JM

GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

Recommended Posts

(edited)

U.S. coal use and production is up substantially this year.

" Coal stockpiles declined by 16 million tons in February 2021, the largest inventory decline since July 2011.

-    Typically, coal stocks decline in the summer months, when coal demand surges. 

-    Rising natural gas prices in late 2020 and early 2021 have also increased coal demand, with coal generation up 16% in December 2020 and January 2021, from a year earlier. "

https://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.php?id=48436

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

Oil demand is exceeding expectations, oil inventories are shrinking fast.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Oil-Prices-Get-Another-Boost-From-Falling-Crude-Inventories.html

"The American Petroleum Institute (API) on Tuesday reported a draw in crude oil inventories of 7.199-million barrels for the week ending June 18.

Analysts had predicted a much smaller draw of 3.942 million barrels for the week.

In the previous week, the API reported a draw in oil inventories of 8.537 million barrels after analysts had predicted a draw of 3.290 million barrels. Crude oil inventories have fallen by more than 29 million barrels since the start of 2021, according to API data, but are still up 27 million barrels since January 2020."

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

3 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Oil demand is exceeding expectations, oil inventories are shrinking fast.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Oil-Prices-Get-Another-Boost-From-Falling-Crude-Inventories.html

"The American Petroleum Institute (API) on Tuesday reported a draw in crude oil inventories of 7.199-million barrels for the week ending June 18.

Analysts had predicted a much smaller draw of 3.942 million barrels for the week.

In the previous week, the API reported a draw in oil inventories of 8.537 million barrels after analysts had predicted a draw of 3.290 million barrels. Crude oil inventories have fallen by more than 29 million barrels since the start of 2021, according to API data, but are still up 27 million barrels since January 2020."

Oil inventories are still higher than they were three weeks ago.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Crude oil inventories have fallen by more than 29 million barrels since the start of 2021, according to API data, but are still up 27 million barrels since January 2020."

Inventories are down.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/21/2021 at 4:18 AM, Rob Plant said:

That first link you posted talked about the decline of coal pointing out that the highest peak was in 2013. You infer the last 7 years of coal consumption being below the 2013 levels as growth? That’s like calling Trump a winner with fewer votes. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Nope I'll repost so you can check the data again as you must have missed it first time around. Jay didnt and accepted that coal production is rising although perhaps not at the "hot" rate Ecocharger claimed, by the way I never claimed it was "hot"!

https://www.globaldata.com/global-coal-production-expected-rise-3-5-2021-says-globaldata/

Its not my data and I'm not "playing games with statistics" as you claim, if you take 2 seconds to look at it you will see that coal production is indeed growing and will likely grow to the highest production output the world has ever seen by 2025.

I'm not against renewables and I dont particularly like coal as it is a dirty form of energy IMO but the data is the data. As I said to Jay you cant warrant the future and any prediction is just a best guess so you could argue that this data isnt realistic for any number of reasons going forward, but you cant argue with data that has happened.

If those projections are correct there will indeed some coal growth. As it has been explained, that coal consumption has yet to show up. In general there have been moderate ups and downs since 2013. Most would call this era flat or plateaued.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It might be informative to look at diesel, gas and oil on a moving 5 year chart. Oil price even puts out nice charts once a month. The EIA also puts out a cool spreadsheet showing wells drilled, wells completed and wells drilled but uncompleted. This goes back several years. Then lastly the EIA has an import, export chart by the week that has history that goes back years. A once a month quick glance can give you not only current trends but how those trends compare over time. This is how you separate hype from reality.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

23 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Nope I'll repost so you can check the data again as you must have missed it first time around. Jay didnt and accepted that coal production is rising although perhaps not at the "hot" rate Ecocharger claimed, by the way I never claimed it was "hot"!

https://www.globaldata.com/global-coal-production-expected-rise-3-5-2021-says-globaldata/

Its not my data and I'm not "playing games with statistics" as you claim, if you take 2 seconds to look at it you will see that coal production is indeed growing and will likely grow to the highest production output the world has ever seen by 2025.

I'm not against renewables and I dont particularly like coal as it is a dirty form of energy IMO but the data is the data. As I said to Jay you cant warrant the future and any prediction is just a best guess so you could argue that this data isnt realistic for any number of reasons going forward, but you cant argue with data that has happened.

