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Norway's Electric Cars Zip To New Record: Almost A Third Of All Sales

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Almost a third of new cars sold in Norway last year were pure electric, a new world record as the country strives to end sales of fossil-fueled vehicles by 2025.In a bid to cut carbon emissions and air pollution, Norway exempts battery-driven cars from most taxes and offers benefits such as free parking and charging points to hasten a shift from diesel and petrol engines. The independent Norwegian Road Federation (NRF) said on Wednesday that electric cars rose to 31.2 percent of all sales last year, from 20.8 percent in 2017 and just 5.5 percent in 2013, while sales of petrol and diesel cars plunged. “It was a small step closer to the 2025 goal,” by which time Norway’s parliament wants all new cars to be emissions-free, Oeyvind Solberg Thorsen, head of the NRF, told a conference.Still, he cautioned that there was a long way to go since two-thirds of almost 148,000 cars sold in 2018 in Norway were powered by fossil fuel or were hybrids, which have both battery power and an internal combustion engine. Sales of pure electric cars surged 40 percent to 46,092 in 2018 while sales of diesel models fell 28 percent, petrol cars were down 17 percent and hybrids that cannot be plugged in fell 20 percent.

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Another win for Norway.  But, they only have 5.3 million residents. I support their efforts.Taxes are a delayed payment for services ie: education and heath care.

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Yep. It's feasible in a small country! Indeed, small and very successful country with the best conditions for life in the world

 

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Norway is genius, selling the oil to the world whilst using clean energy at home! Very clever and forward thinking people!

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They do things for sustainability....The silent boom - Norway's electric car revolution..... 

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Sounds incredible: “To help sales, the Norwegian government waived hefty vehicle import duties, registration, sales taxes for buyers of electric cars. Owners don't have to pay road tolls, and get free use of ferries and bus lanes in congested city centers.”

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That is a pretty incredible deal.  

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That is the beauty of Scandinavian countries. Governments are working for their citizens and helping them in any occasion.. Enough benefits for all

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LETTER

Norway’s Energy Paradox

June 21, 2017
  • In Oslo, a driving-school owner charging an electric Nissan Leaf, which is used in the school’s lessons.CreditThomas Haugersveen for The New York Times
00norwayclimate1-articleLarge.jpg?qualit
CreditCreditThomas Haugersveen for The New York Times

To the Editor:

Re “Oil Producer. Climate Ally. Norway Is a Paradox” (news article, June 18):

There is no easy answer to this. The world needs more energy and less carbon: less coal, more efficient use of oil and gas and more renewables. Energy transformation will take time. Statoil, the biggest energy company in Norway, provides millions with energy daily, reliably and responsibly.

We produce oil and gas with 50 percent less emissions than the world average. If we stop, others will deliver. When discussing climate, an international perspective is needed. Indeed, carbon dioxide emissions in Britain are at a 120-year low. Why? Natural gas, much of it delivered through pipelines from Norway, and renewables have replaced coal.

To meet demand, exploration for oil and gas within rigorous environmental regulations is still needed. But we will also quadruple investments in renewables, including offshore wind outside New York.

The Paris agreement, which we support, is about reducing one’s own emissions and to contribute globally with actions and policies. That is how we balance the paradox.

 

BJORN OTTO SVERDRUP
OSLO

The writer is senior vice president for corporate sustainability, Statoil.

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