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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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2 hours ago, notsonice said:

the UP battery locos are destined for North Platte.....UPs maintenance/switching  yards...Heavily Urban North Platte??????? Last time I was in North Platte the rail yard looked like there was no urban area around it....Lots of space at the North Platte yards and for both directions miles and miles and miles for both solar and wind ....400 foot wide right away on the main line. North Platte is all UP.......its main employer....no one moans about what happens in the yards

I didn't catch that particular detail in the article.  I thought it was for switching yards in general, not a specific switch yard.

Edited by Eric Gagen

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(edited)

On 2/1/2022 at 7:32 AM, Boat said:

But the EPA can pressure the nation’s dirtiest coal plants to shut down through other means, and the administration is beginning to exercise its leverage.
“Regulations to require power producers to bear the costs of their own pollution are decades overdue,” said Thom Cmar, an attorney with the law firm AltmanNewman who represents environmental groups.

“Sound science makes it clear that we need to limit mercury and toxins in the air to protect children and vulnerable communities from dangerous pollution,” EPA Administrator Michael Regan said in a statement.

In my opinion the US should start with imported pollution. Sell it all to Europe. Maybe they can’t insulate but if it gets cold they will figure out how to burn it. 

Coal will become the go-to energy source now that natural gas prices are escalating world-wide.

Frigid temperatures are exposing the nonsensical climate theories which have fueled the anti-fossil fuel hysteria.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Natural-Gas/US-Natural-Gas-Prices-Jump-10-On-Arctic-Blast.html

"A cold blast sent U.S. natural gas prices soaring early on Wednesday.

Natural gas prices are surging as demand is expected to be high and very high through the weekend.

Ahead of this week’s expected winter storm, some analysts are concerned that natural gas production in parts of the Permian could be affected by the freeze."

 

Edited by Ecocharger
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7 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Coal will become the go-to energy source now that natural gas prices are escalating world-wide.

Frigid temperatures are exposing the nonsensical climate theories which have fueled the anti-fossil fuel hysteria.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Natural-Gas/US-Natural-Gas-Prices-Jump-10-On-Arctic-Blast.html

 

Coal will become the go-to energy source now that natural gas prices are escalating world-wide???? You should put your money where your mouth is an buy a coal mine.......You will be richhhhhher than Elon Musk. Reality check , you are not paying attention the fact that coal is not the go to energy source...it is the source of last resort. By the way have you seen many coal powered locomotives running regular service these days....I hear they are all the rage in North Korea.

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17 hours ago, ronwagn said:

Natural gas switchers have been used for several years also. 

https://www.railwayage.com/mechanical/locomotives/optifuel-producing-natural-gas-switchers/

OptiFuel’s new switcher line uses a proprietary, EPA rail-certified engine (KOFSG11.9400), which is based on the Cummins ISX12N and is said to have 0.00 g-bhp/hr NOx and PM criteria emissions.

Great idea ...20 years ago...maybe... They have not sold any to date...and I would not expect them to as they do not have regenerative braking as the battery locomotives do.

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4 minutes ago, notsonice said:

Coal will become the go-to energy source now that natural gas prices are escalating world-wide???? You should put your money where your mouth is an buy a coal mine.......You will be richhhhhher than Elon Musk. Reality check , you are not paying attention the fact that coal is not the go to energy source...it is the source of last resort. By the way have you seen many coal powered locomotives running regular service these days....I hear they are all the rage in North Korea.

Coal is being upgraded as a source of energy in China and India, worldwide coal production is now at an all-time high. 

That sounds pretty healthy to me.

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2 hours ago, kshithij Sharma said:

 

Electric trains are way better than diesel trains as electric energy generated in large plants is much more efficient than diesel generated energy on trains. Gas trains don't produce enough torque to pull trains. But your idea of battery operated trains is outrageous. The battery charging time makes it absurd.

Trains don't stop for 8 hours just like that. They generally travel for an entire day or two before halting. Crew change, refueling and pumping water only takes 30 minutes to an hour and doesn't need long duration halts. So, there is no time for charging batteries at all. Also, batteries need replacement every 4-5 years which make them ridiculously expensive and unsustainable. There is also risk of fire when large quantity of hot lithium batteries are stacked in a carriage which has the potential of gutting an entire train.

