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Energy Armageddon

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On 1/17/2023 at 7:37 AM, Metalmania said:

I remember the 28% Rule from college, it's a nice theory but doesn't work in CA and probably many other places in the US and abroad. This "rule" would require everyone to earn (net) $100k+ to properly afford housing, and that's far from reality. EV's don't last 10 years (at least the batteries don't) and longest auto loan here is 5 years. I'm still driving a 2009 Toyota with 200k miles on it. Text Book rules make for great discussions but aren't practical for real life.   

what a load of BS...

car loans in the US ? longest 7 years

 

now on to your total BS on batteries........(I hope you know the difference between lead-acid and lithium based batteries)

 

EV's don't last 10 years (at least the batteries don't)??? is just utter BS

 

the highlights of the following article

How Does EV Battery Longevity Compare to ICE Vehicles?

Both of the mandated warranty numbers (8 years, 100,000 miles) for EV batteries far exceed the average ICE vehicle drivetrain warranty of 5 years or 60,000 miles. The average lifetime mileage of an ICE vehicle is about 133,000 miles. While experts estimate the average EV battery will last around 200,000 miles, some manufacturers already promise much more than that. 

 

And the news gets better: Tesla has their sights set on a million-mile battery, and claims that they are not far from achieving this goal

 

 

EV Connect

How Long Does an Electric Car Battery Last?

Nov 8
Written By EV Connect

As electric cars and other electric vehicles (EVs) become more popular, many consumers hoping to make the switch want to know: How long does an EV battery last? While battery life span varies by manufacturer and age, in general you can expect new batteries to rival and often exceed the longevity of drivetrain components on internal combustion engine (ICE) Vehicles. 

EV Batteries: The Basics

Electric cars are powered by rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are more energy dense than the lead-acid batteries found in internal combustion engines or rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries found in some hybrids. A lithium-ion battery’s high energy density means it produces more power for its size, making it ideal for an electric car.

 

Because EVs are powered by the battery alone, they are far more simple and efficient than ICE vehicles. As lithium-ion batteries have decreased in cost by 97% over the last 30 years, experts believe that EVs will soon be as cheap to produce as ICE vehicles. 

 

How Do EV Batteries Degrade?

EV batteries typically degrade due to temperature, cycles and time. Storage and operating temperatures have a huge impact on EV battery longevity; in general, warmer climates negatively affect the lifespan of an EV battery. As the battery goes through charge cycles — discharged while driving and charged back up while plugged in — it slowly loses maximum potential. However, simply not using or charging your EV battery does not mean it will last forever: Calendar degradation is the battery losing life over time.

 

Unlike the lithium-ion batteries found in a phone or laptop, EV batteries utilize complex battery management systems (BMS) that regulate how the batteries are charged and discharged to prolong their life. That means your EV battery is most likely to experience temperature or calendar degradation.

 

How Long Does an Electric Car Battery Last?

So the question remains: How long can you expect your EV battery to last? Fortunately for consumers, the government mandates EV manufacturers to warranty batteries for 8 years or 100,000 miles, while California extends that warranty to 10 years or 150,000 miles.

 

As EV battery packs become cheaper to manufacture, companies can create larger batteries with more energy potential, which in turn increases their mile-range. Additionally, the improved technology reduces the degradation of batteries, meaning that over time the maximum potential stays closer to the new battery. And because newer batteries already have greatly increased in mileage range, as they degrade they will still maintain a longer mileage range than batteries from just a few years ago. Finally, because lithium-ion batteries are made up of many individual cells, you rarely need to replace the entire battery as it degrades. Instead, you can save money by simply replacing dead cells. 

 

How Does EV Battery Longevity Compare to ICE Vehicles?

Both of the mandated warranty numbers (8 years, 100,000 miles) for EV batteries far exceed the average ICE vehicle drivetrain warranty of 5 years or 60,000 miles. The average lifetime mileage of an ICE vehicle is about 133,000 miles. While experts estimate the average EV battery will last around 200,000 miles, some manufacturers already promise much more than that. 

 

And the news gets better: Tesla has their sights set on a million-mile battery, and claims that they are not far from achieving this goal. On average, EV batteries only degrade at a rate of 2.3% of maximum capacity per year, so with proper care you can reliably expect your EV battery to last as long or longer than ICE drivetrain components. 

