Solar Industry Lays Claim To The 2020s; Kicks Off The Solar+ Decade

Lets see what the future holds!!! They should drop the term "clean energy"...

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Solar Industry Lays Claim To The 2020s; Kicks Off The Solar+ Decade

As this decade nears a close, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has designated the next decade The Solar+ Decade.

Constituting 2.5% of the nation’s electricity generation on May 16, solar will account for 20% of all electricity generation by 2030, under SEIA’s aggressive target. To chart the industry’s course, SEIA is producing a roadmap to the Solar+ Decade that will lay out the policy, social, environmental and economic elements that will need to be in place to make solar the leading source of new power generation in the 2020s.

Over the next 10 years, the Solar+ Decade will be about collaboration and building the partnerships and expertise needed to overcome systemic challenges preventing the widescale adoption of solar. To achieve this goal, solar, wind and storage must work together to transform a complex and interrelated world of markets, customers and electricity systems.

“It is incumbent upon us to create a shared clean energy vision,” said Abigail Ross Hopper, SEIA’s president and CEO.  “It won’t be just the Solar Decade, but the Solar+ Decade where Solar + Storage, Solar + Grid Modernization, Solar + Wind, and Solar+ Overwhelming Public Support combine to define our nation’s clean energy future,” she said. 

To meaningfully address climate change and expand the benefits that low-priced clean energy brings to the economy, solar must account for a much larger share of U.S. electricity. Increasing solar generation from 2.5% today to 20% by 2030 could add more than $345 billion into the U.S. economy and grow the workforce to 600,000 solar professionals, from nearly 250,000 today.

“The goal is bold but achievable,” Hopper said. “If we hit 20% solar by 2030, we will prove that solving the climate challenge won’t hurt the economy, but instead will be one of the greatest economic growth opportunities in decades,” she said.

Indeed, this effort isn’t without its challenges. To get there, the industry must reach an average annual growth rate of 18% and cost reductions across all market segments by nearly 50%. The industry will need to install an average of 39 gigawatts (GW) each year throughout the 2020s, including 77 GW in 2030 alone.

On May 15, Ms. Hopper testified before the House Science, Space, and Transportation Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy where she outlined the technical and market challenges the industry needs to overcome. These challenges and priority research areas include:

  • Growing a more diverse workforce which will require federal job training.
  • Cutting soft costs and streamlining permitting and interconnection processes.
  • Prioritizing the security and resilience of the grid by easing grid integration and creating cyber secure technologies.
  • Supporting advanced manufacturing and later stage demonstration and deployment projects that enable the scale up of energy storage.

“The 2020s will be the decade where we take action and work with our partners to solve our most pressing climate problems,” said Hopper said. “The stakes have never been higher as we take our first steps into the Solar+ Decade.”


Indeed, this effort isn’t without its challenges. To get there, the industry must reach an average annual growth rate of 18% and cost reductions across all market segments by nearly 50%. The industry will need to install an average of 39 gigawatts (GW) each year throughout the 2020s, including 77 GW in 2030 alone.

On May 15, Ms. Hopper testified before the House Science, Space, and Transportation Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy where she outlined the technical and market challenges the industry needs to overcome. These challenges and priority research areas include:

  • Growing a more diverse workforce which will require federal job training.
  • Cutting soft costs and streamlining permitting and interconnection processes.
  • Prioritizing the security and resilience of the grid by easing grid integration and creating cyber secure technologies.
  • Supporting advanced manufacturing and later stage demonstration and deployment projects that enable the scale up of energy storage.

“The 2020s will be the decade where we take action and work with our partners to solve our most pressing climate problems,” said Hopper said. “The stakes have never been higher as we take our first steps into the Solar+ Decade.”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, ceo_energemsier said:

As this decade nears a close, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has designated the next decade The Solar+ Decade.

Constituting 2.5% of the nation’s electricity generation on May 16, solar will account for 20% of all electricity generation by 2030, under SEIA’s aggressive target.

