Denmark Dismisses U.S. Suspicions of Spy Risk in Nord Stream 2

The Defence Minister of Denmark has dismissed worries about Russia putting spying equipment on Nord Stream 2. That's after Sweden granted all necessary permits. NATO's top man is being diplomatic: "As you can see, there are different opinions on Nord Stream among the allies." You don't say, Jens.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the drama gets more and more interesting regarding this gas pipeline, where Russia seems to be in the game again of the pipelines, this time of Nord Stream 2. And this reaction from Denmark is a little bit strange, since all the baltic and scandinavian countries are highly dependent on russian gas to their pain and have been ultimately in the lookout for alternative sources of gas. Really weird this reaction. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Someone mentioned in the film thread something about the TV series Occupied ... this is it. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And someone--me--actually watched the series and no, that's not it. 

@jose chalhoub, it's a demonstration of common sense. What everyone seems to forget is that there already is a Russian gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea. To spell it out, if Russia wanted to put spying equipment on the pipeline it could have done so a million times since the building of the Nord Stream 1.

I don't think Scandinavia is so heavily dependent on Russian gas but I haven't checked figures.

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 minutes ago, Marina Schwarz said:

To spell it out, if Russia wanted to put spying equipment on the pipeline it could have done so a million times since the building of the Nord Stream 1.

Exactly. The irrational fears generated from the ZOMG RUSSIA hyperventilating by US media can be amusing.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I wish it were only the US media but it isn't. The probplem with Europe's overreliance on just one source of gas is serious and real enough to have it watered down by conspiracy theories. What, I'd like to know, is happening with TAP? Just build it already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Marina Schwarz said:

Oh, I wish it were only the US media but it isn't. The probplem with Europe's overreliance on just one source of gas is serious and real enough to have it watered down by conspiracy theories. What, I'd like to know, is happening with TAP? Just build it already.

For Europe, increasing the share of renewables is the best way to reduce dependence on foreign gas and oil.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a reliable way, though it too comes at a cost, but I still think diversity of oil/gas supplies is safer for now, until they solve that intermittency problem once and for all. After that, it can be "go, renewables" all across Europe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Marina Schwarz said:

It is a reliable way, though it too comes at a cost, but I still think diversity of oil/gas supplies is safer for now, until they solve that intermittency problem once and for all. After that, it can be "go, renewables" all across Europe.

East european countries are trying to promote LNG imports to reduce their dependence on russian gas. But it's not easy as we can see with the croatian Krk LNG terminal project facing some opposition.

http://balkaneu.com/lng-sets-the-balkans-on-fire/

But this kind of diversification is more political than economical. Importing LNG from a distant country (US or Qatar) is more expensive than importing russian gas by pipeline.

Germany seems to be less concerned than east european countries on russian gas imports. And after the recent G7 meltdown Merkel will probably consider Putin as a more reliable trade partner than Trump.

  • Like 2
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree it's more political than economical and history has shown that when political takes the upper hand over economical, the outcome is rarely positive for the people who foot the bill, i.e., us, ordinary folk. I really couldn't care less where my gas comes from. What I care about is not having to pay through the nose for electricity. I'm sure that's what most people care about, too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites