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On 7/8/2022 at 4:56 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

wind farms aren’t quite the bird slayers they’re often portrayed to be – one study found that they cause 0.4 deaths per gigawatt hour (GWh) of electricity generated, compared with 5.2 dead birds for every GWh generated by fossil-fuelled power stations 

But a recent study from the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research might offer a solution. Researchers compared bird mortality rates over five years at a Norwegian wind farm and then randomly selected four out of the 68 turbines for a new paint job. They found that painting a single wind turbine blade black could reduce bird fatalities by 72%, and it was most effective at reducing collision deaths for birds of prey, such as white-tailed eagles https://theconversation.com/painting-wind-turbines-black-could-help-protect-birds-as-long-as-it-doesnt-disrupt-their-migration-145407#:~:text=They found that painting a,tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla).

We can paint em black, blue, yellow, red, put lights on them, reduce their size, increase their size, but they are a blight on their presence on our oceans, and just last month, on a train through Wales, the wind turbines look like they are leaning in different directions.  Not a pretty sight.

The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2

 

Report

Title: The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2
Publication Date: 
July 1, 2019
Document Number: 
C063/19
Pages: 
117
Publisher: 
Wageningen Marine Research
Sponsoring Organization: 
Receptor: 

Document Access

Website: 

Citation

van Kooten, T.; Soudijn, F.; Tulp, I.; Chen, C.; Benden, D.; Leopold, M. (2019). The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2(Report No. C063/19). Report by Wageningen University and Research Centre. Report for Rijkswaterstaat.

Abstract

The planned large-scale development of offshore wind farms (OWFs) in the North Sea has potential consequences for many marine organisms, including seabirds. The response of seabirds to wind farms varies depending on species: some may be attracted to the wind farms leading to risk of collisions, some will avoid them and some do not respond. Those birds that avoid wind farms do not suffer from collisions but may suffer from habitat loss if OWFs are built in areas they use, which may in turn negatively affect the populations of seabirds using the Dutch continental shelf. Adverse effects of offshore wind farms on seabirds potentially lead to a trade-off between societal demands for marine nature conservation and clean energy. Seabirds are important target species in European conservation frameworks. In this report, we develop and apply a method for assessing the effect of habitat loss on five seabird species: red-throated divers (Gavia stellata), northern gannets (Morus bassanus), sandwich terns (Thalasseus sandvicensis), razorbills (Alca torda) and common guillemots (Uria aalge). To our knowledge, this is the first study that calculates effects on the full life cycle and the larger North Sea population. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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1 hour ago, JoMack said:

We can paint em black, blue, yellow, red, put lights on them, reduce their size, increase their size, but they are a blight on their presence on our oceans, and just last month, on a train through Wales, the wind turbines look like they are leaning in different directions.  Not a pretty sight.

The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2

 

Report

Title: The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2
Publication Date: 
July 1, 2019
Document Number: 
C063/19
Pages: 
117
Publisher: 
Wageningen Marine Research
Sponsoring Organization: 
Receptor: 

Document Access

Website: 

Citation

van Kooten, T.; Soudijn, F.; Tulp, I.; Chen, C.; Benden, D.; Leopold, M. (2019). The consequences of seabird habitat loss from offshore wind turbines, version 2(Report No. C063/19). Report by Wageningen University and Research Centre. Report for Rijkswaterstaat.

Abstract

The planned large-scale development of offshore wind farms (OWFs) in the North Sea has potential consequences for many marine organisms, including seabirds. The response of seabirds to wind farms varies depending on species: some may be attracted to the wind farms leading to risk of collisions, some will avoid them and some do not respond. Those birds that avoid wind farms do not suffer from collisions but may suffer from habitat loss if OWFs are built in areas they use, which may in turn negatively affect the populations of seabirds using the Dutch continental shelf. Adverse effects of offshore wind farms on seabirds potentially lead to a trade-off between societal demands for marine nature conservation and clean energy. Seabirds are important target species in European conservation frameworks. In this report, we develop and apply a method for assessing the effect of habitat loss on five seabird species: red-throated divers (Gavia stellata), northern gannets (Morus bassanus), sandwich terns (Thalasseus sandvicensis), razorbills (Alca torda) and common guillemots (Uria aalge). To our knowledge, this is the first study that calculates effects on the full life cycle and the larger North Sea population. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Offshore renewable energy improves habitat, increases fish

Jun 26, 2020

Offshore turbines and other renewable energy structures can have beneficial impacts on seafloor habitats and fish communities, said researchers from Belgium and the U.K. at a recent webinar on lessons learned from offshore renewable energy. 

The European scientists, whose countries have a long history with offshore renewable energy, shared their findings with U.S. colleagues who are eyeing proposals for thousands of offshore wind turbines to be installed in the U.S. Atlantic.

