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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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I am for all of the above. Coal, and nuclear are near the bottom of my list. What Russia is doing in Ukraine has turned me against nuclear once again. We don't need that to happen here. Yes, it could happen. 

Sure, renewables are fine if they are cost competitive with natural gas and oil. You need to look long term. Both need development. Renewables need far more though and are way behind in what they produce. 

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Just now, Old-Ruffneck said:

Who really cares about owning a Tesla? I still prefer "good 'ol internal combustion."

Filling a gas-powered vehicle can still be cheaper than charging an electric one | Fox Business

Way more people than they can make cars for. Tesla Superchargers are much less expensive than the EA network cited in your article and Tesla cars are much more efficient than the Mach E also cited in your article.

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7 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Way more people than they can make cars for. Tesla Superchargers are much less expensive than the EA network cited in your article and Tesla cars are much more efficient than the Mach E also cited in your article.

I would believe the article over yer biased opinions. 

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(edited)

2 hours ago, KeyboardWarrior said:

I suppose. Wind farms are doing pretty good here in South Dakota because of high capacity factor, but also because state legislature is more lenient than elsewhere. 

Wind is IMHO on the 'other' side of the technology and power generation supply curve.  It can make a handsome profit without subsidies in the right places, and private equity is lining up to build capacity.  Solar is still more situational.  Just like 'traditional' energy projects, the same questions always apply:  How hard is it to get permits - how expensive is environmental review, what 'special taxation district' rules do we have to get through the legislature, etc.  

Edited by Eric Gagen
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13 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Way more people than they can make cars for. Tesla Superchargers are much less expensive than the EA network cited in your article and Tesla cars are much more efficient than the Mach E also cited in your article.

When do you think that inexpensive electric vehicles will be available in the Western World? Why don't we have them available now? I have been a fan of one marketed from Texas called the Kandi I think. 

Edited by Ron Wagner

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38 minutes ago, Eric Gagen said:

Wind is IMHO on the 'other' side of the technology and power generation supply curve.  It can make a handsome profit without subsidies in the right places, and private equity is lining up to build capacity.  Solar is still more situational.  Just like 'traditional' energy projects, the same questions always apply:  How hard is it to get permits - how expensive is environmental review, what 'special taxation district' rules do we have to get through the legislature, etc.  

Also what will the federal government and the existing politicians do for or against a specific technology. I think they are getting a big wake up call right now which will go on for a few years at least. The global warmists will not be able to mandate their choices. All of the above will be the way to go for awhile. 

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41 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

When do you think that inexpensive electric vehicles will be available in the Western World? Why don't we have them available now? I have been a fan of one marketed from Texas called the Kandi I think. 

Because demand is greater than supply which drives up the cost. Why make 2 low margin EV when you can make one high margin EV? Teslas are expensive and there is no end in sight of increasing demand. 

Americans like big powerful vehicles, little econo boxes don't sell well here. The first low cost EVs in the West are in Europe:

The Dacia Spring Electric is probably the most environmentally-friendly and pocket-friendly electric car on the market in Europe right now.

Meet Europe's Cheapest Electric Car - DACIA SPRING (source: Fully Charged)

It's an absolute entry-level, small, city car for up to four passengers, which appears to be a perfect solution for the basic transport needs, especially in big city centers, where space is constrained.

According to Fully Charged's review, Dacia (part of the Renault Group), offers the Spring Electric in France at €17,890 ($20,200), but with incentives, it can be as low as €12,500 or so ($14,100). https://insideevs.com/features/549565/europe-cheapest-ev-dacia-spring/

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31 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Because demand is greater than supply which drives up the cost. Why make 2 low margin EV when you can make one high margin EV? Teslas are expensive and there is no end in sight of increasing demand. 

Americans like big powerful vehicles, little econo boxes don't sell well here. The first low cost EVs in the West are in Europe:

The Dacia Spring Electric is probably the most environmentally-friendly and pocket-friendly electric car on the market in Europe right now.

Meet Europe's Cheapest Electric Car - DACIA SPRING (source: Fully Charged)

It's an absolute entry-level, small, city car for up to four passengers, which appears to be a perfect solution for the basic transport needs, especially in big city centers, where space is constrained.

