Bio-fuels in shipping

@Tom Kirkman@Jan van Eck @mthebold 

Any thoughts on this? 

I have stumbled over several news this week that makes me question how close we are to a technological tipping point? For clarity - I of course do not believe that this will displace O&G anytime soon, but I may need to re-evaluate my "time-line". Again, reason for my interest is composition of my pension investments. 

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52 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

@Guillaume Albasini

What is your take on this? 

The physical availability of WVO limits its use. 

I recall reading somewhere that the USA produces approx 1.2 mt of WVO.

If you assume crude WVO is roughly the equivalent of crude oil then it equals to approx 29000 barrels per day

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1 hour ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

@Tom Kirkman@Jan van Eck @mthebold 

Any thoughts on this? 

I have stumbled over several news this week that makes me question how close we are to a technological tipping point? For clarity - I of course do not believe that this will displace O&G anytime soon, but I may need to re-evaluate my "time-line". Again, reason for my interest is composition of my pension investments. 

I  would not go betting your pension on this deal.  The formulation of vegetable oils into a diesel substitute is done on a commercial scale only in a university setting.  Yale University had a campus shuttle bus, running with I recall a 6-liter diesel, on waste cooking oils from the dining room kitchens, which were reformulated in a little boiler operation inside the power station.  The oil worked just fine in the bus, except when the weather gets cold, then there are these problems of the stuff gelling up in the tank and the fuel lines. So the University could not run the bus in the Winter. Had a bit of a smell of French Fries  ("chips" to you Continentals)  wafting around out of the tailpipe.  Pleasant enough, but guaranteed to make you hungry.  I think the real problem is that of volume.  There is just not enough of that cooking oil waste go go around, and fuelling a fleet of bulk carriers strikes me as ambitious. 

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A friend went to work for his father in-law that had a company that cracked used cooking oil to use as a fuel. It went well until the big boys got in on the game and they couldn't compete. That was over ten years ago in the UK.

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8 hours ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

@Guillaume Albasini

What is your take on this? 

This project seems to be related to a more wide initiative, the Sustainable Marine Biofuel Initiative, started in 2015 by GoodFuels Marine, Wärtsilä and shipowner Boskalis. This is a development programme for next-generation ‘drop in’ bio marine fuels that are ready-made replacements for fossil fuels, but are sustainable and have the potential to be scalable and affordable over the longer term. Over a period of two years, the consortium has been testing several next-generation biofuels at the Wärtsilä test facilities in Vaasa (Finland), a process that is followed by live testing on various ships within the Boskalis global fleet across different regions and ports.

The consortium has been initially focusing on drop-in biofuels suited to be blended with existing marine fuels. They have also tested a sustainable wood-based drop-in biofuel called UPM BioVerno, supplied by Finnish UPM Biofuels, the first-ever biofuel derived from wood residue to be used in a marine fleet.

https://www.mpropulsion.com/news/view,biofuel-pioneer-makes-headway_49396.htm

http://www.ppmc-transport.org/sustainable-marine-biofuel-initiative/

https://ec.europa.eu/energy/sites/ener/files/documents/14_isabel_welten.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3ZNIutKY1M
 

And you can also watch this 20 minutes interesting presentation of Dirk Kronemeijer, CEO at GoodFuels :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_gph5fNGso

 

The chart below from a GoodFuels powerpoint shows the interesting aspect of biofuels : They have low CO2 emissions AND low SOx emissions.

image.thumb.png.6c479ed5285963542514c7696f0c099f.png

Other options like (Bio)LNG have are also tested.

On BioLNG : http://european-biogas.eu/wp-content/uploads/files/2013/11/13-Sofie-Van-Volsem-Evaluating-the-Potential-of-bio-LNG-in-Marine-Transportation.pdf

https://www.thormarinetrading.com/news-posts/bio-lng-overtake-traditional-lng/

 

I don't think biofuels will fully replace fossil fuels in marine transportation but they can take a share of the market . As a stand alone fuel or blended with marine gas oil (MGO) or marine diesel oil (MDO) they can help lowering the CO2 and SOx emissions to comply with the IMO 2020 regulations. Technological transitions are always offering opportunities for innovation and it's interesting to follow the recent developments in marine fuels.

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https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/8396085/How-to-run-a-car-on-cooking-oil-at-18p-a-litre.html

https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=564408

Not really something new the articles above show people using it back in 2007 and 2011 in UK. Blending it with diesel seems to be the way forward. 90% veg oil to 10% diesel is quoted by one user.

If you cant be bothered to do it yourself its onsale on ebay along with all the bits if you want to do it from scratch.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=vegetable+oil+as+diesel+fuel&ul_noapp=true

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On 12/2/2018 at 2:43 PM, jaycee said:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/8396085/How-to-run-a-car-on-cooking-oil-at-18p-a-litre.html

https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=564408

Not really something new the articles above show people using it back in 2007 and 2011 in UK. Blending it with diesel seems to be the way forward. 90% veg oil to 10% diesel is quoted by one user.

If you cant be bothered to do it yourself its onsale on ebay along with all the bits if you want to do it from scratch.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=vegetable+oil+as+diesel+fuel&ul_noapp=true

Back in the day You converted it to biodiesel (and glycerol) with Methanol 

Most of those WVO garage refiners are blind now😄

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On 12/2/2018 at 2:14 AM, Guillaume Albasini said:

This project seems to be related to a more wide initiative, the Sustainable Marine Biofuel Initiative, started in 2015 by GoodFuels Marine, Wärtsilä and shipowner Boskalis. This is a development programme for next-generation ‘drop in’ bio marine fuels that are ready-made replacements for fossil fuels, but are sustainable and have the potential to be scalable and affordable over the longer term. Over a period of two years, the consortium has been testing several next-generation biofuels at the Wärtsilä test facilities in Vaasa (Finland), a process that is followed by live testing on various ships within the Boskalis global fleet across different regions and ports.

The consortium has been initially focusing on drop-in biofuels suited to be blended with existing marine fuels. They have also tested a sustainable wood-based drop-in biofuel called UPM BioVerno, supplied by Finnish UPM Biofuels, the first-ever biofuel derived from wood residue to be used in a marine fleet.

https://www.mpropulsion.com/news/view,biofuel-pioneer-makes-headway_49396.htm

http://www.ppmc-transport.org/sustainable-marine-biofuel-initiative/

https://ec.europa.eu/energy/sites/ener/files/documents/14_isabel_welten.pdf

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W3ZNIutKY1M
 

And you can also watch this 20 minutes interesting presentation of Dirk Kronemeijer, CEO at GoodFuels :

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y_gph5fNGso

 

The chart below from a GoodFuels powerpoint shows the interesting aspect of biofuels : They have low CO2 emissions AND low SOx emissions.

image.thumb.png.6c479ed5285963542514c7696f0c099f.png

Other options like (Bio)LNG have are also tested.

On BioLNG : http://european-biogas.eu/wp-content/uploads/files/2013/11/13-Sofie-Van-Volsem-Evaluating-the-Potential-of-bio-LNG-in-Marine-Transportation.pdf

https://www.thormarinetrading.com/news-posts/bio-lng-overtake-traditional-lng/

 

I don't think biofuels will fully replace fossil fuels in marine transportation but they can take a share of the market . As a stand alone fuel or blended with marine gas oil (MGO) or marine diesel oil (MDO) they can help lowering the CO2 and SOx emissions to comply with the IMO 2020 regulations. Technological transitions are always offering opportunities for innovation and it's interesting to follow the recent developments in marine fuels.

Thanks Guillame, 

Actually, the fuel was supplied from goodfuel. 

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On 12/2/2018 at 3:43 PM, jaycee said:

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/8396085/How-to-run-a-car-on-cooking-oil-at-18p-a-litre.html

https://forums.moneysavingexpert.com/showthread.php?t=564408

Not really something new the articles above show people using it back in 2007 and 2011 in UK. Blending it with diesel seems to be the way forward. 90% veg oil to 10% diesel is quoted by one user.

If you cant be bothered to do it yourself its onsale on ebay along with all the bits if you want to do it from scratch.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/sch/i.html?_nkw=vegetable+oil+as+diesel+fuel&ul_noapp=true

I actually remember reading about the UK trials, but what awaken my interest was the commercially viable as more than a PR stunt. 

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