 

How To Extend EV Battery Life

While EV batteries are already durable, there are specific actions owners can take to further maximize battery lifespan.

 

Follow EV Manufacturer Guidelines

First, it is important to follow your EV’s specific guidelines for optimal battery performance, as well as keep your vehicle’s software up to date. Because each EV manufacturer utilizes different battery chemistries and cooling technologies, each will have its own set of optimal operating and charging instructions.

 

Maintain Moderate Temperatures

EVs with liquid-cooled batteries see better battery life retention because they maintain lower operating temperatures. In general, storing and operating your EV in moderate climates is an effective way to extend battery life. Even if you live in a warmer climate, parking your vehicle in a garage or well-shaded area helps, as a vehicle spends most of its life parked. 

 

Minimize Rapid Charging

While occasionally utilizing direct current rapid charging (DCRC) to power your vehicle is okay, if you can minimize the frequency of this charging method, you are likely to see less battery degradation later in its life. Luckily, EV Connect offers a variety of charging stations to ensure a number of efficient solutions for your vehicle. And remember: Don’t be afraid to use your EV, as frequent use is not a major factor in battery degradation. 

 

An EV Battery’s Second Life

One of the most exciting aspects of EV battery degradation for eco-conscious consumers is the fact that batteries can still serve a sustainable purpose after they leave your EV. Even as they lose efficiency to power a car (usually at 70% of their maximum charge potential), these powerful EV batteries retain enough life to pair with solar and can serve as secondary energy for your home. Some manufacturers even collect or buy back used batteries to sustainably power other projects, such as sports arenas. You can feel secure in knowing that the sustainability of your EV’s power continues long after it leaves your vehicle. 

 

EV batteries continue to decrease in cost, travel more miles on a charge and retain longer life spans. Experts already suggest that EV batteries will exceed the longevity of ICE components, and the technology improves every year. It’s all good news: Your EV battery will serve your needs for years to come, and it can even be sustainably recycled after its life from powering your vehicle.

 

Interested in EV charging stations? Connect with us today.

 

 

 

Edited by notsonice
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(edited)

15 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Agreed Ron but my point was you can buy a Chevy Bolt that is competitive with many brand new main stream ICE vehicles at $25K.

I dont consider that a luxury vehicle or a status symbol.

In what screwed up world is a Chevy Bolt competitive?  Its starting price is $28k + tax ~ $30k minimum.  Uses old battery tech where the cells quickly degrade.  How quickly... we only have the prior bolts, leaf's etc to look at and well... it is not pretty at all.  It is why people buy a TESLA with the better battery tech where a couple cars have easily surpassed 500,000 miles and counting already. 

On a perfect sunny day Chevy Bolt has ~200 miles of range with NEW batteries(not decade old batteries)... a commuter car.  Ok.  Great. Can charge at home cheaply.  Wonderful, no one disagrees yet assuming you are buying new and if commuter car, why the Hell would you buy new though?  One would have to be stupid to do so.  If you pay more than $8k for a commuter car there is something wrong with you.  A Ford Focus or Honda Civic with less than 100k miles tells for under 8k.  They have over 100,000 miles of life left.  I can buy decades of gasoline/maintenance for $20,000 and have money left over for rest of life.  Now the kicker; On a cold winter day Said POS Chevy Bolt has half that range and nowhere to charge it other than home unless you live in a big city, assuming you are on the right side of the city and then more than likely the charger is broken or eternally slow. 

Yes, A new car is a luxury status symbol to anyone with a financial functioning brain who looks to the future instead of their ego, pride, and vanity. 

PS: EDIT: When a used LONG range Tesla 3 gets down to under $20k, then it might make sense to buy it judging by its battery degradation curves currently.  Due to cheap cost of charging at home it might pencil out.  Haven't done the exact math, but would probably still have ~200 miles of range at that point. 

Edited by footeab@yahoo.com
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8 hours ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

In what screwed up world is a Chevy Bolt competitive?  Its starting price is $28k + tax ~ $30k minimum.  Uses old battery tech where the cells quickly degrade.  How quickly... we only have the prior bolts, leaf's etc to look at and well... it is not pretty at all.  It is why people buy a TESLA with the better battery tech where a couple cars have easily surpassed 500,000 miles and counting already. 

On a perfect sunny day Chevy Bolt has ~200 miles of range with NEW batteries(not decade old batteries)... a commuter car.  Ok.  Great. Can charge at home cheaply.  Wonderful, no one disagrees yet assuming you are buying new and if commuter car, why the Hell would you buy new though?  One would have to be stupid to do so.  If you pay more than $8k for a commuter car there is something wrong with you.  A Ford Focus or Honda Civic with less than 100k miles tells for under 8k.  They have over 100,000 miles of life left.  I can buy decades of gasoline/maintenance for $20,000 and have money left over for rest of life.  Now the kicker; On a cold winter day Said POS Chevy Bolt has half that range and nowhere to charge it other than home unless you live in a big city, assuming you are on the right side of the city and then more than likely the charger is broken or eternally slow. 

Yes, A new car is a luxury status symbol to anyone with a financial functioning brain who looks to the future instead of their ego, pride, and vanity. 

PS: EDIT: When a used LONG range Tesla 3 gets down to under $20k, then it might make sense to buy it judging by its battery degradation curves currently.  Due to cheap cost of charging at home it might pencil out.  Haven't done the exact math, but would probably still have ~200 miles of range at that point. 

A new Ford Focus is $18-50K

Should I Buy the 2023 Honda Civic?

The Civic is a must-see if you're shopping for a new compact car. It does everything you could ask of an affordably priced car, and it does so with a level of refinement that rivals much pricier machinery. The caveat is that the new Civic isn't the bargain it once was. Prices start at roughly $25,000.

The Chevy Bolt will be cheaper to run,and service

Not saying the Bolt is a great car but its in the bracket of the other 2.

I agree the Tesla is a much better long term purchase but thats if you can afford it in the first place!

We were talking about price comparisons of similar cars that are new and you seem to have gone off on a tangent as usual comparing second/third hand cars that have done 100K miles compared to the price of a brand new one! D'uh, apples and pears spring to mind!

 

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11 hours ago, notsonice said:

what a load of BS...

car loans in the US ? longest 7 years

 

now on to your total BS on batteries........(I hope you know the difference between lead-acid and lithium based batteries)

 

EV's don't last 10 years (at least the batteries don't)??? is just utter BS

 

 

 

 

Unfortunately many on here dont believe in researching just spout BS they heard from retards and believe it because theyre too lazy to do a bit of research themselves.

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3 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Unfortunately many on here dont believe in researching just spout BS they heard from retards and believe it because theyre too lazy to do a bit of research themselves.

Or maybe they've had contact with real life EV owners who have had the extreme joy (sic) of living through the nightmare of EV "warranty" coverage. Sorry, but I'll keep my Toyota.

 

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7 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

A new Ford Focus is $18-50K

Should I Buy the 2023 Honda Civic?

The Civic is a must-see if you're shopping for a new compact car. It does everything you could ask of an affordably priced car, and it does so with a level of refinement that rivals much pricier machinery. The caveat is that the new Civic isn't the bargain it once was. Prices start at roughly $25,000.

The Chevy Bolt will be cheaper to run,and service

Not saying the Bolt is a great car but its in the bracket of the other 2.

I agree the Tesla is a much better long term purchase but thats if you can afford it in the first place!

We were talking about price comparisons of similar cars that are new and you seem to have gone off on a tangent as usual comparing second/third hand cars that have done 100K miles compared to the price of a brand new one! D'uh, apples and pears spring to mind!

 

Poor guy, can't make the mental jump to what a commuter car is and plays make believe a new car is used as a commuter car in any rational world for the average person(big hint its not).  There is roughly 1 vehicle for every person in the USA and new sales are ~13 million/year if I remember the ol stats correctly....  Big hint with simple math, everyone buys used and a few people buy new.  Average age is ~12 years old per vehicle.  And the Chevy bolt has ~100 miles range when brand new batteries are used, in the cold during this thing called winter.  Good luck running around for an entire day on that long term.  Its comparisons are old ICE commuter cars.  And yes, you buy them for under $8k.  No, $30k is not equal to $8k. 