According to Fully Charged's review, Dacia (part of the Renault Group), offers the Spring Electric in France at €17,890 ($20,200), but with incentives, it can be as low as €12,500 or so ($14,100). https://insideevs.com/features/549565/europe-cheapest-ev-dacia-spring/

Less than 1% of the vehicles market...no real change here, or going forward.

Who wants to drive this golf buggy?

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1 hour ago, Old-Ruffneck said:

I would believe the article over yer biased opinions. 

The other funny thing about your article is that they didn't use a pure ICE for their comparison they used an HEV. But of course if they would have used a pure ICE they would have had to say that BEV is always less expensive.

At this early stage of the transition if you don't have your own garage or carport then a HEV is a better choice than BEV. But charging overnight at home is dirt cheap compared to buying gasoline.

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(edited)

Biden is now reversing gears and backpedaling his Green revolution....he is now begging for more shale oil production. 

Talk about schizophrenia in high places....this deserves some kind of award for hysteria.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Shale-CEOs-Meet-With-US-Officials-Amid-Surging-Oil-Prices.html

“I’ve been told his mindset is changing,” Scott Sheffield, CEO of Pioneer Natural Resources, the biggest oil producer in the Permian, told Bloomberg, referring to President Biden’s stance on the oil industry.

Commenting on the import ban for Russian energy, American Petroleum Institute (API) President and CEO Mike Sommers said on Tuesday:

“We share the goal of reducing reliance on foreign energy sources and urge policymakers to advance American energy leadership and expand domestic production to counter Russia’s influence in global energy markets.”

The U.S. oil industry seeks a longer-term commitment to the sector from the Administration and says that despite all pleas and calls, it simply cannot raise production too fast too soon. Capex discipline from the largest shale firms and the supply chain bottlenecks for many producers will cap U.S. oil production growth, industry executives say.

Even if ConocoPhillips decided to pump more oil today, the first drop of new oil would come within eight to 12 months, CEO Ryan Lance told CNBC on Tuesday.

Occidental Petroleum CEO Vicki Hollub said at the CERAWeek conference: “We’ve never faced a scenario where we need to grow production, when actually supply chains not only in our industry but every industry in the world [are] being impacted by the pandemic.”

Despite its flexibility to respond to soaring oil prices, the U.S. shale patch cannot come to the rescue of the increasingly tightening global oil market with some Russian crude not making its way to buyers, commodity intelligence firm Kpler said earlier this week."

Edited by Ecocharger

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20 hours ago, notsonice said:

Second eight-hour lithium-ion battery system

C Power said yesterday that members of the Joint Power Agency’s board voted at a special meeting to enter into a contract for Goal Line, a 50MW/400MWh lithium-ion

8 hours.... Almost rational in perfect weather, though last I checked, average sun hours in winter with tracking was less than 8 hours... So, shall we go back to 1st grade?  24-8 is what again?  In a perfect world where there are no clouds for a couple days straight or is thinking about clouds too difficult for genius's in California?  Apparently they never passed the 1st grade either. 

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2 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Less than 1% of the vehicles market...no real change here, or going forward.

Who wants to drive this golf buggy?

the 2022 new vehicle sales of ev's  in the US is  currently  estimated to be  1.2 million vehicles 

Do you want me to do the math for you on what percentage of the new vehicle market this is?????

Edited by notsonice
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51 minutes ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

8 hours.... Almost rational in perfect weather, though last I checked, average sun hours in winter with tracking was less than 8 hours... So, shall we go back to 1st grade?  24-8 is what again?  In a perfect world where there are no clouds for a couple days straight or is thinking about clouds too difficult for genius's in California?  Apparently they never passed the 1st grade either. 

You obviously have  never been to California. Yes you should go back to the first grade

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Just now, notsonice said:

You obviously have  never been to California. Yes you should go back to the first grade

Oh, are you going to demonstrate 1st grade math? 

We are waiting with baited breath. 

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4 minutes ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

Oh, are you going to demonstrate 1st grade math? 

We are waiting with baited breath. 

I have no idea what you are babbling about. You seem to be upset again, did you  not get a nap today?????

 

you do not understand when peak demand occurs???? let me explain it to you, Junior

When the sun is shining......and it is hot out (cause the sun is shining).....solar panels work the best....especially at mid day.....these are the days that people use air-conditioners. So you need more power....as in June July and August..........when the sun shines the most and it is really hot out....so you use batteries to store the excess power generated (yep when the sun is shining at the most during the middle of they day) and when people crank up their power usage from 3 to 7 pm you have the batteries put power back into the grid........IE peak power use is always from 3 to 7 pm 

and on cloudy days....it does not get very hot out as the sunshine does not hit you in the face....you do not need air conditioning so much ....as it is never very hot ......and the peak power usage is much less than when the sun is shining

Got it bird brain???????