Andy Lipsky, who serves as the fisheries and offshore wind science lead for NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center, said, “It’s vital that we understand how these offshore wind developments interact with [other] existing uses and with our ecosystem.” He added that the U.S. has important wildlife and fisheries in the areas where the offshore wind farms are planned “and so sharing lessons learned from our European colleagues is vitally important.”

Jan Vanaverbeke, a senior scientist at the Royal Belgian Institute for Natural Sciences, Operational Directorate Natural Environment, Marine Ecology and Management Group, and a visiting professor at Ghent University, Belgium, said that scientists know that there is high biodiversity around the turbines, but researchers sought to determine whether the turbines are simply aggregators of fish, meaning they attract them from elsewhere, or whether they contribute to secondary production, meaning that because of the turbines there are actually higher numbers of fish in the water.

For the two commercial species that they studied at a Belgian offshore wind farm, researchers found evidence that the wind turbines not only attracted fish, providing both shelter and food (from the organisms that grew on the turbines), but also served a role in their life cycle, with young fish attracted to the wind farm where they would grow, then leave to spawn, and then other juveniles would come to the wind farm to grow. In a separate study, they also found that the presence of filter feeders on the turbines, such as mussels, increased the nutrients in the seafloor around the turbines. 

Emma Sheehan, a senior research fellow at the School of Biological and Marine Sciences and Faculty of Science and Engineering at the University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, looked at the impacts of wind farms and wave energy structures on seafloor habitats and species. She also talked about the interactions of offshore mussel aquaculture and fisheries. Her group’s research has shown that “in areas that were heavily degraded seabed, we’ve seen that the mussel shell fallout onto the seabed habitat seems to be increasing biodiversity. It’s restoring benthic habitats. It’s also increasing the benthic commercially valuable species such as lobster and crab on the seabed,” she said, as well as increasing commercially valuable bait species that fishermen will gather for use as they head off to their traditional fishing grounds.

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(edited)

On 7/9/2022 at 12:54 AM, Boat said:

Putin (the Mafia) lost control. Kiss nat gas good bye. Hello electric economy. 
 

Do please recall the failure correctly, be it Putin or mother nature both have been proven to be unpredictable since their beginning. Only mindless children wouldplace the trust in such area's..

The corruption in Europe has nothing to do with trust or the common good of its people. It has everything to do with FF politics by a powerful segment of society. You do get the harm to producers as the rest of us go electric. Putin does, the Saudi do, Trump does. The axis of evil. Lol Sleepy, (Biden)  kicking the pollution boys dirty little butts. 

Putin's mafia is perfectly in control. The inflation is suddenly near zero, fuel prices are down, and GDP projections reversed from a double-digit fall to a small growth. All of which is very much the opposite to the West. Good riddance of the fake coupons you call money?

Edited by Andrei Moutchkine
  • Upvote 1

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On 7/8/2022 at 11:56 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

wind farms aren’t quite the bird slayers they’re often portrayed to be – one study found that they cause 0.4 deaths per gigawatt hour (GWh) of electricity generated, compared with 5.2 dead birds for every GWh generated by fossil-fuelled power stations 

But a recent study from the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research might offer a solution. Researchers compared bird mortality rates over five years at a Norwegian wind farm and then randomly selected four out of the 68 turbines for a new paint job. They found that painting a single wind turbine blade black could reduce bird fatalities by 72%, and it was most effective at reducing collision deaths for birds of prey, such as white-tailed eagles https://theconversation.com/painting-wind-turbines-black-could-help-protect-birds-as-long-as-it-doesnt-disrupt-their-migration-145407#:~:text=They found that painting a,tailed eagles (Haliaeetus albicilla).

I heard they are earthworm slayers

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(edited)

14 minutes ago, Andrei Moutchkine said:

Putin's mafia is perfectly in control. The inflation is suddenly near zero, fuel prices are down, and GDP projections reversed from a double-digit fall to a small growth. All of which is very much the opposite to the West. Good riddance of the fake coupons you call money?

June 17, 2022 

Under its so-called “inertia” scenario, Sberbank forecasts Russia’s GDP to fall by 7% in 2022 and 10.3% in 2023 compared with 2021, when it grew by 4.7% to $1.77 trillion.

https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2022/06/17/russian-economy-faces-10-years-of-recession-without-reforms-sberbank-ceo-a78031

Edited by Jay McKinsey
  • Like 1

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24 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

June 17, 2022 

Under its so-called “inertia” scenario, Sberbank forecasts Russia’s GDP to fall by 7% in 2022 and 10.3% in 2023 compared with 2021, when it grew by 4.7% to $1.77 trillion.

https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2022/06/17/russian-economy-faces-10-years-of-recession-without-reforms-sberbank-ceo-a78031

I think this has already been overhauled a few times

https://interfax.com/newsroom/top-stories/80403/

I guess, we'll have to wait and see

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2 hours ago, Andrei Moutchkine said:

I think this has already been overhauled a few times

https://interfax.com/newsroom/top-stories/80403/

I guess, we'll have to wait and see

A couple posts ago you said GDP was going to grow . Your article says 

"Based on calculations and the processes that are now unfolding in the economy, I think that the drop will be less, somewhere in the range of 3% to 5%," 

A drop of 4% is a long way from growth,

 

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21 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

A couple posts ago you said GDP was going to grow . Your article says 

"Based on calculations and the processes that are now unfolding in the economy, I think that the drop will be less, somewhere in the range of 3% to 5%," 

A drop of 4% is a long way from growth,

 

The talking heads really don't know. The situation is very volatile.

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7 minutes ago, Andrei Moutchkine said:

The talking heads really don't know. The situation is very volatile.

Good to hear you don't believe the Russian government. Your talking head is the First Deputy Prime Minister Andrei Belousov ,

  • Haha 1

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33 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Good to hear you don't believe the Russian government. Your talking head is the First Deputy Prime Minister Andrei Belousov ,

I didn't find the one where they say there will be growth, OK, but their estimates are all over the place. This one is just 3 days apart from your Sberbank one.

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(edited)

 

And the deputy prime minister highly qualified his forecast:

"There are several conditions in which the drop will be in the range [of 3-5%]. The most important one is growth of domestic demand," Belousov said.

"If there is no domestic demand, this will mean that we will get about the drop that the Economic Development Ministry is now forecasting. If we manage, through the joint efforts of the Bank of Russia and the government, to awaken domestic demand, activate it, then we can get a drop this year, I think, in the proportions that we're talking about right now, around 3-5%," Belousov said.

"As for next year, I think it's about zero value, that is, a dynamic of about zero. But statistically there might be a slight minus, since we had a very successful first quarter this year - there was double-digit, 12.8% growth [year-on-year] for investment and fairly high [growth of] 3.5% for GDP - so there will be the effect of a high base," Belousov said.

The Central Bank's current forecast projects that Russia's GDP will shrink by 8-10% in 2022, while the Economic Development Ministry forecast a contraction of 7.8%

 

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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(edited)

Commodities will survive the Biden recession.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Crude-Oil/Recession-Fears-Cant-Curb-The-Commodity-Boom.html

"Fears of a looming recession weighed on oil prices this week.

Analysts are predicting that commodities could plunge if key economies enter a recession.

Supply constraints and strong demand for oil and copper have spurred a small rebound in prices."

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

5 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Offshore renewable energy improves habitat, increases fish

Jun 26, 2020

Offshore turbines and other renewable energy structures can have beneficial impacts on seafloor habitats and fish communities, said researchers from Belgium and the U.K. at a recent webinar on lessons learned from offshore renewable energy. 

The European scientists, whose countries have a long history with offshore renewable energy, shared their findings with U.S. colleagues who are eyeing proposals for thousands of offshore wind turbines to be installed in the U.S. Atlantic.

Andy Lipsky, who serves as the fisheries and offshore wind science lead for NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center, said, “It’s vital that we understand how these offshore wind developments interact with [other] existing uses and with our ecosystem.” He added that the U.S. has important wildlife and fisheries in the areas where the offshore wind farms are planned “and so sharing lessons learned from our European colleagues is vitally important.”

Jan Vanaverbeke, a senior scientist at the Royal Belgian Institute for Natural Sciences, Operational Directorate Natural Environment, Marine Ecology and Management Group, and a visiting professor at Ghent University, Belgium, said that scientists know that there is high biodiversity around the turbines, but researchers sought to determine whether the turbines are simply aggregators of fish, meaning they attract them from elsewhere, or whether they contribute to secondary production, meaning that because of the turbines there are actually higher numbers of fish in the water.

For the two commercial species that they studied at a Belgian offshore wind farm, researchers found evidence that the wind turbines not only attracted fish, providing both shelter and food (from the organisms that grew on the turbines), but also served a role in their life cycle, with young fish attracted to the wind farm where they would grow, then leave to spawn, and then other juveniles would come to the wind farm to grow. In a separate study, they also found that the presence of filter feeders on the turbines, such as mussels, increased the nutrients in the seafloor around the turbines. 