Most trains nowadays run on electricity directly from electric wires suspended above train tracks. But trains also have backup diesel engines for emergencies for cases where electric lines may have been damaged or for travelling in remote places where the tracks have not been electrified yet. There is no need to have unnecessary batteries. Having 2-3 carriages of batteries is a massive wastage and impractical.

But your idea of battery operated trains is outrageous. The battery charging time makes it absurd. ????? not my idea ...they are now in production. Enjoy the thought and the charging time......30  to 40 minutes the same as the time it takes to swap out a crew.

batteries need replacement every 4-5 years??? not Lithium iron which is what is being used in the locomotives....10000 charges, if you charge once a day gives you a  30 year life. And yes Trains do stop for crew changes just like that....I am 500 feet away from a main line crew change station.... at least a crew change every hour......You do realize even freight trains run on timetables ..

Very practical.....next time you post check into what you are babbling about first

Edited by notsonice

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(edited)

2 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Coal is being upgraded as a source of energy in China and India, worldwide coal production is now at an all-time high. 

That sounds pretty healthy to me.

You missed the press releases India is dumping coal and China is also working on it.  World wide coal production peaked in 2014 . 2021 is not the  peak year for production, it was at 7.9 billion. 2014 it was at 8.1 billion. Do you ever check your fake facts before babbling garbage?1024px-World_Coal_Consumption.svg.png

Edited by notsonice

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Coal is dead in the US....no new coal plants in the US....just demolitions

 

January 11, 2022

Coal will account for 85% of U.S. electric generating capacity retirements in 2022

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generating capacity retirements
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Operators have scheduled 14.9 gigawatts (GW) of electric generating capacity to retire in the United States during 2022, according to our latest inventory of electric generators. The majority of the scheduled retirements are coal-fired power plants (85%), followed by natural gas (8%) and nuclear (5%).

Coal. After substantial retirements of U.S. coal-fired electric generating capacity from 2015 to 2020 that averaged 11.0 GW a year, coal capacity retirements slowed to 4.6 GW in 2021. However, we expect retirement of coal-fired generators to increase again this year; 12.6 GW of coal capacity is scheduled to retire in 2022, or 6% of the coal-fired generating capacity that was operating at the end of 2021.

Most of the plants making up the operating U.S. coal fleet were built in the 1970s and 1980s. U.S. coal plants are retiring as the coal fleet ages and as coal-fired generators face increasing competition from natural gas and renewables.

The largest coal power plant planning to retire in 2022 is the 1,305-megawatt (MW) William H. Zimmer plant in Ohio. Morgantown Generating Station in Maryland plans to retire its two coal-fired units (1,205 MW combined) in June, followed by two of the plant’s six smaller petroleum-fired units in September.

Natural gas. In 2022, 1.2 GW of U.S. natural gas-fired capacity is scheduled for retirement. The retiring natural gas capacity is made up of older steam and combustion turbine units, which are less efficient and smaller than many of the newer combined-cycle units.

The largest U.S. natural gas plant planning to retire in 2022 is the Meramec power plant in Missouri. Meramec, which has four generating units, was originally a coal-fired plant. Two of the plant’s generators were converted to use natural gas in 2016. These units, as well as the plant’s two coal-fired units, plan to retire in December 2022.

Nuclear. At 0.8 GW, nuclear capacity retirements represent 5% of expected retirements in 2022 and less than 1% of the operating U.S. nuclear fleet. The retiring nuclear capacity comes from one plant, the Palisades nuclear power facility in Michigan. The retirement of Palisades is a result of historically low natural gas prices, limited growth in electricity demand, and increasing competition from renewable energy.

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generator retirements
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Power plant owners and operators report planned retirements to EIA in our annual and monthly electric generator surveys.

A previous Today in Energy article describes the 46.1 GW of generating capacity that developers plan to bring online in 2022.

Principal contributors: Elesia Fasching, Suparna Ray

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2 minutes ago, notsonice said:

You missed the press releases India is dumping coal and China is also working on it.  World wide coal production peaked in 2008 . 2021 is not the  peak year for production, it was at 7.9 billion. 2008 it was at 8.1 billion. Do you ever check your fake facts before babbling garbage?1024px-World_Coal_Consumption.svg.png

This graph by the way is a perfect example of what a 'real' peak in usage looks like for practically anything.  There is a long history of low level usage, then it becomes 'the thing' and usage goes up exponentially.  Forecasts are made that 'every person will be a 'coalminer/aircraft pilot/soybean farmer/telephone operator/bank clerk' or whatever.  Then the market gets saturated because the need for the thing in question is finally met.  It could stay at a relatively stable level following population growth, but in the vast majority of cases it then begins to drop, because something else has come along that works better (natural gas, jumbo jets with 2 crew, high efficiency farms, electric switchgear, ATM cards) and suddenly the last big thing is over with. 