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(edited)

4 hours ago, footeab@yahoo.com said:

Poor guy, can't make the mental jump to what a commuter car is and plays make believe a new car is used as a commuter car in any rational world for the average person(big hint its not).  There is roughly 1 vehicle for every person in the USA and new sales are ~13 million/year if I remember the ol stats correctly....  Big hint with simple math, everyone buys used and a few people buy new.  Average age is ~12 years old per vehicle.  And the Chevy bolt has ~100 miles range when brand new batteries are used, in the cold during this thing called winter.  Good luck running around for an entire day on that long term.  Its comparisons are old ICE commuter cars.  And yes, you buy them for under $8k.  No, $30k is not equal to $8k. 

If you are "running around for an entire day" it is not a commuter car.

My commute plus a grocery stop is maybe 20km round trip.  The vast majority of car trips are short.

The taxi's around here (who do run around all day) are almost all Prius hybrids.

Many new city buses are battery electric.

https://www.edmonton.ca/projects_plans/transit/electric-buses

Edited by TailingsPond
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On 1/18/2023 at 2:52 AM, Rob Plant said:

Agreed Ron but my point was you can buy a Chevy Bolt that is competitive with many brand new main stream ICE vehicles at $25K.

I dont consider that a luxury vehicle or a status symbol.

 

On 1/18/2023 at 2:52 AM, Rob Plant said:

Agreed Ron but my point was you can buy a Chevy Bolt that is competitive with many brand new main stream ICE vehicles at $25K.

I dont consider that a luxury vehicle or a status symbol.

Out the door it costs almost twice the price of a Mitsubishi Mirage which gets 40 mpg. and has the best warranty in the business. There are many ICE choices that are far larger and more luxurious for the real out the door price. The lower priced options would be a better value IMHO. I think that hybrids would be the way to go for the most value, if the price was right. The lowest priced Bolt is now $26,500 It would be a lot more out the door. It would be a luxury for someone who thought they could get by with a Mitsubishi Mirage. We love ours. 

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On 1/18/2023 at 2:52 AM, Rob Plant said:

Agreed Ron but my point was you can buy a Chevy Bolt that is competitive with many brand new main stream ICE vehicles at $25K.

I dont consider that a luxury vehicle or a status symbol.

I go for the average extras usually, but my wife likes the fully loaded. The most expensive vehicle we ever purchased was our NV 3500 Nissan for $40,000 about six years ago. It is larger than a Grand Wagoneer and has 12 large leather seats. I could probably sell it for $70, 000 right now. It has all the luxury a value vehicle needs.

10 lowest price ICE vehicles starting with the most expensive which is equal to the Bolt pricewise.

 https://www.motortrend.com/features/top-10-cheapest-new-cars/?slide=1

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The Cheapest New Cars for 2023:

  1. 2023 Honda Civic Sport Sedan: Base Price $24,650
  2. 2023 MINI Hardtop Classic 2-Door Hatchback: Base Price $23,400
  3. 2023 Mazda Mazda3 S Sedan: Base Price $22,550
  4. 2023 Toyota Corolla LE Sedan: Base Price $21,550
  5. 2023 Hyundai Elantra SE Sedan: Base Price $20,500
  6. 2023 Volkswagen Jetta S (Manual) Sedan: Base Price $20,415
  7. 2023 Subaru Impreza (Manual) Sedan: Base Price $19,795
  8. 2023 Kia Forte LX Sedan: Base Price $19,490
  9. 2023 Nissan Versa S: Base Price Estimate $15,880
  10. 2023 Mitsubishi Mirage ES Hatchback: Base Price $16,245
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7 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

Offshore Oil And Gas Is Back, Baby

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Offshore-Oil-And-Gas-Is-Back-Baby.html

Long overdue!

 

the Author puts no hard facts behind her babble...No forecast on demand...no forecasts on long term pricing for oil or LNG...no forecasts on LNG demand

does not factor in Oil has peaked and in 2 years EVs will be produced at 25 million units a year....thereby ending any chance of long term demand increases for ICE vehicles....ICE vehicle production is in decline now

Reality in 2025 the amount of ICE vehicles on the road will no longer be rising and the demand for oil to fuel for ICE vehicles will be in decline (due to the fact that newer ICE vehicles are much more efficient than the 15 to 20 year old vehicles they are replacing plus EVs.)

