Ron Wagner

How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy

Recommended Posts

(edited)

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-far-have-we-really-gotten-with-alternative-energy-11636571966?mod=ig_energyreport

 

How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy?

There’s a lot of hype and confusion about carbon-free energy sources. Here’s a look at five of them: how much they produce, what they cost, and what obstacles they face.

Edited by Ron Wagner
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Ron Wagner said:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/how-far-have-we-really-gotten-with-alternative-energy-11636571966?mod=ig_energyreport

 

How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy?

There’s a lot of hype and confusion about carbon-free energy sources. Here’s a look at five of them: how much they produce, what they cost, and what obstacles they face.

Paywall

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry about the paywall. I got a cheap deal and find the WSJ to be well worth it. I have to be careful how much of a story I can post. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

25 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

Sorry about the paywall. I got a cheap deal and find the WSJ to be well worth it. I have to be careful how much of a story I can post. 

Then why post it?

This is from BP https://www.bp.com/content/dam/bp/business-sites/en/global/corporate/images-svg/energy-economics/statistical-review-of-world-energy/share-of-global-electricity-generation-by-fuel-stsr21-bp.svg

image.thumb.png.9c70ac7201e7a6f0be537032272f2240.png

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good question. Why not get a subscription and widen your knowledge base. The WSJ is pretty basic source material for anyone interested in energy and the economy.  There are ways around the restrictions too. 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

Good question. Why not get a subscription and widen your knowledge base. The WSJ is pretty basic source material for anyone interested in energy and the economy.  There are ways around the restrictions too. 

Yeah, you could post the entire contents of the article so I could tell you where it is wrong.

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Yeah, you could post the entire contents of the article so I could tell you where it is wrong.

Yeah, you know more than the WSJ. 🤣

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

21 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

Yeah, you know more than the WSJ. 🤣

In regard to renewable energy? Absolutely I do. 

That might explain why my numbers are right and your numbers are almost always wrong.

I think the reason you won't post the article is because you know it is mostly BS.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
  • Great Response! 1
  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I like that world chart posted the other day. It looks like green is growing 1% a year.  Putin is hurting FF’s future. Will green growth pick up? Some think so, others hope not. Lol One percent or one percent+ works for me. In 30 years that’s a lot of pollution taken out. Those of us that think green progress will be much faster are getting validation for being cheer leaders 15 years ago. We’ll we will see. 
I remember when the US was green at 1/3 of one percent per year. Today it’s close to 30% non FF.

One last transportation + as we move to an electric future. The huge amount of energy used to refine oil like gasoline and diesel will change the industry forever. Nat gas will be a big winner in the north, at least for now. For me, net zero is much further away, I’m thinking 45/50% by 2050. 

  • Great Response! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

In regard to renewable energy? Absolutely I do. 

That might explain why my numbers are right and your numbers are almost always wrong.

I think the reason you won't post the article is because you know it is mostly BS.

You are a master of overstatement. Other than that you have some good information. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, Ron Wagner said:

Yeah, you know more than the WSJ. 🤣

WSJ was mocked as "fake news" during election time but now that it reports something you like it is reputable.

Remember this the next time they report trumps crimes.

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Boat said:

I like that world chart posted the other day. It looks like green is growing 1% a year.  Putin is hurting FF’s future. Will green growth pick up? Some think so, others hope not. Lol One percent or one percent+ works for me. In 30 years that’s a lot of pollution taken out. Those of us that think green progress will be much faster are getting validation for being cheer leaders 15 years ago. We’ll we will see. 
I remember when the US was green at 1/3 of one percent per year. Today it’s close to 30% non FF.

One last transportation + as we move to an electric future. The huge amount of energy used to refine oil like gasoline and diesel will change the industry forever. Nat gas will be a big winner in the north, at least for now. For me, net zero is much further away, I’m thinking 45/50% by 2050. 

 

the graph says it all..........

 

Coal is getting creamed by renewables today, In 10 more years Renewables will have a 30 percent share of electrical power generation world wide. In Europe 50 percent for wind,solar and hyrdo  and Nuclear with 25 percent Biomass will be at 5 percent. Coal....gone....Nat gas decreasing to half of what it is today.......Enjoy 

 

TW.image_.2-600x690.png

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/18/2022 at 1:28 AM, notsonice said:

Coal is getting creamed by renewables today

You seen the price of coal as of late? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

3 hours ago, KeyboardWarrior said:

You seen the price of coal as of late? 

The high price of coal drives customers to use substitutes that are less expensive and less volatile. The entire argument in support of coal has been that it is cheap. You really need to take a few courses in economics.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/17/2022 at 12:03 AM, Ron Wagner said:

Yeah, you know more than the WSJ. 🤣

Several lib-tards are trying to control the narratives in all the discussions. They know who they are. Just ignore 'em @ronwagn

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is interesting how this is possible. I am sure there are a lot of actual Americans out here who put off due to the bullshit being spewed by the left wing zealots who abide here. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

It must be a real bummer having real Americans post all this real and current data being posted to debunk all your false narratives.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

The high price of coal drives customers to use substitutes that are less expensive and less volatile. The entire argument in support of coal has been that it is cheap. You really need to take a few courses in economics.