Coal long ago passed the stage where it was 'the next big thing' roughly between 1830 and 1920, and from roughly 1950 - 2010 it was 'this big thing that nobody cares much about'  Now it's 'this big thing that is still around, but obviously going away' because there are so many good quality alternatives to it nowadays.  

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59 minutes ago, notsonice said:

Great idea ...20 years ago...maybe... They have not sold any to date...and I would not expect them to as they do not have regenerative braking as the battery locomotives do.

I would think that the price of the natural gas switchers would be much lower. Any existing switcher could be converted to natural gas. Same with any vehicle or engine of any kind. Quite an advantage. 

Europe has now deemed natural gas and nuclear as green energy sources, so electrical vehicles will not have as large a propaganda advantage. 

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3 hours ago, notsonice said:

Yep Overhead lines can be used to charge battery locos on the run........or on sidings.......You do realize trains stop every 8 hours on sidings to change crews/fuel up....plenty of time to charge up off an overhead line.......no need to have to wait for the diesel trucks to show up.....or nat gas....... In my neck of the woods we have a major rail siding that the trains are stacked up all the time waiting for the semis loaded with diesel to show up..... and to change crews.. They love to block the crossings for hours at a time. By law they can block traffic

We live a couple of hundred yards from a railroad crossing and on a small but well traveled road. We are fighting the longer trains all the time and have recently gotten good results. We have seen the problem for almost all the fifteen years we have lived here. A couple of times a year we have had to take secondary routes several miles out of the way because we didn't know how long the train would remain. 

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3 hours ago, notsonice said:

There is an electricity shortage in the US? maybe in Texas when it freezes. Right now there is excess capacity every night ...been that way for the last 100 years.....Natural Gas Locos???? what are you smoking??? Locos already are powered by electric drive traction motors.... Batteries store electricity ....Think about it??? and Locomotives haul 10,000 tons of freight plus the weight of the cars.....An extra 2 or 3 cars full of batteries is not going to impact the locomotives at all.....

LNG is very dense and can easily fuel locomotives. I have not seen any comparison to cost or utility. Overhead electric lines make sense too. Any of the above can do the job. The cost of the engines and the cost of the fuel and the cost of the overhead lines all need to be figured in. I doubt there are any good statistics. I don't smoke anything.😊

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55 minutes ago, notsonice said:

You missed the press releases India is dumping coal and China is also working on it.  World wide coal production peaked in 2008 . 2021 is not the  peak year for production, it was at 7.9 billion. 2008 it was at 8.1 billion. Do you ever check your fake facts before babbling garbage?1024px-World_Coal_Consumption.svg.png

Apparently you do not: India is massively ramping up coal production.  https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/coal-indias-production-rises-7-in-january-8020291.html

Future projections: https://www.climatescorecard.org/2019/05/coal-production-is-expanding-in-india/

https://madrascourier.com/environment/indias-plans-to-increase-coal-production-is-an-environmental-social-disaster/

Add Nigeria to that list... Any country that has coal and is developing will use coal and continue to do so. 

China not use coal?  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA  I have swamp land to sell you... Its going cheap, prime waterfront.  They have no alternative even with building out pumped hydro everywhere and ever more hydrodams.  Hell, if I were them, I would be building even MORE of them than they already are.  Only reason their coal usage dropped slightly is because they finally switched out their old garbage generators for modern ones. 

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1 hour ago, notsonice said:

Coal is dead in the US....no new coal plants in the US....just demolitions

 

January 11, 2022

Coal will account for 85% of U.S. electric generating capacity retirements in 2022

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generating capacity retirements
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Operators have scheduled 14.9 gigawatts (GW) of electric generating capacity to retire in the United States during 2022, according to our latest inventory of electric generators. The majority of the scheduled retirements are coal-fired power plants (85%), followed by natural gas (8%) and nuclear (5%).

Coal. After substantial retirements of U.S. coal-fired electric generating capacity from 2015 to 2020 that averaged 11.0 GW a year, coal capacity retirements slowed to 4.6 GW in 2021. However, we expect retirement of coal-fired generators to increase again this year; 12.6 GW of coal capacity is scheduled to retire in 2022, or 6% of the coal-fired generating capacity that was operating at the end of 2021.

Most of the plants making up the operating U.S. coal fleet were built in the 1970s and 1980s. U.S. coal plants are retiring as the coal fleet ages and as coal-fired generators face increasing competition from natural gas and renewables.

The largest coal power plant planning to retire in 2022 is the 1,305-megawatt (MW) William H. Zimmer plant in Ohio. Morgantown Generating Station in Maryland plans to retire its two coal-fired units (1,205 MW combined) in June, followed by two of the plant’s six smaller petroleum-fired units in September.

Natural gas. In 2022, 1.2 GW of U.S. natural gas-fired capacity is scheduled for retirement. The retiring natural gas capacity is made up of older steam and combustion turbine units, which are less efficient and smaller than many of the newer combined-cycle units.

The largest U.S. natural gas plant planning to retire in 2022 is the Meramec power plant in Missouri. Meramec, which has four generating units, was originally a coal-fired plant. Two of the plant’s generators were converted to use natural gas in 2016. These units, as well as the plant’s two coal-fired units, plan to retire in December 2022.

Nuclear. At 0.8 GW, nuclear capacity retirements represent 5% of expected retirements in 2022 and less than 1% of the operating U.S. nuclear fleet. The retiring nuclear capacity comes from one plant, the Palisades nuclear power facility in Michigan. The retirement of Palisades is a result of historically low natural gas prices, limited growth in electricity demand, and increasing competition from renewable energy.

planned U.S. utility-scale electric generator retirements
Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Preliminary Monthly Electric Generator Inventory, October 2021

Power plant owners and operators report planned retirements to EIA in our annual and monthly electric generator surveys.

A previous Today in Energy article describes the 46.1 GW of generating capacity that developers plan to bring online in 2022.

Principal contributors: Elesia Fasching, Suparna Ray

I guess you did not read the IEA fine print,

"The economic rebound from the pandemic is taking coal power generation to a new record high this year, with global coal demand likely hitting another new high next year, undermining net-zero efforts, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said in its annual Coal 2021 report released on Friday.

According to the agency, the 2020 collapse in coal demand turned out to be smaller than anticipated, as China’s recovery began sooner than expected and turned out to be stronger than initially forecast.

Based on current trends, global coal demand is set to rise to 8025 Mt in 2022, the highest level ever seen, and to remain there through 2024, the IEA estimates.

This year’s global recovery dashed any hopes that coal-fired power generation may have peaked, the IEA said, expecting global coal power generation to rise by 9 percent this year to 10350 terawatt-hours (TWh)—a new all-time high.

Over the next two years, global coal demand could even see new record highs as emerging markets led by China and India will lead consumption growth which is set to outpace declines in developed economies, according to the IEA."

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57 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

I would think that the price of the natural gas switchers would be much lower. Any existing switcher could be converted to natural gas. Same with any vehicle or engine of any kind. Quite an advantage. 

Europe has now deemed natural gas and nuclear as green energy sources, so electrical vehicles will not have as large a propaganda advantage. 

again the regenerative braking is what is making the battery locos more efficient . Electricity is cheaper to power than Nat gas  (commercial electricity  rates are half of what you or I pay and night time rates even better) Electricity from renewables is more green than Nat gas

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4 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

 

 

I guess you did not read the IEA fine print,

"The economic rebound from the pandemic is taking coal power generation to a new record high this year, with global coal demand likely hitting another new high next year, undermining net-zero efforts, the International Energy Agency (IEA) said in its annual Coal 2021 report released on Friday.

According to the agency, the 2020 collapse in coal demand turned out to be smaller than anticipated, as China’s recovery began sooner than expected and turned out to be stronger than initially forecast.

Based on current trends, global coal demand is set to rise to 8025 Mt in 2022, the highest level ever seen, and to remain there through 2024, the IEA estimates.

This year’s global recovery dashed any hopes that coal-fired power generation may have peaked, the IEA said, expecting global coal power generation to rise by 9 percent this year to 10350 terawatt-hours (TWh)—a new all-time high.

Over the next two years, global coal demand could even see new record highs as emerging markets led by China and India will lead consumption growth which is set to outpace declines in developed economies, according to the IEA."

global coal demand is set to rise to 8025 Mt in 2022, the highest level ever seen...yet in 2014 world coal production was at 8,164.9 MT...... You tell me which number is bigger 8025 or 8164.9??? please no calculators or help from your teacher ... 2022 is not going to set a record.....IEA obviously does not look at historical records the same as you....

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59 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

LNG is very dense and can easily fuel locomotives. I have not seen any comparison to cost or utility. Overhead electric lines make sense too. Any of the above can do the job. The cost of the engines and the cost of the fuel and the cost of the overhead lines all need to be figured in. I doubt there are any good statistics. I don't smoke anything.😊

Overhead electric lines make sense too. ...for charging no need to run overheads everywhere  just for runs long enough to charge up batteries. Wabtecs locos need up to 45 minutes thus on main lines 50 miles per 300 to 400 miles of track???? or charging stations once again where crews swap out (remember crews no longer sleep in cabooses they can only be on a train for no more than 12 hours straight.....

By law they cannot
remain or go on duty for a period in excess of 12 consecutive hours;
remain or go on duty unless that employee has had at least 10 consecutive hours off duty during the prior 24 hours; or
 
Railroads like to swap out at 8 hours to avoid overtime pay
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1 hour ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

Apparently you do not: India is massively ramping up coal production.  https://www.moneycontrol.com/news/business/coal-indias-production-rises-7-in-january-8020291.html

Future projections: https://www.climatescorecard.org/2019/05/coal-production-is-expanding-in-india/

https://madrascourier.com/environment/indias-plans-to-increase-coal-production-is-an-environmental-social-disaster/

Add Nigeria to that list... Any country that has coal and is developing will use coal and continue to do so. 

China not use coal?  HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA  I have swamp land to sell you... Its going cheap, prime waterfront.  They have no alternative even with building out pumped hydro everywhere and ever more hydrodams.  Hell, if I were them, I would be building even MORE of them than they already are.  Only reason their coal usage dropped slightly is because they finally switched out their old garbage generators for modern ones. 

Report recommends no new coal plants for India as prospects for batteries improve

An expert committee in India is recommending that the country stop building new coal-fired power plants, after concluding that renewables can meet all future need for electricity.

Jharia Coal mine India ‘can’t escape’ coal phasedown, needs funding to drive just transition for 33 million workers. Image: TripodStories- AB, CC BY-SA 4.0

2 minute read Jan. 31, 2022

An expert committee in India is recommending that the country stop building new coal-fired power plants, after concluding that renewables can meet all future need for electricity.

“The committee, headed by former Central Electricity Authority (CEA) chair Gireesh Pradhan, found the addition of low-cost renewable energy capacity would handle the expected growth in electricity demand,” the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) reports. “It also found the overall coal fleet was underutilised, averaging 55 per cent capacity utilisation,” though that capacity factor will improve as demand rises.

The report calls for India to replace retired coal capacity with 450 gigawatts (GW) of “variable renewables” capacity by 2030, writes IEEFA Energy Finance Analyst Kashish Shah, with peak power supplied through a combination of batteries and pumped storage, conventional gas and coal, and hydropower.

Many other jurisdictions have looked to gas-fired power plants, with their flexibility to ramp up and down quickly, to meet peak demand. But Shah says a lack of domestic supply has kept gas plants and India to a utilisation rate below 20 per cent.

And now, gas isn’t the only option to accommodate sudden changes in demand. “In terms of flexibility, battery storage is the most proven technology to provide fast ramp-up and ramp-down energy dispatch and fast frequency service,” he writes. “Batteries ramp up to full load in a minute and can also absorb excess power from the grid.”

With system costs falling fast over the last decade, Shah says solar+storage is cost-competitive with new coal plants and “burgeoning” in the United States and Australia. And recent market and regulatory changes could bring those trends to India, as well.

“ReNew Power, one of the biggest renewable energy developers in India, and Fluence Energy, a leading battery technology provider, have announced a joint venture to develop a 150-MWh storage facility in Karnataka,” he reports. “The cost of batteries could reduce further with local manufacture,” and government support is on the way to help build up localised battery value chains.

This story was published with permission from The Energy Mix.

