EPA to push unified national fuel emissions standard

The EPA is currently considering whether it plans to implement changes to the current federal fuel standards. It has said it will determine whether changes will be made by April. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt says he supports a unified national vehicle fuel standard, stoking state fears that the agency may do away with waivers allowing states to implement stronger standards. Some states, including California and Massachusetts, currently set higher fuel emission standards than the federal standard, as allowed under a waiver program determined by former President Obama. 

 

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What happened to States Rights?

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Just now, Joanna said:

What happened to States Rights?

states should not be able to dictate federal rules. 

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No problem. Adopt California's standards nationally and were all good.

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Well, to weaken California standards would require amending the Clean Air Act. It would be much easier and accomplish the single national standard goal if EPA brought the rest of the country up to California standards. 14  other states are already there.

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It would certainly mean cheaper gasoline if there was one national standard rather than letting states do what they want

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The GOP is all about state's rights until they are in control. 

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35 minutes ago, Stephen said:

The EPA is currently considering whether it plans to implement changes to the current federal fuel standards. It has said it will determine whether changes will be made by April. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt says he supports a unified national vehicle fuel standard, stoking state fears that the agency may do away with waivers allowing states to implement stronger standards. Some states, including California and Massachusetts, currently set higher fuel emission standards than the federal standard, as allowed under a waiver program determined by former President Obama. 

 

This is the same guy that fought against Medicaid expansion, because of states' rights.

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37 minutes ago, Stephen said:

The EPA is currently considering whether it plans to implement changes to the current federal fuel standards. It has said it will determine whether changes will be made by April. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt says he supports a unified national vehicle fuel standard, stoking state fears that the agency may do away with waivers allowing states to implement stronger standards. Some states, including California and Massachusetts, currently set higher fuel emission standards than the federal standard, as allowed under a waiver program determined by former President Obama. 

 

I disagree with the EPA chief on this one. If California, Massachusetts and other states  want stricter standards, how is anyone outside those states effected ?

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51 minutes ago, Stephen said:

The EPA is currently considering whether it plans to implement changes to the current federal fuel standards. It has said it will determine whether changes will be made by April. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt says he supports a unified national vehicle fuel standard, stoking state fears that the agency may do away with waivers allowing states to implement stronger standards. Some states, including California and Massachusetts, currently set higher fuel emission standards than the federal standard, as allowed under a waiver program determined by former President Obama. 

 

Why is Commiefornia upset? Didn't they pass a law to outlaw gas and diesel vehicles by 2030?

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I'm with the individual states on this one. States should be allowed to set their own standards. But I also agree with John.... what's the fuss if you're not going to have fossil fuel vehicles on the road in a few years anyway? Whiners.

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