Australia Needs Urgent LNG Imports

"It said that its modeling shows gas production in the states of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania will start falling short of demand by 2022, and that by 2025, annual gas production offshore Victoria will more than halve from current levels, dropping to 146 PJ from 336 PJ in 2018."

Here. So solar and wind are not growing fast enough, then?

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5 hours ago, Marina Schwarz said:

"It said that its modeling shows gas production in the states of New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania will start falling short of demand by 2022, and that by 2025, annual gas production offshore Victoria will more than halve from current levels, dropping to 146 PJ from 336 PJ in 2018."

Here. So solar and wind are not growing fast enough, then?

This was seen coming in 2012 (I'm a dual Citizen). I'm amazed that a proportion of the Coal Seam Gas in Queensland  was not designated for Australian usage with some additional support for pipelines down the east coast

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Maybe there's still time to rectify the matter. Or are there people in authority questioning the accuracy of such forecasts? Me, I'd rather err on the side of caution.

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5 minutes ago, Marina Schwarz said:

Maybe there's still time to rectify the matter. Or are there people in authority questioning the accuracy of such forecasts? Me, I'd rather err on the side of caution.

It's a slow-moving trainwreck that has been known about for years, as NickW pointed out above.  I remember writing about this a few years ago on the old Oilpro forum.

Wind and Solar seem unlikely to fill the gap, as Oz merrily exports its hydrocarbons to Asia.

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Why they are not doing anything about it is beyond me, then. Does anyone think the problem will solve itself somehow?

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(edited)

2 hours ago, Marina Schwarz said:

Why they are not doing anything about it is beyond me, then. Does anyone think the problem will solve itself somehow?

I do :)   I've also got some prime Australian real estate I think you'd all be interested in.  Just drop me a line.  (Sarcasm)

Edited by Dan Warnick
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1 minute ago, digba said:

how can i inveset here?

I will refer you to some admins.  Perhaps they can help to guide you as to what you can get from this site:

@CMOP @Rodent @Tom Kirkman

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Due to PMs that "digba" was sending me, I have blocked him/her.

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1 hour ago, Dan Warnick said:

I do :)   I've also got some prime Australian real estate I think you'd all be interested in.  Just drop me a line.  (Sarcasm)

Well that is Australia's economic vision. Everyone to own 3 'investment' properties each is a sure fire winner. What could possibly go wrong?

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The temptation is huge, I admit. If only it wasn't so far...

Anyway, I see Queensland has approved a natural gas project, so maybe someone is doing something.

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22 minutes ago, Marina Schwarz said:

The temptation is huge, I admit. If only it wasn't so far...

Anyway, I see Queensland has approved a natural gas project, so maybe someone is doing something.

Still need the pipeline capacity to get that down to Sydney and Melbourne

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Ah, pipelines. Right.

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On 2/28/2019 at 2:54 AM, NickW said:

Still need the pipeline capacity to get that down to Sydney and Melbourne

The big question lurking in my mind is whether the cause for the inaction is Greenie desire for eliminating "fossil fuels".

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Apparently the concepts of 'Planning Ahead' and 'Lessons Learned' are not fully grasped Down Under.

https://www.oilandgas360.com/worlds-second-largest-lng-exporter-considers-lng-imports/

Based on the five proposals to date, Australia now appears to be planning to overbuild LNG import capacity in response to an overbuild of LNG export capacity,

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Mind-boggling.

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On 2/28/2019 at 6:46 PM, Dan Warnick said:

I do :)   I've also got some prime Australian real estate I think you'd all be interested in.  Just drop me a line.  (Sarcasm)

selling Sydney bridge, mate? :)

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On 2/28/2019 at 8:54 PM, NickW said:

Still need the pipeline capacity to get that down to Sydney and Melbourne

yeap. Here is pipeline situation and gas balances: https://www.aemo.com.au/Gas/Gas-Bulletin-Board

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On 3/3/2019 at 4:51 AM, ronwagn said:

The big question lurking in my mind is whether the cause for the inaction is Greenie desire for eliminating "fossil fuels".

More likely vested interests in the Coal sector.

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On 3/3/2019 at 2:51 PM, ronwagn said:

The big question lurking in my mind is whether the cause for the inaction is Greenie desire for eliminating "fossil fuels".

definitely a big factor. AGL decided to pretty much exit their upstream business after highly organized opposition to Gloucester Coal Seam Gas development in NSW (also coincided with CEO change; he is gone now so hopefully company can go back to its origins of "Australia Gas Lighting"). Inner-city hypocrites in Sydney and Melbourne are dead against any new development but crying loud for gas reservation policy to move gas from Queensland. Moronic government reacts and enacts law which allow them to stop exports - leaving LNG buyers in Japan, Korea and China gasping for air. So much for "stable jurisdiction"...

Push for 50% renewable generation target also not helping to lower gas prices. A lot more gas will be required to stabilize the grid when %% of intermittent power increases. South Australia is already at ~50% and doing it with gas and diesel generators; blackouts and brownouts still occur.

Listened to formal Resources and Energy Minister Ian Macfarlane yesterday - says "Energy policy in Australia is about power, not electricity..." 

Never boring down under, despite ban on weapons Aussies finding innovative ways to shoot themselves in both feet.

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2 hours ago, NickW said:

More likely vested interests in the Coal sector.

Why would Greenies be against coal seam gas? Aren't they worried about natural leaks?

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3 hours ago, ronwagn said:

Why would Greenies be against coal seam gas? Aren't they worried about natural leaks?

green morons blame it all on "fracking" and set on fire for publicity stunt https://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-04-23/condamine-river-bubbling-methane-gas-set-alight-greens-mp/7352578

Coal Seam Gas is often seep to surface (may as well produce it...) and naturally occurring, as per CSIRO.

Gas observed in water bores while back:

image.png.5738dfcd8ba4242f52db56491e6d0a53.png

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10 hours ago, DanilKa said:

selling Sydney bridge, mate? :)

Special price, just for you if you act now!

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13 hours ago, ronwagn said:

Why would Greenies be against coal seam gas? Aren't they worried about natural leaks?

I think its more conventional coal exploitation.

Environmental opposition to coal mining and in particular in-situ coal gasification has been more widespread than opposition to coal seam gas developments.

 

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11 hours ago, NickW said:

I think its more conventional coal exploitation.

Environmental opposition to coal mining and in particular in-situ coal gasification has been more widespread than opposition to coal seam gas developments.

 

I am not informed about coal gasification related pollution. It sounds like something to use after other options though.

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