I read the article and found the Author totally lacking any credible argument that Oil and Gas is Back - baby

the fact is Nat Gas is already back to oversupply and the capture of typically flared gases is at the forefront in the oversupply in nat gas.

Last is Russia, they caused a shortage in the market....How long does anyone think Putin himself will last.....

The way he is going ....I would predict he is taken out by one of his own in the next 2 years

Enjoy as the markets are in a bear market.........oversupply is the rule of the day now

 

Oil and Gas are facing long term permanent decline

 

more like Old man Oil and Nat Gas is dying a slow painful death thanks to Renewables and EV's

 

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9 hours ago, notsonice said:

the Author puts no hard facts behind her babble...No forecast on demand...no forecasts on long term pricing for oil or LNG...no forecasts on LNG demand

does not factor in Oil has peaked and in 2 years EVs will be produced at 25 million units a year....thereby ending any chance of long term demand increases for ICE vehicles....ICE vehicle production is in decline now

Reality in 2025 the amount of ICE vehicles on the road will no longer be rising and the demand for oil to fuel for ICE vehicles will be in decline (due to the fact that newer ICE vehicles are much more efficient than the 15 to 20 year old vehicles they are replacing plus EVs.)

I read the article and found the Author totally lacking any credible argument that Oil and Gas is Back - baby

the fact is Nat Gas is already back to oversupply and the capture of typically flared gases is at the forefront in the oversupply in nat gas.

Last is Russia, they caused a shortage in the market....How long does anyone think Putin himself will last.....

The way he is going ....I would predict he is taken out by one of his own in the next 2 years

Enjoy as the markets are in a bear market.........oversupply is the rule of the day now

 

Oil and Gas are facing long term permanent decline

 

more like Old man Oil and Nat Gas is dying a slow painful death thanks to Renewables and EV's

 

I agree with you that ICE vehicles will inevitably decline especially post 2030, however the world still needs oil.

Wells are declining on their output volumes, nothing lasts forever, we need new investment in new finds to develop these as very little  has been done since before Covid mainly due to banks being unwilling to invest in oil & gas for political reasons rather than ROI.

If you think the world wont need oil & gas when there are zero ICE vehicles then you are crazy!

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Anyone building a new Electricity Power Plant? Nothing here in California that I know of. My NG Bill has tripled despite adequate supplies and out electrical bill has doubled (SCE blaming the cost of NG). I live in the real world and not a fantasy land. 

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As I have said before, Oil and Natural Gas will continue to be developed all over the world. It is a practical reality that will not go away. In fact we will use more than ever worldwide.

 

U.S. Fightback In the Middle East Continues With Huge Chevron Deal

By Simon Watkins - Jan 24, 2023, 6:00 PM CST

  • There have been several high-profile deals in regions of great geopolitical sensitivity in recent weeks that have been made by U.S. companies.
  • Chevron and its partner Eni are fast-tracking a major gas discovery in Egypt.
  • Chevron, along with most notably ConocoPhillips, has been at the vanguard of a broad-based resurgence in the successful re-engagement of the U.S. in several highly strategic regions across the wider Middle East.

After an extended period of reduced engagement in the Middle East and a refocusing inwards on itself, which allowed China and Russia to exploit the resultant power vacuum, there have been several signs recently that the U.S. has decided that now is a good time to take up where it left off a few years ago. In the energy sector, there have been several high-profile deals in regions of great geopolitical sensitivity in recent weeks that have been made by U.S. companies or companies of countries alongside the U.S. in its sphere of influence. The latest one is Chevron’s discovery of a potentially huge offshore gas field in Egypt that, according to comments last week, is due to be fast-tracked by Chevron and its partner in the site, Italy’s Eni.  

Chevron and Eni, which each hold a 45 percent stake in the 1,800 square kilometre (sq.km) Nargis offshore area concession (with Egypt’s Tharwa Petroleum Co. holding the remaining 10 percent stake), announced that they have made a new gas discovery in the concession, focused on the Nargis-1 well. The state-owned Egyptian Natural Gas Holding Company (EGAS) stated in the past few days that the precise quantity of reserves in the well were being evaluated but that it was working with Chevron, Eni and Tharwa to begin production as soon as possible. This should not take long as, according to data from marine intelligence firm VesselsValue, Eni has a platform in Thekah, around 40 kilometres to the south-west of the Nargis site. This discovery follows the announcement in December 2022 that Chevron had hit at least 3.5 trillion cubic feet of gas with its Nargis-1 exploration well in the eastern Nile Delta, about 60 kilometres north of the Sinai Peninsula. 

Related: U.S. Gasoline Prices Continue To Climb

Chevron, along with most notably ConocoPhillips, has been at the vanguard of a broad-based resurgence in the successful re-engagement of the U.S. in several highly strategic regions across the wider Middle East, including the Eastern Mediterranean. Chevron only entered the Egyptian upstream sector in 2020 but now operates the huge Leviathan and Tamar fields in Israel and the Aphrodite project offshore Cyprus. According to the president of Chevron International Exploration and Production, Clay Neff: “The East Mediterranean has abundant energy resources, and their development is driving strategic collaboration in the region.”

The previous strategic collaboration in the region worthy of note was concentrated around China, Russia, and Iran’s efforts to rope its key players – including Egypt – into their vision of how the area should be configured. A core strand of this strategy was centred on the creation of a ‘unified power grid’ – in every senses of the words – as analysed in depth in my last book on the global oil markets. Suffice it to say here that the idea runs along the same lines as the famous quote on how to maintain power from former U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt - that is: “If you’ve got them by the balls, their hearts and minds will follow.” In this context, if one country can shut off the ability of other countries’ citizens to cook, and to heat and light their houses and offices, then they will be highly receptive to any suggestions that the country might make. 

The attempt to concentrate the wider Middle East’s power grid has been going on for some time now, driven by China and Russia through the practical machinations of Iran. Last year saw an announcement that Egypt and Jordan were increasing their cooperation in gas delivery projects inside Jordan with Egyptian expertise through specialised petroleum sector companies. Just prior to this, it was announced that Iraq had agreed to re-start the export of crude oil from Iraq’s Kirkuk to the refinery at Zarqa in Jordan. Electricity supply originating from Iran was also factored into this deal, given that Iran has historically supplied Iraq with 30-40 percent of all its electricity needs, and had just signed the longest-ever single deal between it and Iraq to continue to do the same at that point. 

At around the same time, Iraq’s then-Electricity Minister, Majid Mahdi Hantoush, announced that plans had been finalised for the completion of Iraq’s electricity connection with Egypt within the next three years. This network was to be bolstered by the parallel network connections that Iran had consolidated in terms both of direct electricity and gas exchanges. These, said Iran’s then-Energy Minister, Reza Ardakanian in 2019, would be part of the overall project to establish a joint Arab electricity market. The establishing of broad and deep cooperation in oil, gas, and electricity was a key part of the wide-ranging ‘25-Year Comprehensive Cooperation Agreement’, first broken by me in an article published on 3 September 2019.

A near-term tactic for the U.S. to regain ground lost to the China-led bloc in recent years appears to be addressing the shortfall in, particularly, gas supplies left in many countries after sanctions were placed on Russian supplies following its invasion of Ukraine. ConocoPhillips played a crucial role in the recent liquefied natural gas (LNG) supply deal between Qatar and Germany, with Germany being seen by Washington as the most likely European country to renege on such sanctions. This would have been disastrous for any cohesive response from Europe as a whole in this context, given Germany’s effective position as leader of the European Union bloc.

In a similar vein, this gas discovery in Egypt not only drives a wedge between Egypt and the idea of a unified Middle East power grid beholden ultimately to China but also provides a new source of gas into Europe as and when required through the participation of European heavyweight oil and gas company, Eni. Eni itself has also been notable for its entrepreneurial and aggressive approach to finding and safeguarding new oil and gas supplies across the Middle East, as has France’s TotalEnergies, with the Italian firm looking at consolidating and expanding its presence recently in Libya and the UAE, among others. In the context of the latest Nargis discovery, Eni has said the Nargis-1 well find confirms the validity of its focus on Egypt offshore: “[…] which [we] will further develop thanks to the recent award of exploration blocks North Rafah, North El Fayrouz, North East El Arish, Tiba and Bellatrix-Seti East”. This all follows Eni’s discovery of the huge Zohr field in the East Mediterranean in 2015 and is in line with the company’s aim of completely replacing gas imports from Russia by 2025.