I seem to recall that a surge in demand drove the price up. You really need to take a few courses in economics. 

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Jay McKinsey Coal had to make up for what renewables couldn't produce in these last six months. Does that sound like renewables win the reliability contest? 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, KeyboardWarrior said:

@Jay McKinsey Coal had to make up for what renewables couldn't produce in these last six months. Does that sound like renewables win the reliability contest? 

It takes time to build enough renewables to satisfy demand and storage at scale is just entering the market. Storage makes renewables reliable. Fossil fuels will continue to play a backup role until they aren't needed. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

20 hours ago, KeyboardWarrior said:

I seem to recall that a surge in demand drove the price up. You really need to take a few courses in economics. 

The surge in demand was for electricity. Coal was available as was natural gas and both increased in price. This will lead to a net loss for both because of decisions to invest more in less expensive renewables. I think my two degrees in economics is enough.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

On 3/17/2022 at 11:28 PM, notsonice said:

 

the graph says it all..........

 

Coal is getting creamed by renewables today, In 10 more years Renewables will have a 30 percent share of electrical power generation world wide. In Europe 50 percent for wind,solar and hyrdo  and Nuclear with 25 percent Biomass will be at 5 percent. Coal....gone....Nat gas decreasing to half of what it is today.......Enjoy 

 

TW.image_.2-600x690.png

Next time publish cost of electricity over time...

UK 2010 12.7 pence/kWh  = $0.15kWH USD 2021(before the war) 21.2 pence/kWh. https://www.nimblefins.co.uk/average-cost-electricity-kwh-uk#nogo

So, 15% of grid is "renewable" and price has increased by 80% in same time frame.  Brilliant. 

US 2010 10.5c/kWh--> 11.5cKWh~ and 2021 is now ~13.5c-->15cKWh USD and USA  went from 5% renewable(hydro) to 12%

All this before inflation. If account for inflation, USA energy price dropped in middle, mountain, and South of country but New England/California price went WAAAAYYYY up as did not allow for nat gas pipes to be built. 

Difference USA released vast quantities of NG and UK did not.

Moral to story, no nat gas + renewables = you are screwed and will only get worse.

Edited by footeab@yahoo.com

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

3 hours ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

Difference USA released vast quantities of NG and UK did not.

Moral to story, no nat gas + renewables = you are screwed and will only get worse.

The UK's powergen in 2021 was made up of 38.5% NG, 44% of which was from its own production.

NG is the predominant form of energy used in UK powergen, however renewables are catching up fast especially wind power, coupled with many large scale battery storage back ups to maintain reliability. Renewables were 25.5%, with wind 20.1% of that total.

https://grid.iamkate.com/

https://www.nationalworld.com/lifestyle/money/where-does-the-uk-get-gas-from-how-much-is-imported-from-russia-current-supply-and-if-theres-a-gas-shortage-3391351

The UK is extremely fortunate geographically to have the gulf stream blowing along its coastline almost all of the time. Once the infrastructure is built it is low cost. Wind power as an energy source is free NG isnt.

Moral of the story is the UK's wind power currently creates 10's of thousands of jobs and has saved many historical oil & gas businesses as they diversify their skills into renewables. The US is set to have a lot more wind turbines on and offshore in the next few years so get used to them.

Edited by Rob Plant
  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Rob Plant said:

The UK's powergen in 2021 was made up of 38.5% NG, 44% of which was from its own production.

NG is the predominant form of energy used in UK powergen, however renewables are catching up fast especially wind power, coupled with many large scale battery storage back ups to maintain reliability. Renewables were 25.5%, with wind 20.1% of that total.

https://grid.iamkate.com/

https://www.nationalworld.com/lifestyle/money/where-does-the-uk-get-gas-from-how-much-is-imported-from-russia-current-supply-and-if-theres-a-gas-shortage-3391351

The UK is extremely fortunate geographically to have the gulf stream blowing along its coastline almost all of the time. Once the infrastructure is built it is low cost. Wind power as an energy source is free NG isnt.

Moral of the story is the UK's wind power currently creates 10's of thousands of jobs and has saved many historical oil & gas businesses as they diversify their skills into renewables. The US is set to have a lot more wind turbines on and offshore in the next few years so get used to them.

Everyone can dream of batteries.  Reality says otherwise.  So, until then, pray for more NG if one installs more wind/solar. 

And yes, wind turbines in the Great plains is going up everywhere along with massive numbers of NG turbines to compensate when the wind does not blow. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

Everyone can dream of batteries.  Reality says otherwise.  So, until then, pray for more NG if one installs more wind/solar. 

And yes, wind turbines in the Great plains is going up everywhere along with massive numbers of NG turbines to compensate when the wind does not blow. 

We need both FF and renewables.

Countries like Germany are in deep trouble and beholden to Putin.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.