2.5 per cent of electricity generation? Like almost everything written in this area the article is not clear about what it covers.. are they including PV panels and solar generating plants - those mirror and tower installations and related generators? The article doesn't seem to be talking about wind power and, typically, the writer doesn't give any examples of what on earth he/she is talking about. Just requote the statement, add some stuff about how wonderful it all is and that's the article.. if they are talking about solar-towers and related technologies then good luck with getting to 5 per cent in 10 years let alone 20. There are, as far as I know, a handful of  solar tower projects rated at 100MW plus in the US but no real acceleration in the numbers being built and they are confined to certain areas (deserts). Also, only a few, maybe just one although I haven't looked for a while - use molten salt which allows them to operate 24 hours, sometimes.. All in all the statement is real hopeful..  

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, ceo_energemsier said:

"The 2020s will be the decade where we take action and work with our partners to solve our most pressing climate problems,” said Hopper said. “The stakes have never been higher as we take our first steps into the Solar+ Decade.”

Can't remember why I originally made this meme, or why the heck I chose an armadillo, but my sentiment seems to fit here.

 

2zm9bn.jpg

  • Haha 3
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Can't remember why I originally made this meme, or why the heck I chose an armadillo, but my sentiment seems to fit here.

 

2zm9bn.jpg

I read the article and I found it amusing in a funny way LOL

Lets go into the "Solar decade with a Polar Vortex" and see how folks make out !!!!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

20 hours ago, ceo_energemsier said:

Lets see what the future holds!!! They should drop the term "clean energy"...

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Solar Industry Lays Claim To The 2020s; Kicks Off The Solar+ Decade

As this decade nears a close, the Solar Energy Industries Association (SEIA) has designated the next decade The Solar+ Decade.

Constituting 2.5% of the nation’s electricity generation on May 16, solar will account for 20% of all electricity generation by 2030, under SEIA’s aggressive target. To chart the industry’s course, SEIA is producing a roadmap to the Solar+ Decade that will lay out the policy, social, environmental and economic elements that will need to be in place to make solar the leading source of new power generation in the 2020s.

Over the next 10 years, the Solar+ Decade will be about collaboration and building the partnerships and expertise needed to overcome systemic challenges preventing the widescale adoption of solar. To achieve this goal, solar, wind and storage must work together to transform a complex and interrelated world of markets, customers and electricity systems.

“It is incumbent upon us to create a shared clean energy vision,” said Abigail Ross Hopper, SEIA’s president and CEO.  “It won’t be just the Solar Decade, but the Solar+ Decade where Solar + Storage, Solar + Grid Modernization, Solar + Wind, and Solar+ Overwhelming Public Support combine to define our nation’s clean energy future,” she said. 

To meaningfully address climate change and expand the benefits that low-priced clean energy brings to the economy, solar must account for a much larger share of U.S. electricity. Increasing solar generation from 2.5% today to 20% by 2030 could add more than $345 billion into the U.S. economy and grow the workforce to 600,000 solar professionals, from nearly 250,000 today.

“The goal is bold but achievable,” Hopper said. “If we hit 20% solar by 2030, we will prove that solving the climate challenge won’t hurt the economy, but instead will be one of the greatest economic growth opportunities in decades,” she said.

Indeed, this effort isn’t without its challenges. To get there, the industry must reach an average annual growth rate of 18% and cost reductions across all market segments by nearly 50%. The industry will need to install an average of 39 gigawatts (GW) each year throughout the 2020s, including 77 GW in 2030 alone.

On May 15, Ms. Hopper testified before the House Science, Space, and Transportation Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy where she outlined the technical and market challenges the industry needs to overcome. These challenges and priority research areas include:

  • Growing a more diverse workforce which will require federal job training.
  • Cutting soft costs and streamlining permitting and interconnection processes.
  • Prioritizing the security and resilience of the grid by easing grid integration and creating cyber secure technologies.
  • Supporting advanced manufacturing and later stage demonstration and deployment projects that enable the scale up of energy storage.

“The 2020s will be the decade where we take action and work with our partners to solve our most pressing climate problems,” said Hopper said. “The stakes have never been higher as we take our first steps into the Solar+ Decade.”


Indeed, this effort isn’t without its challenges. To get there, the industry must reach an average annual growth rate of 18% and cost reductions across all market segments by nearly 50%. The industry will need to install an average of 39 gigawatts (GW) each year throughout the 2020s, including 77 GW in 2030 alone.

On May 15, Ms. Hopper testified before the House Science, Space, and Transportation Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy where she outlined the technical and market challenges the industry needs to overcome. These challenges and priority research areas include:

  • Growing a more diverse workforce which will require federal job training.
  • Cutting soft costs and streamlining permitting and interconnection processes.
  • Prioritizing the security and resilience of the grid by easing grid integration and creating cyber secure technologies.
  • Supporting advanced manufacturing and later stage demonstration and deployment projects that enable the scale up of energy storage.

“The 2020s will be the decade where we take action and work with our partners to solve our most pressing climate problems,” said Hopper said. “The stakes have never been higher as we take our first steps into the Solar+ Decade.”

I believe I read something about worldwide solar installations flatlining from 2017 to 2018.  It seems all that growth relied on government incentives, and governments are losing their taste for expensive energy.  More importantly, solar is still a tiny fraction of total electricity production, which means it's still picking choice locations and hasn't run into grid issues.  It would take remarkable technological developments for solar to maintain its pace as all these factors align against it.  I'm not convinced that's going to happen. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, BenFranklin'sSpectacles said:

I believe I read something about worldwide solar installations flatlining from 2017 to 2018.  It seems all that growth relied on government incentives, and governments are losing their taste for expensive energy.  More importantly, solar is still a tiny fraction of total electricity production, which means it's still picking choice locations and hasn't run into grid issues.  It would take remarkable technological developments for solar to maintain its pace as all these factors align against it.  I'm not convinced that's going to happen. 

Let's just say I'm "sceptical" too ;)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, BenFranklin'sSpectacles said:

Huh.  I stand corrected - and I learned something.  Thanks. 

It's the British spelling vs. American spelling.  Since Malaysia is a former British colony, over here I sometimes tend toward British versions of spelling.

American And British Spelling Differences

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 5/17/2019 at 1:16 PM, BenFranklin'sSpectacles said:

and governments are losing their taste for expensive energy.

How ab out ordinary people?  My clothes dryer now costs me $7.50  (U.S.) an hour to run.  Getting pricey!

Then again, look on the bright side: likely be fifteen dollars an hour over in Germany, with their Energiewende.  Just brilliant.

Never underestimate the ability of politicians to run your bills up.  Those guys have special talents in that department.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Jan van Eck said:

How ab out ordinary people?  My clothes dryer now costs me $7.50  (U.S.) an hour to run.  Getting pricey!

Then again, look on the bright side: likely be fifteen dollars an hour over in Germany, with their Energiewende.  Just brilliant.

Never underestimate the ability of politicians to run your bills up.  Those guys have special talents in that department.

Then they go "exempt" themselves from all the new taxes and costs!

Energiewende left a lot of people freezing and getting overheated! what a fiasco!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

32 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

It's the British spelling vs. American spelling.  Since Malaysia is a former British colony, over here I sometimes tend toward British versions of spelling.

American And British Spelling Differences

Colour, color, Favor , flavour......................... center, centre .....................

I lived in Europe growing up and went to school in Suisse and the UK and Australia and other parts of the world, in college my American professors who correct my assignments with American English spellings!!!

Some even would deduct points for it. So every now and then you may see some of my comments shift in the spellings back and forth.......

sulphur-sulfur, airplane, aeroplane.................. aluminum., aluminium...

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

34 minutes ago, Jan van Eck said:

How ab out ordinary people?  My clothes dryer now costs me $7.50  (U.S.) an hour to run.  Getting pricey!

Then again, look on the bright side: likely be fifteen dollars an hour over in Germany, with their Energiewende.  Just brilliant.

Never underestimate the ability of politicians to run your bills up.  Those guys have special talents in that department.

I was assuming that the limit on political greed is The People's willingness to tolerate it.  Ergo, when enough people get sick of something, the politicians follow suit. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites