HELLO MIDTERMS!

Biting my nails here on midterm day! 

Watching:

  • Colorado ballot initiative 97
  • California ballot proposition 6
  • Washington State Carbon tax Initiative 1631
  • North Dakota Senator Heitkamp v Cramer
  • Florida Senator Nelson v Scott
  • Texas Senator Cruz v O'Rourke
  • Nevada governor
  • New Hampshire governor
  • Maine governor
  • Colorado governor
  • California governor

Big Oil has spent a lot of money in some of these races, so stay tuned!

Which races are you watching?

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Hi Rodent!  Where have you been?

The only race I'm watching is the final count in both the House and the Senate, and the effect that may have on the markets. 

Funny (to me only?) is how both sides of the political spectrum seem to be in agreement: If the Republicans (Trump's side, for those who may not know) win, the markets should go up.  If Democrats win, the markets should go down.

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16 minutes ago, Dan Warnick said:

Hi Rodent!  Where have you been?

The only race I'm watching is the final count in both the House and the Senate, and the effect that may have on the markets. 

Funny (to me only?) is how both sides of the political spectrum seem to be in agreement: If the Republicans (Trump's side, for those who may not know) win, the markets should go up.  If Democrats win, the markets should go down.

Howdy! While the rebalancing of the House/Senate has the most power to swing the overall markets, as far as oil is concerned specifically, many of the ballot initiatives and governor's races will have a future impact on energy. If you look at where Big Oil is spending its money, you will see what Big Oil fears could impact it the most.They're not spending millions to quash some of these initiatives if they aren't convinced it will have an impact on them.

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I'm with Dan,,, the race for congress is the interesting stuff.  I for one will be glad for tomorrow.  The whole country feels like it's in limbo waiting for this election, and I need to move on.  I actually did my best already,,, voted absentee last week, and patiently waiting.  And hoping it goes the way I want.

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Americans, please vote.

It's your hard-won right and duty to vote.

This is most definitely not an election to sit out.

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WWG1WGA

 

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28 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Americans, please vote.

It's your hard-won right and duty to vote.

This is most definitely not an election to sit out.

60238b055922636f13d2867131429374d26575fc7540ec36f2a6398d0e5d388c.thumb.jpg.27cbc0d8228415fe9d1fd08a232ed1de.jpg

WWG1WGA

 

hear, here!! Your civic duty!

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UK news breaks it down from a bit more of a remote view than U.S. news:

US midterm results and exit polls: When will we know the election outcome and what are the states to watch?

The midterm elections today mark two years since Donald Trump was elected President, and its results will be a barometer of how the people of the US think he is faring. In recent weeks birthright citizenship, the migrant caravan and the mail bomber have overshadowed debates and may spell trouble for the Republican party.

The midterm elections, which involve a combination of elections for the US Congress, governorships and local races, take place every two years.

Republicans currently control the House of Representatives and the Senate – the two chambers which make up the US Congress. But pundits are suggesting the Democrats might take control.

With all 435 seats in the House of Representatives and 35 out of the Senate’s 100 seats up for election, as well as 36 state governors, there are a lot of races to keep an eye on. 

And with Trump's approval rating hovering around 40 per cent, a lot could change. Here is our guide on the states to watch – and when we can expect to see results from them.

When does voting start and end?

People will take to the polls across the 50 states from 1pm GMT today, with polls closing from midnight GMT onwards. Below are the last polling times for each state.

19:00 EST (midnight GMT): Georgia, Indiana, Kentucky, New Hampshire, South Carolina, Vermont, Virginia

19:30 EST (00:30 GMT): North Carolina, Ohio, West Virginia

20:00 EST (01:00 GMT): Alabama, Conneticut, Delaware, Florida, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Massacheutts, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee

20:30 EST (01:30 GMT): Arkansas

21:00 EST (02:00 GMT): Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Nebraska, New Mexico, New York, South Dakota, Texas, Wisconsin, Wyoming

22:00 EST (03:00 GMT): Iowa, Montana, Nevada, Utah

23:00 EST (04:00 GMT): California, Hawaii, Idaho, North Dakota, Oregon, Washington

01:00 EST (06:00 GMT): Alaska

When will we know the results and will there be an exit poll?

The votes will start to be counted as soon as the each polling station closes, which means results will trickle in over the early hours of the morning. We can expect a clear picture on what the elections mean for the country by 8am tomorrow (Wednesday 7th November) GMT, however it's likely that an exit poll (or numerous ones as they may be state by state) will be available shortly after voting closes.

Which are the seats to watch for the House of Representatives?

The number of seats each US state receives depends on its population size. California, the most populous state, has 53 representatives while seven states - Alaska, Delaware, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota, Vermont and Wyoming have just one representative.

The Republican Party currently controls the chamber with a 43-seat majority, but it is widely expected that the Democrats will gain control in the upcoming election. The current House has 236 Republicans and 193 Democrats, with six vacant seats. 

The Democrats need a net gain of 24 seats to win a majority, which is no small accomplishment, but the president's low approval ratings have given the party reason to hope. 

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Governor races will be important too, gerrymandering in favor of the in Democrats in 2020

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