Emma Sheehan, a senior research fellow at the School of Biological and Marine Sciences and Faculty of Science and Engineering at the University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, looked at the impacts of wind farms and wave energy structures on seafloor habitats and species. She also talked about the interactions of offshore mussel aquaculture and fisheries. Her group’s research has shown that “in areas that were heavily degraded seabed, we’ve seen that the mussel shell fallout onto the seabed habitat seems to be increasing biodiversity. It’s restoring benthic habitats. It’s also increasing the benthic commercially valuable species such as lobster and crab on the seabed,” she said, as well as increasing commercially valuable bait species that fishermen will gather for use as they head off to their traditional fishing grounds.

Extremely biased opinions, as usual.

I will be visiting San Francisco and Los Angeles this next week or two, to discover the cause of the rapid growth in sidewalk dwelling populations.

Why did California fail?

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

Glencore Places Order For Battery-Powered Mining Vehicles

Glencore is using electric mining machines from Epiroc to provide emissions free raw materials for electric vehicles.

Glencore is one of the largest mining and raw materials companies in the world. Its Sudbury Integrated Nickel Operations division has recently placed an order with Sweden’s Epiroc for a full fleet of battery-electric mining equipment for use at the Onaping Depth Project in Ontario, Canada. The nickel and copper mine is located below the existing Craig mine and is being developed to start production in 2024. The order also includes the capability for advanced automation solutions, including remote control. The new mine in Ontario is in response to the loss of nickel from Ukraine as the result of Russia bloody and brutal assault on that country.

https://cleantechnica.com/2022/07/10/glencore-places-order-for-battery-powered-mining-vehicles/

 

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

Commodities will survive the Biden recession.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Crude-Oil/Recession-Fears-Cant-Curb-The-Commodity-Boom.html

"Fears of a looming recession weighed on oil prices this week.

Analysts are predicting that commodities could plunge if key economies enter a recession.

Supply constraints and strong demand for oil and copper have spurred a small rebound in prices."

Biden recession? Should have known you were a Putin lover.

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(edited)

4 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Biden recession? Should have known you were a Putin lover.

Biden's monetary stimulus at full employment is the root cause, not Putin.

Anyone with an economics background knows that, which excludes Jay.

Starting this week I will fly to California and do a thorough investigation of the burgeoning sidewalk population in those great cities.

Edited by Ecocharger

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8 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Biden's monetary stimulus at full employment is the root cause, not Putin.

Anyone with an economics background knows that, which excludes Jay.

Starting this week I will fly to California and do a thorough investigation of the burgeoning sidewalk population in those great cities.

No, real economists know that the cause is from pandemic caused parts shortages and supply chain failures pushed to crisis point by Putin's invasion,

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Contract price is nearly 6% lower than previous auction in 2019, which could ease pressure on energy bills

 

Ørsted turbines at the Hornsea One field, off the coast of east YorkshireØrsted turbines at the Hornsea One field. The Danish company has won the contract for the world’s biggest offshore wind project at Hornsea Three. Photograph: Ørsted/EPA

 
Alex Lawson Energy correspondent
Fri 8 Jul 2022 05.54 EDT
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The price of offshore wind power in the UK has fallen to an all-time low, which could ease the pressure on future household energy bills.

Following the biggest ever UK renewables auction, the government said on Thursday the contract price for windfarms was nearly 6% lower than the previous auction, despite the rising cost of materials to build windfarms.

 

A string of new contracts should add about 7 gigawatts of clean power capacity to Britain’s turbine fleet by 2026. The government hopes to have 50GW by 2030 and has embarked on a push to expand Britain’s renewables industry in the face of rocketing fossil fuel prices.

Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has exacerbated an already volatile oil and gas market and left countries scrambling to shore up their energy supplies. UK ministers have been forced to ask coal-fired power plants to continue their operations through the winter for fear of blackouts caused by energy shortages  However, renewable energy including wind power is seen as central to Britain’s goal of hitting net zero carbon by 2050.Offshore windfarm operators will sell power for as little as £37.35 per megawatt hour, 5.8% below the lowest bid in the most recent auction in 2019.The “contracts for difference” guarantee wind-power companies fixed prices to sell electricity for the following 15 years. If the market price falls below the contract price, the government subsidises the difference. If the market is higher, the companies pay money back to the government. Since wholesale energy prices began to rocket last year, windfarms have begun paying back money to the government. The easing of an effective moratorium on new onshore windfarms – which was imposed in 2015 – meant onshore wind and solar energy were both included in an auction for the first time in seven years. Onshore wind is now about 45% of the price secured in the auction in 2015.

Among the winners from the auction were the Danish power company Ørsted, Scottish Power and Sweden’s Vattenfall.

Ørsted landed the contract for the world’s biggest offshore wind project, at Hornsea Three, 100 miles (160km) off the east Yorkshire coast. It is hoped the project will produce enough renewable electricity to power 3.2m UK homes.