 

Edited by notsonice
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(edited)

29 minutes ago, notsonice said:

the 2022 new vehicle sales of ev's  is  currently  estimated to be  1.2 million vehicles 

Do you want me to do the math for you on what percentage of the new vehicle market this is?????

I think you mean 12 million.

Last year was 6.6 million.

Sales of electric cars hit 6.6 million in 2021, more than tripling their market share from two years earlier

image.thumb.png.76e14a76a3b2623e433e6f620103e8f9.png

https://www.iea.org/commentaries/electric-cars-fend-off-supply-challenges-to-more-than-double-global-sales

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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1 minute ago, Jay McKinsey said:

I think you mean 12 million.

Last year was 6.6 million.

Sales of electric cars hit 6.6 million in 2021, more than tripling their market share from two years earlier

https://www.iea.org/commentaries/electric-cars-fend-off-supply-challenges-to-more-than-double-global-sales

1.2 million in the US....I fixed my comments while you were writing 

Edited by notsonice

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2 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Less than 1% of the vehicles market...no real change here, or going forward.

Who wants to drive this golf buggy?

Well 400K people bought this EV last year:

%E4%BA%94%E8%8F%B1%E5%AE%8F%E5%85%89mini_EV_9733_1.jpg

 

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3 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Because demand is greater than supply which drives up the cost. Why make 2 low margin EV when you can make one high margin EV? Teslas are expensive and there is no end in sight of increasing demand. 

Americans like big powerful vehicles, little econo boxes don't sell well here. The first low cost EVs in the West are in Europe:

The Dacia Spring Electric is probably the most environmentally-friendly and pocket-friendly electric car on the market in Europe right now.

Meet Europe's Cheapest Electric Car - DACIA SPRING (source: Fully Charged)

It's an absolute entry-level, small, city car for up to four passengers, which appears to be a perfect solution for the basic transport needs, especially in big city centers, where space is constrained.

According to Fully Charged's review, Dacia (part of the Renault Group), offers the Spring Electric in France at €17,890 ($20,200), but with incentives, it can be as low as €12,500 or so ($14,100). https://insideevs.com/features/549565/europe-cheapest-ev-dacia-spring/

A very nice looking vehicle. I would have to check out the rear seating to see if there is enough room for three little people or children. It is underpowered and doesn't have enough range. My Mitsubishi Mirage beats it by far for $14,000 and no rebates. Gasoline is very high though and if it meets the needs locally it is a good deal. Europeans don't drive nearly as far as we do. They are used to much smaller cars historically and their prices are higher than ours for fuel. 

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4 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Well 400K people bought this EV last year:

%E4%BA%94%E8%8F%B1%E5%AE%8F%E5%85%89mini_EV_9733_1.jpg

 

So give us the link please. 

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1 minute ago, Ron Wagner said:

A very nice looking vehicle. I would have to check out the rear seating to see if there is enough room for three little people or children. It is underpowered and doesn't have enough range. My Mitsubishi Mirage beats it by far for $14,000 and no rebates. Gasoline is very high though and if it meets the needs locally it is a good deal. Europeans don't drive nearly as far as we do. They are used to much smaller cars historically and their prices are higher than ours for fuel. 

Ron kudos on buying a fuel efficient vehicle.... I work on making as few as trips as possible as I believe it is a sin to waste resources...Including gas, coal, oil or anything that we mine or take from the earth......

Truly a car that gets 40 mpg is a winner 

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How hard is it to get import licensing and safety approval to the USA. Just sheer curiosity. A lot of people could use such cars. They like the uniqueness and the attention plus savings. 

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4 minutes ago, notsonice said:

Ron kudos on buying a fuel efficient vehicle.... I work on making as few as trips as possible as I believe it is a sin to waste resources...Including gas, coal, oil or anything that we mine or take from the earth......

Truly a car that gets 40 mpg is a winner 

We still have a 12 passenger van that we should sell to someone that would really use it. 15 mpg. but very safe. Large Leather seats and a nice V8. Also a minivan.

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