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6 hours ago, Boat said:

Go to the EIA website and look around. Many of your questions can be answered there. The drilling productivity report comes out mid month. Number of wells drilled by area. Number of completions, estimated production gain or loss by well avg and by play. There is a spreadsheet that tracks all the way back to 2014 that is facinating. If you have troubling finding a particular bit of info, holler. I will help if I can. First, in the search box type “Drilling Productivity Report”

Will do. Thanks.

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On 8/15/2019 at 9:43 AM, Douglas Buckland said:

Very true! The problem this day and age is that some peoples definition of onerous demands (I am not directing this at you...) is laughable. The work ethic today is pathetic, generally speaking. Working longer than an 8 hour day is considered criminal...although all they are doing is sitting at a desk working a computer. HSE departments have become 'kingdoms to themselves', issuing well worded mandates about operations they rarely see or understand.

I have never worked for ANY outfit, in over 30 years, which willingly put an employee at risk. 

Doug- We are currently up and running in Brasil its unbelievable what we need to do to get a guy offshore, we have to pay 110% taxes on the guys salary he also gets a thirteenth salary at christmas and a paid months holliday, we need to pay 20% extra for nights and god forbid he has to work overtime. If he does more than fourteen days we also get crucified and then after all this he will quit in a few months then take us to court and win.

Welcome to BRAAASSSSSSIIIILLLLLLLL

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1 hour ago, James Regan said:

Doug- We are currently up and running in Brasil its unbelievable what we need to do to get a guy offshore, we have to pay 110% taxes on the guys salary he also gets a thirteenth salary at christmas and a paid months holliday, we need to pay 20% extra for nights and god forbid he has to work overtime. If he does more than fourteen days we also get crucified and then after all this he will quit in a few months then take us to court and win.

Welcome to BRAAASSSSSSIIIILLLLLLLL

My, how the worm has turned! I remember working there back in the mid-80's and it was a blast! None of what you mention, just guys doing their jobs offshore with the occassional helicopter strike or labor strike.

When the local guys went on strike the ex-pats just took over the jobs, secured the well and waited for the strike to be resolved.

When pulling the stack (I was ths Asst. Subsea Engr.) we'd work 20 hours on, 4 hours off until the stack was nack down and latched....and we thought that was fun!

We had no problem getting workers, the queue was a mile long!

I miss those days...

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1 minute ago, Douglas Buckland said:

My, how the worm has turned! I remember working there back in the mid-80's and it was a blast! None of what you mention, just guys doing their jobs offshore with the occassional helicopter strike or labor strike.

When the local guys went on strike the ex-pats just took over the jobs, secured the well and waited for the strike to be resolved.

When pulling the stack (I was ths Asst. Subsea Engr.) we'd work 20 hours on, 4 hours off until the stack was nack down and latched....and we thought that was fun!

We had no problem getting workers, the queue was a mile long!

I miss those days...

Doug didn't know you were a member of the "Black Art" are you still involved with subsea? Yes changed days indeed no longer just one SSE the last job I did in Australia had the rig crew 6 SSE and 17 third party subsea hands, changed days from the photo, this was taken on the Ocean Liberator in Congo, no assistance at all just the SSE, check the POD where some bright spark decided to shot blast and then prime the pod, it took me weeks to get it off.

Its still fun here but nothing like before Willys Bar is now a pastry shop, very sad I have fond memories of the goings on in Willys (wink wink)

 

0.jpeg

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Do you happen to remember Lord Jim's Pub in Ipanema? Many fond, if hazy, memories of the place.

Those were the days!

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5 hours ago, James Regan said:

Doug didn't know you were a member of the "Black Art" are you still involved with subsea? Yes changed days indeed no longer just one SSE the last job I did in Australia had the rig crew 6 SSE and 17 third party subsea hands, changed days from the photo, this was taken on the Ocean Liberator in Congo, no assistance at all just the SSE, check the POD where some bright spark decided to shot blast and then prime the pod, it took me weeks to get it off.