Scottish Power secured a contract for the East Anglia Three offshore wind project, five onshore wind projects and 10 solar sites. Vattenfall agreed terms for the Norfolk Boreas offshore windfarm, which it said would meet the needs of about 1.5m homes.

It is hoped the projects will help to eventually bring down bills for consumers, which are expected to top £2,800 from October.

The business secretary, Kwasi Kwarteng, said: “Eye-watering gas prices are hitting consumers across Europe. The more cheap, clean power we generate within our own borders, the better protected we will be from volatile gas prices that are pushing up bills.”

Separately on Thursday, the National Grid laid out the biggest investment plan in the UK’s electricity network since the 1960s. In the £54bn upgrade connections to the grid for offshore windfarms will be coordinated for the first time.

National Grid’s electricity arm proposed 15 connection points to bring 18 offshore windfarms to land. Most offshore wind projects have their own connection to the grid. National Grid hopes to reduce costs and cut down disruption for coastal residents by reducing the number of cables and pylons needed.

The Scottish Power chief executive, Keith Anderson, urged the government to speed up the task of approving renewables projects and connecting them to the grid. “There is massive public support for the goal to hit net zero. There is a need for speed. The planning system itself is OK but it’s about getting the process more quickly,” he said.

Gareth Miller, the chief executive of consultancy Cornwall Insight, said: “As consumer bills rise to unprecedented levels, these results show the value that renewables can play in driving down the cost of power generation, decoupling electricity bills from gas prices, and all in an environment currently where high gas prices are setting the electricity price in the market.

This week, the Queen’s property manager, the crown estate, identified five areas off the coasts of Cornwall and Pembrokeshire that could host floating windfarms.

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The death of coal one turbine at a time , the death of coal one solar panel at a time.......
 
 

U.S. Produces More Power from Wind and Solar than Nuclear for First Time

Jessica Thomson - Friday July 9 2022

In April of this year sustainable wind and solar energy sources produced 17.96 percent more electricity than nuclear power plants, the first time the former have overtaken the latter in U.S. history.

Stock image of a wind and solar farm. This April, wind and solar power produced more electricity than nuclear for the first time in the U.S.
© iStock / Getty Images PlusStock image of a wind and solar farm. This April, wind and solar power produced more electricity than nuclear for the first time in the U.S.

This surge in wind and solar-generated electricity meant that clean energy, which also includes geothermal, hydroelectric and biomass energy, comprised nearly 30 percent of the total electricity in the whole U.S., according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) data. In 2021, clean energy only made up around 20 percent of the total electricity across the country.

"Notwithstanding headwinds such as the COVID pandemic, grid access problems, and disruptions in global supply chains, solar and wind remain on a roll", said Ken Bossong, executive director of SUN DAY Campaign, which analyzed the EIA data, in a press release.

"Moreover, by surpassing nuclear power by ever greater margins, they illustrate the foolishness of trying to revive the soon-to-retire Diablo Canyon nuclear plant in California and the just-retired Palisades reactor in Michigan rather than focusing on accelerating renewables' growth."

Burning coal and other fossil fuels like oil and gas has been established as the leading factor in climate change, with coal alone being responsible for 0.3 C of the 1°C global temperature increase so far. Fossil fuels contain hydrocarbons, which when burned, release energy that we convert into electricity to power our homes and businesses. However, fossil fuels release carbon dioxide as a byproduct of this burning process, which traps heat inside the atmosphere. The consequences of the resultant climate change from these rising temperatures are dire, ranging from sea level rises, increased droughts and severe weather, biodiversity loss and crop failures.

 
 

While nuclear energy is one way to generate electricity without producing carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gasses, the nuclear waste produced by the power plants is incredibly dangerous. They also hold the potential to malfunction in catastrophic ways: the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant disaster in the Soviet Union caused local cancer rates to skyrocket, notwithstanding the many deaths from radiation sickness in the employees and firefighters.

Renewable energy sources appear to be the best case solution to the encroaching results of climate change. Not only do they produce less greenhouse gas emissions than fossil fuels, but they are also sustainable, as we cannot use up all of the wind like we can with underground coal and oil. Wind, solar and hydroelectric power are the three biggest renewable energy providers globally, and thanks to decreasing costs in their use over the past decade (85 percent decrease in solar energy costs, and 55 percent in wind), they are increasing in popularity worldwide.

While coal still makes up the majority of the electricity generation in the U.S., the amount to which the country relies on it is decreasing, having dropped by around 4 percent in 2021.

According to The International Energy Agency, in order to reach net-zero by the Paris Agreement's 2050 target, global wind and solar energy needs make up 20 percent of total electricity by 2025, and 70 percent by 2050.

COO of global energy think tank Ember, Phil MacDonald, said in a statement:

"Wind and solar are breaking records around the world. The process that will reshape the existing energy system has begun. Wind and solar provide a solution to the "trilemma" of achieving a sustainable, affordable and secure energy supply. This decade they need to be deployed at lightning speed."

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10 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

No, real economists know that the cause is from pandemic caused parts shortages and supply chain failures pushed to crisis point by Putin's invasion,

No economist believes that, inflation is a monetary phenomenon. When monetary stimulus is applied to a full employment economy, you get inflation.

You never studied economics, Jay.

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(edited)

14 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

No economist believes that, inflation is a monetary phenomenon. When monetary stimulus is applied to a full employment economy, you get inflation.

You never studied economics, Jay.

You are such an economic simpleton. Inflation happens for many reasons, one of which is monetary.

In a broad view, inflation can happen for a variety of reasons. The most important ones are as follows:

  • The government is increasing the money supply faster than economic growth. When the government injects more money into the economy than it should, people tend to spend more. Simply put, there is more money trying to buy the same amount of goods, resulting in inflation.
  • Imported goods will be more expensive if the US Dollar is devalued.
  • When demand for goods rises across the economy, prices rise because supply cannot keep up.
  • A rise in the cost of production and raw materials can raise the price of goods in the economy.
  • When the national debt rises, governments either raise taxes or print more money, causing inflation to rise even more.

Monetary inflation is when prices go up without a change in the quantity demanded or supplied.

Prices however also go up when supply is less than demand. Basic economics. 

In the case at hand it is easily proven that the price increase is due to a decrease in supply and a return of demand to normal levels.

The car industry for example has decreased production and sales by 20% this year and car prices are up accordingly. Stimulus does not cause a decrease in automobile production and sales.

Total new vehicle sales for the entire industry in Q2 plunged by 20.8% from the beaten-down levels in Q2 last year, to 3.29 million vehicles. While up a tad from Q1, sales were down 21.3% from Q2 2019. These quarterly sales figures in the 3.3 million range were first seen in the 1970s.

US-auto-2022-07-05-new-vehicle-sales-quarterly.png

Not a demand issue, but a supply issue.

June started out with 1.13 million new vehicles in inventory on dealer lots and in transit, down by 70%, or by 2.68 million vehicles, from the same period in 2019, according to Cox Automotive, based on its Dealertrack data. In 2019, vehicle inventory averaged 3.66 million vehicles. So far this year, inventories averaged 1.10 million vehicles:

US-auto-2022-06-17-new-vehicles-inventory.png

 

Oil has decreased supply by millions of barrels per day because of the Russian invasion and prices are up accordingly. Easily seen by looking at the timing on the price spike just at the beginning of the war. That wasn't caused by stimulus.

image.png.8d4818696ded42bc702a5e07834b66e3.png 

 

Those higher oil prices promulgate through the supply chain for many items particularly food. 

Corn is a good example as it is fuel intensive. Note the price spike at the same tine as oil.

image.png.8956bc1f7a561392a33881757299171e.png

Wheat because Ukraine and Russia are major exporters. Down now because of bumper crops and the creation of an export channel from Odessa.

image.png.f0a4f2afa8ecf8738c663ec47a8ca275.png

If you understood economics you would understand this basic concept.

However the most famous barometer of monetary inflation is the price of gold.

Why Does Inflation Increase Gold Prices?

During monetary inflation, the costs of consumer goods increase and become more expensive., thereby making the dollar lose value. Since gold is dollar-denominated, its price also increases in line with the rising inflation.

This makes gold a good hedge against inflation as investors would be converting their cash holdings to gold to protect the value of their assets.  The increased interest from investors may set off a bull cycle in gold until the effect of inflation begins to cool off.

The price of gold however is down 4% YoY and is at the same level as May 2020. Long before Biden entered office.

image.thumb.png.b1781492e6e37c0defab6e3dc93447b5.png

And of course there is ultimately the value of the Dollar.

In general, monetary inflation tends to devalue a currency since inflation can be equated with a decrease in a money's buying power. As a result, countries experiencing high inflation tend to also see their currencies weaken relative to other currencies.

Turns out the dollar is at its highest level since 2003.

image.thumb.png.87bf05f7a9f5610ea58b6b9936c3649d.png

Oh but there is more. Monetary inflation causes a rise in all prices at about the same rate. But the CPI (which is the inflation measurement since you don't know anything about economics) shows clearly that energy is up 5 times as much as the everything else category and 3.5 times the food category.

image.thumb.png.4d668448693067f662e5c7dc0a5f838b.png

Isn't it amazing how you make some simpleton statement on economics with no data and I easily show a ton of data to prove you wrong. It is like I actually know economics and how to do economic research and you don't.