This very active re-engagement of the U.S. in highly strategically sensitive areas of the broader Middle East follows a period of considerable withdrawal from the region during the presidency of Donald Trump, as explained in his ‘Endless Wars’ commencement address to the United States Military Academy at West Point on 13 June 2020. His comment that the days of the U.S. being the ‘policeman of the world’ were over found resonance in the U.S. withdrawal from, most notably, Syria (in 2019) – including protracted internal White House discussions about withdrawing from the strategically vital At-Tanf exclusion zone that was the tri-border junction of Syria, Jordan, and Iraq - Afghanistan (2021), and Iraq (2021). 

The reason for this very active re-engagement right now from the U.S. appears to be that Russia, and by extension, China, have never been so weak in geopolitical terms in recent years as they are right now. This is a direct consequence of the omni-shambolic invasion by Russia of Ukraine that has significantly damaged the credibility of President Vladimir Putin as a shrewd geopolitical operator and of his country as a major military force. By extension, it has done the same for China’s President Xi Jinping and his country too. Xi knows this, as reflected in the quick 180-degree turn that his country did after Russia’s invasion, from the two countries enjoying a ‘no limits’ relationship to one that suddenly had a lot of limits indeed. 

According to sources in the European Union’s energy security apparatus spoken to exclusively by OilPrice.com last week. “If Putin had just waited five years to make his move in Europe then things would probably have been very different: Nordstream 2 would have made Europe firmly captive to Russian gas, Russian oil supplies would have cemented this dependence, and the highly-placed European leaders in various fields that Russia had been cultivating would have smoothed the way, but he [Putin] didn’t wait,” he said. Perhaps Putin did not wait because the rumours of his being terminally ill are true and he simply could not wait, but whatever the reason his actions in Ukraine have re-galvanised the U.S. and Europe and NATO, and left the door wide open internationally for that alliance to start rolling back some of the ground it lost to China and Russia in the previous few years.

By Simon Watkins for Oilprice.com

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On 1/18/2023 at 6:06 PM, notsonice said:

what a load of BS...

car loans in the US ? longest 7 years

 

now on to your total BS on batteries........(I hope you know the difference between lead-acid and lithium based batteries)

 

EV's don't last 10 years (at least the batteries don't)??? is just utter BS

 

the highlights of the following article

How Does EV Battery Longevity Compare to ICE Vehicles?

Both of the mandated warranty numbers (8 years, 100,000 miles) for EV batteries far exceed the average ICE vehicle drivetrain warranty of 5 years or 60,000 miles. The average lifetime mileage of an ICE vehicle is about 133,000 miles. While experts estimate the average EV battery will last around 200,000 miles, some manufacturers already promise much more than that. 

 

And the news gets better: Tesla has their sights set on a million-mile battery, and claims that they are not far from achieving this goal

 

 

EV Connect

How Long Does an Electric Car Battery Last?

Nov 8
Written By EV Connect

As electric cars and other electric vehicles (EVs) become more popular, many consumers hoping to make the switch want to know: How long does an EV battery last? While battery life span varies by manufacturer and age, in general you can expect new batteries to rival and often exceed the longevity of drivetrain components on internal combustion engine (ICE) Vehicles. 

EV Batteries: The Basics

Electric cars are powered by rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, which are more energy dense than the lead-acid batteries found in internal combustion engines or rechargeable nickel-cadmium batteries found in some hybrids. A lithium-ion battery’s high energy density means it produces more power for its size, making it ideal for an electric car.

 

Because EVs are powered by the battery alone, they are far more simple and efficient than ICE vehicles. As lithium-ion batteries have decreased in cost by 97% over the last 30 years, experts believe that EVs will soon be as cheap to produce as ICE vehicles. 

 

How Do EV Batteries Degrade?

EV batteries typically degrade due to temperature, cycles and time. Storage and operating temperatures have a huge impact on EV battery longevity; in general, warmer climates negatively affect the lifespan of an EV battery. As the battery goes through charge cycles — discharged while driving and charged back up while plugged in — it slowly loses maximum potential. However, simply not using or charging your EV battery does not mean it will last forever: Calendar degradation is the battery losing life over time.

 

Unlike the lithium-ion batteries found in a phone or laptop, EV batteries utilize complex battery management systems (BMS) that regulate how the batteries are charged and discharged to prolong their life. That means your EV battery is most likely to experience temperature or calendar degradation.

 

How Long Does an Electric Car Battery Last?

So the question remains: How long can you expect your EV battery to last? Fortunately for consumers, the government mandates EV manufacturers to warranty batteries for 8 years or 100,000 miles, while California extends that warranty to 10 years or 150,000 miles.

 

As EV battery packs become cheaper to manufacture, companies can create larger batteries with more energy potential, which in turn increases their mile-range. Additionally, the improved technology reduces the degradation of batteries, meaning that over time the maximum potential stays closer to the new battery. And because newer batteries already have greatly increased in mileage range, as they degrade they will still maintain a longer mileage range than batteries from just a few years ago. Finally, because lithium-ion batteries are made up of many individual cells, you rarely need to replace the entire battery as it degrades. Instead, you can save money by simply replacing dead cells. 

 

How Does EV Battery Longevity Compare to ICE Vehicles?

Both of the mandated warranty numbers (8 years, 100,000 miles) for EV batteries far exceed the average ICE vehicle drivetrain warranty of 5 years or 60,000 miles. The average lifetime mileage of an ICE vehicle is about 133,000 miles. While experts estimate the average EV battery will last around 200,000 miles, some manufacturers already promise much more than that. 

 

And the news gets better: Tesla has their sights set on a million-mile battery, and claims that they are not far from achieving this goal. On average, EV batteries only degrade at a rate of 2.3% of maximum capacity per year, so with proper care you can reliably expect your EV battery to last as long or longer than ICE drivetrain components. 

 

How To Extend EV Battery Life

While EV batteries are already durable, there are specific actions owners can take to further maximize battery lifespan.

 

Follow EV Manufacturer Guidelines

First, it is important to follow your EV’s specific guidelines for optimal battery performance, as well as keep your vehicle’s software up to date. Because each EV manufacturer utilizes different battery chemistries and cooling technologies, each will have its own set of optimal operating and charging instructions.

 

Maintain Moderate Temperatures

EVs with liquid-cooled batteries see better battery life retention because they maintain lower operating temperatures. In general, storing and operating your EV in moderate climates is an effective way to extend battery life. Even if you live in a warmer climate, parking your vehicle in a garage or well-shaded area helps, as a vehicle spends most of its life parked. 

 

Minimize Rapid Charging

While occasionally utilizing direct current rapid charging (DCRC) to power your vehicle is okay, if you can minimize the frequency of this charging method, you are likely to see less battery degradation later in its life. Luckily, EV Connect offers a variety of charging stations to ensure a number of efficient solutions for your vehicle. And remember: Don’t be afraid to use your EV, as frequent use is not a major factor in battery degradation. 

 

An EV Battery’s Second Life

One of the most exciting aspects of EV battery degradation for eco-conscious consumers is the fact that batteries can still serve a sustainable purpose after they leave your EV. Even as they lose efficiency to power a car (usually at 70% of their maximum charge potential), these powerful EV batteries retain enough life to pair with solar and can serve as secondary energy for your home. Some manufacturers even collect or buy back used batteries to sustainably power other projects, such as sports arenas. You can feel secure in knowing that the sustainability of your EV’s power continues long after it leaves your vehicle. 

 

EV batteries continue to decrease in cost, travel more miles on a charge and retain longer life spans. Experts already suggest that EV batteries will exceed the longevity of ICE components, and the technology improves every year. It’s all good news: Your EV battery will serve your needs for years to come, and it can even be sustainably recycled after its life from powering your vehicle.

 

Interested in EV charging stations? Connect with us today.

 

 

 

If this were true, there would be a market for used EVs, which there is not. No one wants to buy a used battery.

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