We all read stuff. Mostly it is a wait and see. For example did global data take into account the dispute between China and Australia. You read about industry being shut down a soaring coal prices. Are these projections taking taking that into account. I have no clue but we’ll know over the next few months. Coal with other commodities didn’t expect COVID. That’s the problem with speculation and why it’s called speculation. Nothing wrong with opinion, guesses, speculation and projection but those are opinions and should be presented as such. Only history is accurate and the reporting of history may take months to sort itself out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

59 minutes ago, Boat said:

That first link you posted talked about the decline of coal pointing out that the highest peak was in 2013. You infer the last 7 years of coal consumption being below the 2013 levels as growth? That’s like calling Trump a winner with fewer votes. 

growth definition
  1. something that has grown or is growing.
    "a day's growth of unshaven stubble on his chin"
     
    Now from the first link
    "After a major drop in recent years, global coal demand is forecast to rise by 2.6% in 2021 before flattening out to 2025"
     I believe by the definition of growth the fact it is increasing means it is growing!
     
    You cant compare the highest point and say it isnt growing now from a lower base! thats just plain stupid. Also WTF has Trump got to do with this? is climate change his fault as well??
  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Boat said:

We all read stuff. Mostly it is a wait and see. For example did global data take into account the dispute between China and Australia. You read about industry being shut down a soaring coal prices. Are these projections taking taking that into account. I have no clue but we’ll know over the next few months. Coal with other commodities didn’t expect COVID. That’s the problem with speculation and why it’s called speculation. Nothing wrong with opinion, guesses, speculation and projection but those are opinions and should be presented as such. Only history is accurate and the reporting of history may take months to sort itself out.

As I say its not my data, I didn't compile it. I also have stated that nobody can warrant the future and any projections are a best guess factoring in all the things you state.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

"Crude oil inventories have fallen by more than 29 million barrels since the start of 2021, according to API data, but are still up 27 million barrels since January 2020."

Inventories are down.

Finally some oil and gas development in the North Sea, well hopefully!

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/money/other/new-north-sea-oil-field-set-for-approval-ahead-of-cop26/ar-AALlcnB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

12 hours ago, Boat said:

That first link you posted talked about the decline of coal pointing out that the highest peak was in 2013. You infer the last 7 years of coal consumption being below the 2013 levels as growth? That’s like calling Trump a winner with fewer votes. 

Your arithmetic is sour...after 2013 a low, then recent periods of growth? That is impressive, considering the powerful anti-coal policies acting as a headwind. Coal demand has overcome the worst political fire-storm ever invented by the human mind.

Edited by Ecocharger
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/23/2021 at 1:04 AM, Boat said:

That first link you posted talked about the decline of coal pointing out that the highest peak was in 2013. You infer the last 7 years of coal consumption being below the 2013 levels as growth? That’s like calling Trump a winner with fewer votes. 

Well, Trump did win in 2016 with fewer votes. Sorry you're ignorant of the electoral college system. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

1 hour ago, QuarterCenturyVet said:

Well, Trump did win in 2016 with fewer votes. Sorry you're ignorant of the electoral college system. 

And Trump lost in 2020 with fewer votes and he got whopped in the Electoral College. Deal with it or are you as ignorant as Trump and all of the Trumpers who cannot deal with losing?

Edited by notsonice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

The Guardian

Jillian Ambrose Energy correspondent
Wed 23 Jun 2021 05.28 EDT

 

Most new wind and solar projects will be cheaper than coal, report finds

Almost two-thirds of renewable energy schemes built globally last year expected to undercut coal costs

Almost two-thirds of wind and solar projects built globally last year will be able to generate cheaper electricity than even the world’s cheapest new coal plants, according to a report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (Irena).

The agency found that the falling cost of new windfarms and solar panels meant 62% of new renewable energy projects could undercut the cost of up to 800 gigawatts (GW) worth of coal plants, or almost enough to supply the UK’s electricity needs 10 times over.

 

Solar power costs fell by 16% last year, according to the report, while the cost of onshore wind dropped 13% and offshore wind by 9%.

In less than a decade the cost of large-scale solar power has fallen by more than 85% while onshore wind has fallen almost 56% and offshore wind has declined by almost 48%. Francesco La Camera, Irena’s director general, said the agency’s latest research proved the world was “far beyond the tipping point of coal”.

He said: “Today renewables are the cheapest source of power. Renewables present countries tied to coal with an economically attractive phase-out agenda that ensures they meet growing energy demand, while saving costs, adding jobs, boosting growth and meeting climate ambition.”

In Europe, the cost of a new coal plant would be well above the cost of new wind and solar farms including mandatory carbon prices. The report found that in the US renewable energy could undercut between three-quarters and 91% of existing coal-fired power plants, while in India renewable energy would be cheaper than between 87% and 91% of new coal plants.

Replacing hundreds of existing coal plants with unsubsidised renewable energy sources could save $32.3bn (£22.8bn) every year in energy system costs and avoid about 3 gigatonnes of CO2annually, the report said.

The carbon saving from phasing out 800GW of coal power capacity would be the equivalent of shaving 9% from the world’s energy-related emissions last year, according to the report, or 20% of the carbon savings needed by 2030 to help limit global heating to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

The report predicts the cost of renewable energy will continue to fall in the coming years. Over the next two years three-quarters of all new solar power projects will be cheaper than new coal power plants, and onshore wind costs will be a quarter lower than the cheapest new coal-fired option.

“The trend confirms that low-cost renewables are not only the backbone of the electricity system, but that they will also enable electrification in end uses like transport, buildings and industry and unlock competitive indirect electrification with renewable hydrogen,” the report said.

Edited by notsonice
  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Amazon to invest in Canada's largest solar farm in race for sustainability

Wed., June 23, 2021, 6:47 a.m

Amazon (AMZN) has announced a plan to invest in 14 new renewable energy projects, including Canada's largest solar farm. The company now expects to fully power its vast operations from renewable sources by 2025, five years ahead of its original target.

The delivery giant laid claim to the title of the largest corporate buyer of renewable energy in the world on Wednesday. The company says new projects in Canada, Finland, Spain, and the U.S. bring its renewable energy investments to date to 10 gigawatts of electricity production capacity, enough to power 2.5 million American homes.

"Our investments in wind and solar energy in the U.S. and around the world send a signal that investing in green technologies is the right thing to do for the planet and citizens, as well as for the long-term success of businesses," chief executive officer Jeff Bezos stated in a news release.

Amazon says it will now have a total of 232 renewable energy projects globally, including 85 utility-scale wind and solar projects, and 147 solar rooftops on facilities and stores worldwide.

Wednesday's announcement included Amazon's second renewable energy project in Alberta, a 375 megawatt solar farm in Vulcan County. It is expected to come online in 2022. Amazon says its capacity in Canada will then hit more than one million megawatt hours, enough to power more than 100,000 Canadian homes.

"This is great news for our province and for all Albertans. Amazon's investment in our province means jobs for Albertans, and furthers Alberta's reputation as a diversified energy powerhouse," Alberta Premier Jason Kenney said in Wednesday's news release.

Jeff Lagerquist is a senior reporter at Yahoo Finance Canada.

 

 

 

 

 
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

18 hours ago, notsonice said:

The Guardian

 
Jillian Ambrose Energy correspondent
Wed 23 Jun 2021 05.28 EDT

 

Most new wind and solar projects will be cheaper than coal, report finds

Almost two-thirds of renewable energy schemes built globally last year expected to undercut coal costs

Almost two-thirds of wind and solar projects built globally last year will be able to generate cheaper electricity than even the world’s cheapest new coal plants, according to a report from the International Renewable Energy Agency (Irena).

The agency found that the falling cost of new windfarms and solar panels meant 62% of new renewable energy projects could undercut the cost of up to 800 gigawatts (GW) worth of coal plants, or almost enough to supply the UK’s electricity needs 10 times over.

 

Solar power costs fell by 16% last year, according to the report, while the cost of onshore wind dropped 13% and offshore wind by 9%.

In less than a decade the cost of large-scale solar power has fallen by more than 85% while onshore wind has fallen almost 56% and offshore wind has declined by almost 48%. Francesco La Camera, Irena’s director general, said the agency’s latest research proved the world was “far beyond the tipping point of coal”.

He said: “Today renewables are the cheapest source of power. Renewables present countries tied to coal with an economically attractive phase-out agenda that ensures they meet growing energy demand, while saving costs, adding jobs, boosting growth and meeting climate ambition.”

In Europe, the cost of a new coal plant would be well above the cost of new wind and solar farms including mandatory carbon prices. The report found that in the US renewable energy could undercut between three-quarters and 91% of existing coal-fired power plants, while in India renewable energy would be cheaper than between 87% and 91% of new coal plants.

Replacing hundreds of existing coal plants with unsubsidised renewable energy sources could save $32.3bn (£22.8bn) every year in energy system costs and avoid about 3 gigatonnes of CO2annually, the report said.

The carbon saving from phasing out 800GW of coal power capacity would be the equivalent of shaving 9% from the world’s energy-related emissions last year, according to the report, or 20% of the carbon savings needed by 2030 to help limit global heating to 1.5C above pre-industrial levels.

The report predicts the cost of renewable energy will continue to fall in the coming years. Over the next two years three-quarters of all new solar power projects will be cheaper than new coal power plants, and onshore wind costs will be a quarter lower than the cheapest new coal-fired option.

“The trend confirms that low-cost renewables are not only the backbone of the electricity system, but that they will also enable electrification in end uses like transport, buildings and industry and unlock competitive indirect electrification with renewable hydrogen,” the report said.

Full of challengeable material. Read the fine print,

"In Europe, the cost of a new coal plant would be well above the cost of new wind and solar farms including mandatory carbon prices. The report found that in the US renewable energy could undercut between three-quarters and 91% of existing coal-fired power plants, while in India renewable energy would be cheaper than between 87% and 91% of new coal plants."

So it claims "including mandatory carbon prices"...uh-oh, a big "if" here, in other words government policies and tax breaks are needed to help out with the cost comparisons here.

Also the usual nonsense about CO2 and climate change...fully discredited by recent science.

Check the article I cited above, showing that recent trends have wind/solar energy prices ratcheting up due to supply bottlenecks.

https://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Solar-Energy/Solar-Has-An-Unlikely-New-Enemy.html

"A recent Financial Times report noted that the shares of solar power companies have shed some 18 percent since the start of the year as the prices of steel, polysilicon, and transportation have all soared. The chief executive of the U.S. Solar Fund expects these higher raw material prices to boost new solar installation costs by as much as 20 percent. And the US Solar Industries Association warned this is only the beginning: “compounding cost increases across all materials are just beginning to affect installers,” the association said.

Perhaps S&P Platts analyst Bruno Brunetti put it best, as quoted by the FT: “The narrative in the solar industry has shifted,” Brunetti said. “We have seen steep declines in costs over the past decade, but we are seeing that stabilise now and even increase in some cases.”"

 

 

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

The oil sector is not deterred by wild government alarmism about the end of the world.

Oil is entering a new super-cycle.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Oil-Prices-Hit-3-Year-High-On-Draining-Inventories.html

"The higher prices are welcomed news for the oil markets, and can largely be attributed to falling U.S. inventories, a rosier oil demand outlook, and a statement made by the U.S. government contradicting Iran’s earlier statement that the U.S. had agreed to lift all sanctions related to Iranian crude oil."

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

27 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Full of challengeable material. Read the fine print,

"In Europe, the cost of a new coal plant would be well above the cost of new wind and solar farms including mandatory carbon prices. The report found that in the US renewable energy could undercut between three-quarters and 91% of existing coal-fired power plants, while in India renewable energy would be cheaper than between 87% and 91% of new coal plants."

So it claims "including mandatory carbon prices"...uh-oh, a big "if" here, in other words government policies and tax breaks are needed to help out with the cost comparisons here.

Also the usual nonsense about CO2 and climate change...fully discredited by recent science.

Check the article I cited above, showing that recent trends have wind/solar energy prices ratcheting up due to supply bottlenecks.

https://oilprice.com/Alternative-Energy/Solar-Energy/Solar-Has-An-Unlikely-New-Enemy.html

"A recent Financial Times report noted that the shares of solar power companies have shed some 18 percent since the start of the year as the prices of steel, polysilicon, and transportation have all soared. The chief executive of the U.S. Solar Fund expects these higher raw material prices to boost new solar installation costs by as much as 20 percent. And the US Solar Industries Association warned this is only the beginning: “compounding cost increases across all materials are just beginning to affect installers,” the association said.

Perhaps S&P Platts analyst Bruno Brunetti put it best, as quoted by the FT: “The narrative in the solar industry has shifted,” Brunetti said. “We have seen steep declines in costs over the past decade, but we are seeing that stabilise now and even increase in some cases.”"

 

 

"prices of steel, polysilicon, and transportation have all soared"

You know these same factors effect the "new coal plants" as well, no?

Even worse, it effects the delivered cost of the fuel!

Edited by turbguy
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 hours ago, turbguy said:

"prices of steel, polysilicon, and transportation have all soared"

You know these same factors effect the "new coal plants" as well, no?

Even worse, it effects the delivered cost of the fuel!

Even worse, the article points out that only government subsidies and tax breaks make renewables competitive with coal.

Coal prices themselves are soaring because of huge demand, including European demand.

Here is what the Wall Street Journal says today about the surge in coal,

"Prices for thermal coal—which power plants burn to boil water into steam, spin turbines and generate electricity—have more than doubled over the past year as a result. Coal delivered into northwest Europe earlier this month hit its highest price since November 2011, having climbed 64% in 2021. Prices for coal exported from Newcastle in Australia, most of which heads to Asia, have risen 56%, according to Argus Media. Both coal-price benchmarks have outstripped gains in oil, copper and other commodity markets that are benefiting from a vaccine-fired burst of economic activity. The upswing in fuel markets is contributing to higher electricity prices in the U.S. and Europe. Central banks are grappling with a jump in inflation powered in part by rising raw-material costs, though highflying commodities such as lumber have lost steam of late."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

Ohio bill to reform electric rates aims to preserve coal plant subsidies under attack in wake of corruption probe.

The Ohio coal subsidy corruption nightmare continues...

https://energynews.us/2021/06/21/ohio-bill-to-reform-electric-rates-aims-to-preserve-coal-plant-subsidies-under-attack-in-wake-of-corruption-probe/

Edited by Jay McKinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.