 

 

 

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On 7/10/2022 at 10:57 AM, Jay McKinsey said:

Offshore renewable energy improves habitat, increases fish

Jun 26, 2020

Offshore turbines and other renewable energy structures can have beneficial impacts on seafloor habitats and fish communities, said researchers from Belgium and the U.K. at a recent webinar on lessons learned from offshore renewable energy. 

The European scientists, whose countries have a long history with offshore renewable energy, shared their findings with U.S. colleagues who are eyeing proposals for thousands of offshore wind turbines to be installed in the U.S. Atlantic.

Andy Lipsky, who serves as the fisheries and offshore wind science lead for NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center, said, “It’s vital that we understand how these offshore wind developments interact with [other] existing uses and with our ecosystem.” He added that the U.S. has important wildlife and fisheries in the areas where the offshore wind farms are planned “and so sharing lessons learned from our European colleagues is vitally important.”

Jan Vanaverbeke, a senior scientist at the Royal Belgian Institute for Natural Sciences, Operational Directorate Natural Environment, Marine Ecology and Management Group, and a visiting professor at Ghent University, Belgium, said that scientists know that there is high biodiversity around the turbines, but researchers sought to determine whether the turbines are simply aggregators of fish, meaning they attract them from elsewhere, or whether they contribute to secondary production, meaning that because of the turbines there are actually higher numbers of fish in the water.

For the two commercial species that they studied at a Belgian offshore wind farm, researchers found evidence that the wind turbines not only attracted fish, providing both shelter and food (from the organisms that grew on the turbines), but also served a role in their life cycle, with young fish attracted to the wind farm where they would grow, then leave to spawn, and then other juveniles would come to the wind farm to grow. In a separate study, they also found that the presence of filter feeders on the turbines, such as mussels, increased the nutrients in the seafloor around the turbines. 

Emma Sheehan, a senior research fellow at the School of Biological and Marine Sciences and Faculty of Science and Engineering at the University of Plymouth, United Kingdom, looked at the impacts of wind farms and wave energy structures on seafloor habitats and species. She also talked about the interactions of offshore mussel aquaculture and fisheries. Her group’s research has shown that “in areas that were heavily degraded seabed, we’ve seen that the mussel shell fallout onto the seabed habitat seems to be increasing biodiversity. It’s restoring benthic habitats. It’s also increasing the benthic commercially valuable species such as lobster and crab on the seabed,” she said, as well as increasing commercially valuable bait species that fishermen will gather for use as they head off to their traditional fishing grounds.

More fish, that's great, but then again, there is this:

Offshore wind turbines interfere with ships’ radar, ability to navigate, study finds   

Credit:  David Larson | Carolina Journal | March 9, 2022 | www.carolinajournal.com ~~

 

Gov. Roy Cooper and the Biden administration want to make North Carolina carbon neutral by 2050, and President Biden’s ambitious plans to combat climate change lean heavily on offshore wind generation.

The turbines could be a problem for fishermen.

North Carolina’s fishing industry has largely been cautious in criticizing the wind turbines, saying it wants to wait for more information. But a new report on the impact of wind power on fishermen’s ability to navigate and operate radar could throw cold water on that uneasy truce and increase their insistence on keeping wind projects far from their fisheries. 

The late-February report from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, D.C., minced no words, saying, “Offshore wind farms can interfere with navigational radar used by ships and smaller vessels to avoid collisions, posing challenges for safe maritime navigation.” 

Amy Cooke is John Locke Foundation CEO and an energy expert who studies the industry. 

“Demolition derby on the high seas thanks to offshore industrial wind turbines? she asked. “Add maritime navigation and radar challenges to the long list of reasons – including high cost, unreliability, environmental damage and misleading nameplate capacity – as to why offshore industrial wind is absolutely horrible public policy.”

An executive order from Cooper in June 2021 directed state agencies to pursue a goal of 2.8 gigawatts of offshore wind energy by 2030. The goal had been to generate 8 GW by 2040. Afterward, Cooper worked with the legislature to create a compromise clean-energy bill, which he signed on Oct. 13, that will shutter some of the state’s coal plants and move the state toward using more wind and solar-generated power. 

The bill, H.B. 951, set targets for Duke Energy in reducing carbon dioxide, with a 70% reduction by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2050. As Cooper was signing the bill, the Biden administration unveiled a wind-energy plan that included the Wilmington area as one of its seven proposed hubs. 

“Governor Cooper will never achieve his stated goal of zero carbon emissions using offshore wind,” Cooke said. “Using offshore wind is likely to increase emissions with the increased need for backup production. Has anyone stopped to think why the Navy doesn’t power its fleet with industrial wind turbines? People who honestly care about emissions and making sure society has affordable, abundant, clean power champion nuclear energy. Those who advocate for offshore wind are either pandering to their base or profiteering off the backs of North Carolina electric customers.”

