-turbine plants account for 1.4 GW. Almost all (88%) of the planned natural gas capacity is located in Ohio, Florida, Michigan, and Illinois.

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generator additions

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Wind. In 2021, a record-high 17.1 GW of wind capacity came online in the United States. We based this estimate on reported additions through October (9.9 GW) and planned additions in November and December (7.2 GW). Another 7.6 GW of wind capacity is scheduled to come online in 2022. About half (51%) of the 2022 wind capacity additions are located in Texas. The 999 MW Traverse Wind Energy Center in Oklahoma, the largest wind project expected to come online in 2022, is scheduled to begin commercial operations in April.

Battery storage. We expect U.S. utility-scale battery storage capacity to grow by 5.1 GW, or 84%, in 2022. Several factors have helped expand U.S. battery storage, including declining costs of battery storage, deploying battery storage with renewable generation, and adding value through regional transmission organization (RTO) markets.

Nuclear. Another 5% of the country’s planned electric capacity additions in 2022 will come from two new reactors at the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia. One of these reactors, Unit 3, was expected to come online in 2021, but the unit’s planned start date was delayed until June 2022 to allow additional time for construction and testing.

Ironically, a significant chunk of that solar in Texas is to power oil and gas production equipment.  In the permian basin (the yellow spots in the west of Texas) and the eagleford basin (the ones in the southern tip) there have been a lot of production shut ins and upsets caused by inadequate electric power to production areas which do not have access to grid electrical systems.  The companies in these areas are installing solar and batteries at a furious rate to prevent these costly problems.  If anything the dots probably understate the capacity being installed, because a large part of it is not going to be connected to an external grid at this time.  

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(edited)

56 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Fine, if you want to see your standard of living catastrophically decline, ban coal.

Coal is increasingly important for America.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/US-Emissions-Jumped-In-2021-As-Coal-Power-Generation-Surged.html

"U.S. greenhouse gas emissions surged by 6.2 percent in 2021 compared to 2020, Rhodium Group said in its preliminary estimates, which put the United States further off track to achieve the Biden Administration's climate goals.

Emissions remained 5 percent below pre-pandemic levels, Rhodium Group said, but noted that greenhouse gas emissions rose faster than the growth in U.S. economy last year, largely due to a jump in coal-fired power generation, which increased by 17 percent from 2020, and a rapid rebound in road transportation, primarily freight.

The electric power sector, which accounts for 28 percent of net U.S. emissions, saw the second-largest increase in GHG emissions from 2020 levels. Last year, emissions from the electric power sector rose by 6 percent compared to the previous year, but they were still 4 percent lower than 2019 levels. The sector's increase in emissions was due to a sharp rise in coal generation, which rose for the first time year-over-year since 2014, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, Rhodium Group said."

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

Natural gas prices are rising again, caused by the increasing reliance of Europe on fossil fuels. Cold weather and Russian problems are blamed.

Also, the Green hysteria of wild-eyed government leaders in panic.

Those "cold snaps" appear to be springing up all over the world.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Europes-Gas-Prices-Rise-On-Muted-Russian-Supply-Cold-Weather.html

"Apart from limited Russian supply, European gas prices reflected on Monday lower wind power output and expectations of colder weather in the UK and northwest Europe later this week.

European gas prices returned to rising this week, after losing around 9 percent on Friday, following the Netherlands’ announcement on Thursday that it might need more gas to be pumped at the Groningen gas field in the north of the country. The Dutch government says that more gas needs to be extracted from the Groningen gas field in 2022 to ensure supply because of long-term export contracts with Germany and a delay in the commissioning of a facility in the Netherlands to treat imported gas for use for Dutch households.

Following a decline in Europe’s benchmark gas prices after Christmas due to the high number of LNG cargoes headed its way, the new year began with prices soaring again as gas deliveries from Russia via Ukraine and Poland continue to be low while another cold snap made its way to Europe."

Edited by Ecocharger

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8 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

No i never said I was happy with it just that there isnt a shortage yet, as i type this we are exporting 1.1GW.

We are far too reliant on gas and our remaining coal stations are closing by 2024 and many of our old nuc stations are set to close very soon so we may be in trouble in the near future. There has been no joined up thinking in the UK about all our generating options and when the wind doesnt blow we pay through the nose for gas. The green policies will come back to haunt us unless we are very very lucky and start diversifying into more nuclear new builds. Its too little too late at the moment.

Storage will play a major part for us but I havent heard of any large scale battery storage facilities being constructed.

Indeed Rob, as I have said before, the whole of Europe has been very slow with battery storage, not to mention Hydrogen production. The Germans have got the message though, and are investing heavily in both right now.

 

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3 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Natural gas prices are rising again, caused by the increasing reliance of Europe on fossil fuels. Cold weather and Russian problems are blamed.

Also, the Green hysteria of wild-eyed government leaders in panic.

Those "cold snaps" appear to be springing up all over the world.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Europes-Gas-Prices-Rise-On-Muted-Russian-Supply-Cold-Weather.html

"Apart from limited Russian supply, European gas prices reflected on Monday lower wind power output and expectations of colder weather in the UK and northwest Europe later this week.

European gas prices returned to rising this week, after losing around 9 percent on Friday, following the Netherlands’ announcement on Thursday that it might need more gas to be pumped at the Groningen gas field in the north of the country. The Dutch government says that more gas needs to be extracted from the Groningen gas field in 2022 to ensure supply because of long-term export contracts with Germany and a delay in the commissioning of a facility in the Netherlands to treat imported gas for use for Dutch households.

Following a decline in Europe’s benchmark gas prices after Christmas due to the high number of LNG cargoes headed its way, the new year began with prices soaring again as gas deliveries from Russia via Ukraine and Poland continue to be low while another cold snap made its way to Europe."

The Euro gas crisis actually has it's origins in the disagreement between Morocco and Algeria last year, which closed one of the main pipeline supplying Europe. Of course, very silly of Germany to close half their nuclear in the midst of the crises, and very silly of Putin to take advantage of the situation.

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