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30 minutes ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

The recommendation by some renewable energy major investors? 

You're a gullible loser, aren't you...

Their article is sourced - they may have a bias or objective in their reporting, but unless you believe what they are reporting is factually wrong, it doesn't really matter.  I did a quick google search, and Reuters, and the Indian NEP (sort of their version of the IEA) are both saying that a plan to stop construction of new coal fired plants is may be adopted.  It's real news regardless of the source.

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On 1/27/2022 at 12:50 AM, Boat said:

Renewables with batteries can handle all non critical electrical needs including electric cars and air conditioning. They can also handle base load if your far enough south to avoid winter storms like in Texas. A state or area would have to be aware of floods, hurricanes etc. I am no expert at determining how much nat gas reserve margin that sits around and does nothing waiting on a 10 year flood. Nat gas still seems to be the best option. Just don’t have Texas manage it.

The state needs to let the public decide. Like we can supply 2 days worth of electricity with the grid and batteries for this price. If you want 10 days of reserve margin it would be x price. Instead of name calling being practical would be smarter. I don’t think politicians are smart enough to think like that though. 

Winter storms like in Texas are avoidable by having some clue. Sweden manages somehow? So, Texas is too far south already.

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1 hour ago, notsonice said:

Report recommends no new coal plants for India as prospects for batteries improve

An expert committee in India is recommending that the country stop building new coal-fired power plants, after concluding that renewables can meet all future need for electricity.

Jharia Coal mine India ‘can’t escape’ coal phasedown, needs funding to drive just transition for 33 million workers. Image: TripodStories- AB, CC BY-SA 4.0

 

 
2 minute read Jan. 31, 2022

An expert committee in India is recommending that the country stop building new coal-fired power plants, after concluding that renewables can meet all future need for electricity.

“The committee, headed by former Central Electricity Authority (CEA) chair Gireesh Pradhan, found the addition of low-cost renewable energy capacity would handle the expected growth in electricity demand,” the Institute for Energy Economics and Financial Analysis (IEEFA) reports. “It also found the overall coal fleet was underutilised, averaging 55 per cent capacity utilisation,” though that capacity factor will improve as demand rises.

The report calls for India to replace retired coal capacity with 450 gigawatts (GW) of “variable renewables” capacity by 2030, writes IEEFA Energy Finance Analyst Kashish Shah, with peak power supplied through a combination of batteries and pumped storage, conventional gas and coal, and hydropower.

Many other jurisdictions have looked to gas-fired power plants, with their flexibility to ramp up and down quickly, to meet peak demand. But Shah says a lack of domestic supply has kept gas plants and India to a utilisation rate below 20 per cent.

And now, gas isn’t the only option to accommodate sudden changes in demand. “In terms of flexibility, battery storage is the most proven technology to provide fast ramp-up and ramp-down energy dispatch and fast frequency service,” he writes. “Batteries ramp up to full load in a minute and can also absorb excess power from the grid.”

With system costs falling fast over the last decade, Shah says solar+storage is cost-competitive with new coal plants and “burgeoning” in the United States and Australia. And recent market and regulatory changes could bring those trends to India, as well.

“ReNew Power, one of the biggest renewable energy developers in India, and Fluence Energy, a leading battery technology provider, have announced a joint venture to develop a 150-MWh storage facility in Karnataka,” he reports. “The cost of batteries could reduce further with local manufacture,” and government support is on the way to help build up localised battery value chains.

This story was published with permission from The Energy Mix.

No way in heck. India has been building up a portfolio of long-term coal contracts like crazy.

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Just now, Andrei Moutchkine said:

No way in heck. India has been building up a portfolio of long-term coal contracts like crazy.

 

 

deal with it....

since 2015, 326GW of proposed coal projects in India have seen cancellations, which means a 92% decrease in the pipeline. .....which means India’s pre-construction pipeline of 21GW risks getting scrapped.

 

 

India is bidding adieu to thermal plants: What happens to coal demand?

While old coal-fired power plants are being phased out, India has not commissioned a new one for some time now. But India's coal demand will still see growth in the short term. What's this paradox?

Krishna Veera Vanamali  |  New Delhi  Last Updated at January 13, 2022 08:30 IST

 
 
koo-icon.jpg?1
 
Every year, the coal behemoth advises power producers to stock up before the monsoon since the mines tend to get flooded, impacting production.
 
 
 

Banks around the world are increasingly deserting coal projects, from mining to power plants. And the case is no different in India. Coal is after all the most polluting fossil fuel and the biggest contributor to climate change.

India is currently constructing 34GW of new coal capacity on top of its existing fleet of 233GW. Notably, a recent study by independent climate change think tank E3G has found that since 2015, 326GW of proposed coal projects in India have seen cancellations, which means a 92% decrease in the pipeline.

The economics are also not favourable towards building new coal plants, which means India’s pre-construction pipeline of 21GW risks getting scrapped.

India’s renewable power tariffs are among the lowest in the world. It has seen a remarkable increase in the capacity addition of renewable energy generation led by solar and wind power.

Several power plants are set to be decommissioned in the coming years. Coal plants are normally decommissioned after the completion of their useful life, which could range anywhere from 25 to 45 years.

The International Energy Agency estimates India’s coal demand to grow 4% annually till at least 2024.

And a report by NITI Aayog in December said that coal-based electricity generation capacity in India is likely “to peak at about 250 GW” by the end of this decade or immediately thereafter whereas coal-based electricity generation will slow down, and likely peak a few years later.

Amid such forecast, an expert panel set up by NITI Aayog has proposed a scrappage policy for thermal power plants. Approximately 54GW of coal plants could be considered for retirement by 2030.

What this means is that a reduction in thermal power generation capacity will not translate into lower coal consumption.

Existing power plants are in a comfortable position to absorb the growth in coal demand over the medium term, which could also improve their efficiency.

Since funding is hard to come by in the sector, new projects beyond those already under construction are unlikely to come up. This, however, will not mean that the end of coal is near even though it will grow at a much slower pace than renewable power generation.

 

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16 minutes ago, notsonice said:

 

 

deal with it....

since 2015, 326GW of proposed coal projects in India have seen cancellations, which means a 92% decrease in the pipeline. .....which means India’s pre-construction pipeline of 21GW risks getting scrapped.

 

 

India is bidding adieu to thermal plants: What happens to coal demand?

While old coal-fired power plants are being phased out, India has not commissioned a new one for some time now. But India's coal demand will still see growth in the short term. What's this paradox?

Krishna Veera Vanamali  |  New Delhi  Last Updated at January 13, 2022 08:30 IST

 
 
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Every year, the coal behemoth advises power producers to stock up before the monsoon since the mines tend to get flooded, impacting production.
 
 
 

Banks around the world are increasingly deserting coal projects, from mining to power plants. And the case is no different in India. Coal is after all the most polluting fossil fuel and the biggest contributor to climate change.

India is currently constructing 34GW of new coal capacity on top of its existing fleet of 233GW. Notably, a recent study by independent climate change think tank E3G has found that since 2015, 326GW of proposed coal projects in India have seen cancellations, which means a 92% decrease in the pipeline.

The economics are also not favourable towards building new coal plants, which means India’s pre-construction pipeline of 21GW risks getting scrapped.

India’s renewable power tariffs are among the lowest in the world. It has seen a remarkable increase in the capacity addition of renewable energy generation led by solar and wind power.

Several power plants are set to be decommissioned in the coming years. Coal plants are normally decommissioned after the completion of their useful life, which could range anywhere from 25 to 45 years.

The International Energy Agency estimates India’s coal demand to grow 4% annually till at least 2024.

And a report by NITI Aayog in December said that coal-based electricity generation capacity in India is likely “to peak at about 250 GW” by the end of this decade or immediately thereafter whereas coal-based electricity generation will slow down, and likely peak a few years later.

Amid such forecast, an expert panel set up by NITI Aayog has proposed a scrappage policy for thermal power plants. Approximately 54GW of coal plants could be considered for retirement by 2030.

What this means is that a reduction in thermal power generation capacity will not translate into lower coal consumption.

Existing power plants are in a comfortable position to absorb the growth in coal demand over the medium term, which could also improve their efficiency.

Since funding is hard to come by in the sector, new projects beyond those already under construction are unlikely to come up. This, however, will not mean that the end of coal is near even though it will grow at a much slower pace than renewable power generation.

 

So far, a non-event, given overall demand growth in coal that they also mention. A whole lot of large Indian projects gets cancelled due to lack of funding, not only energy. This is how things are always done over there. Are nukes "thermal?" India is also building up on nukes.

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