North Carolina’s large fishing industry has generally signaled they won’t challenge the wind projects as long as they avoid actively fished areas and areas they need to traverse. But with this report showing a clear link between the wind turbines and disruptions to radar and navigation in ships, the industry will likely continue to demand space between their fisheries and any wind-energy hubs. 

The report continues by explaining that wind-turbine generators “have significant electromagnetic reflectivity” that will “interfere with radar systems operating nearby.” In addition, NAS said, “The rotating blades can also create reflections in Doppler radar systems. In particular, these forms of interference could obfuscate smaller vessels and stationary objects such as buoys on radar, complicating navigation decisions and increasing the risk of collision with larger vessels.” 

All of this led to serious concerns about search-and-rescue teams’ ability to use radar in their operations, saying this interference would “complicate rescue operations near wind farms.” 

While the report is unlikely to halt the growth of wind energy on North Carolina’s coast, it does indicate that concerns about its impacts aren’t unfounded. 

Source:  David Larson | Carolina Journal | March 9, 2022 | www.carolinajournal.com

 


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6 minutes ago, JoMack said:

More fish, that's great, but then again, there is this:

Offshore wind turbines interfere with ships’ radar, ability to navigate, study finds   

Credit:  David Larson | Carolina Journal | March 9, 2022 | www.carolinajournal.com ~~

 

Gov. Roy Cooper and the Biden administration want to make North Carolina carbon neutral by 2050, and President Biden’s ambitious plans to combat climate change lean heavily on offshore wind generation.

The turbines could be a problem for fishermen.

North Carolina’s fishing industry has largely been cautious in criticizing the wind turbines, saying it wants to wait for more information. But a new report on the impact of wind power on fishermen’s ability to navigate and operate radar could throw cold water on that uneasy truce and increase their insistence on keeping wind projects far from their fisheries. 

The late-February report from the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, D.C., minced no words, saying, “Offshore wind farms can interfere with navigational radar used by ships and smaller vessels to avoid collisions, posing challenges for safe maritime navigation.” 

Amy Cooke is John Locke Foundation CEO and an energy expert who studies the industry. 

“Demolition derby on the high seas thanks to offshore industrial wind turbines? she asked. “Add maritime navigation and radar challenges to the long list of reasons – including high cost, unreliability, environmental damage and misleading nameplate capacity – as to why offshore industrial wind is absolutely horrible public policy.”

An executive order from Cooper in June 2021 directed state agencies to pursue a goal of 2.8 gigawatts of offshore wind energy by 2030. The goal had been to generate 8 GW by 2040. Afterward, Cooper worked with the legislature to create a compromise clean-energy bill, which he signed on Oct. 13, that will shutter some of the state’s coal plants and move the state toward using more wind and solar-generated power. 

The bill, H.B. 951, set targets for Duke Energy in reducing carbon dioxide, with a 70% reduction by 2030 and carbon neutrality by 2050. As Cooper was signing the bill, the Biden administration unveiled a wind-energy plan that included the Wilmington area as one of its seven proposed hubs. 

“Governor Cooper will never achieve his stated goal of zero carbon emissions using offshore wind,” Cooke said. “Using offshore wind is likely to increase emissions with the increased need for backup production. Has anyone stopped to think why the Navy doesn’t power its fleet with industrial wind turbines? People who honestly care about emissions and making sure society has affordable, abundant, clean power champion nuclear energy. Those who advocate for offshore wind are either pandering to their base or profiteering off the backs of North Carolina electric customers.”

North Carolina’s large fishing industry has generally signaled they won’t challenge the wind projects as long as they avoid actively fished areas and areas they need to traverse. But with this report showing a clear link between the wind turbines and disruptions to radar and navigation in ships, the industry will likely continue to demand space between their fisheries and any wind-energy hubs. 

The report continues by explaining that wind-turbine generators “have significant electromagnetic reflectivity” that will “interfere with radar systems operating nearby.” In addition, NAS said, “The rotating blades can also create reflections in Doppler radar systems. In particular, these forms of interference could obfuscate smaller vessels and stationary objects such as buoys on radar, complicating navigation decisions and increasing the risk of collision with larger vessels.” 

All of this led to serious concerns about search-and-rescue teams’ ability to use radar in their operations, saying this interference would “complicate rescue operations near wind farms.” 

While the report is unlikely to halt the growth of wind energy on North Carolina’s coast, it does indicate that concerns about its impacts aren’t unfounded. 

Source:  David Larson | Carolina Journal | March 9, 2022 | www.carolinajournal.com

 


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Well the North Sea is highly trafficked by freighters and fishermen and is full of wind turbines but no word on this being a problem they haven't solved.

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