Its still fun here but nothing like before Willys Bar is now a pastry shop, very sad I have fond memories of the goings on in Willys (wink wink)

 

0.jpeg

I haven't practiced the Black Art since around 1988 when I was sent to the North Sea as a Rig Engineer on the Sedco 706 (that dates me!).

Worked as Assistant Subsea on the Sedco 709 in Brazil and on the 471 in the Gulf of Mexico.

In about 1986 or so, the 709 (DP semi) drilled the world record water depth well (5330 feet of water 😆). The subsea department consisted of the Sunsea Engineer, the Assistant Subsea Engineer and occassionally the Drilling Equipment Engineer if he felt like helping.

Between yo-yoing the stack and cutting/slipping the 16 tensioners plus the myriad of other day to day chores, these were busy 28 day hitches!

I look back on them fondly, some of the best days of my life!

That Aussie job you mentioned with 6 SSE's and 17 third party SSE's....unbelievable! Didn't this many guys simply gum up the works?

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2 hours ago, Douglas Buckland said:

I haven't practiced the Black Art since around 1988 when I was sent to the North Sea as a Rig Engineer on the Sedco 706 (that dates me!).

Worked as Assistant Subsea on the Sedco 709 in Brazil and on the 471 in the Gulf of Mexico.

In about 1986 or so, the 709 (DP semi) drilled the world record water depth well (5330 feet of water 😆). The subsea department consisted of the Sunsea Engineer, the Assistant Subsea Engineer and occassionally the Drilling Equipment Engineer if he felt like helping.

Between yo-yoing the stack and cutting/slipping the 16 tensioners plus the myriad of other day to day chores, these were busy 28 day hitches!

I look back on them fondly, some of the best days of my life!

That Aussie job you mentioned with 6 SSE's and 17 third party SSE's....unbelievable! Didn't this many guys simply gum up the works?

Lots of tensioner sipping and cutting in the North Sea makes you glad to live somewhere warm now... Regarding the Oz job it’s changed days these guys must work in two’s and work maintenance like the aero industry from work packs, photos and instructions takes three hours to pull and SPM and redress. Also lots of work now being done on the MUX pods on the electrical. Side.

With dual activity rigs your window to get the BOP between the two holes ie we’ll center is very short, the idea being that while one side of the Derrick is drilling top hole the other side is running conductor to sea bed, skid over and run conductor with 20inch shoe, meanwhile you have picked up the BOP off the beam and it’s ran subsea so that when the 20 in wellhead crossover etc has been landed and cemented bang you skid back and latch the stack up, no waiting on cement to set.

Yes changed days indeed, but this side of the business is great as we get a bit of everything.

706 was down here for years, currently being scrapped.

 

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(edited)

4 hours ago, Douglas Buckland said:

I haven't practiced the Black Art since around 1988 when I was sent to the North Sea as a Rig Engineer on the Sedco 706 (that dates me!).

Worked as Assistant Subsea on the Sedco 709 in Brazil and on the 471 in the Gulf of Mexico.

In about 1986 or so, the 709 (DP semi) drilled the world record water depth well (5330 feet of water 😆). The subsea department consisted of the Sunsea Engineer, the Assistant Subsea Engineer and occassionally the Drilling Equipment Engineer if he felt like helping.

Between yo-yoing the stack and cutting/slipping the 16 tensioners plus the myriad of other day to day chores, these were busy 28 day hitches!

I look back on them fondly, some of the best days of my life!

That Aussie job you mentioned with 6 SSE's and 17 third party SSE's....unbelievable! Didn't this many guys simply gum up the works?

Changed days we can't even do this anymore, its considered unprofessional, this was in the North Sea back in the day, pressure testing BOPs, boy it was cold....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phog9w1n2xM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4160D7FAVE&t=12s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGSVSlpKQAE

A few clips the second is not mine but I'm sure should show we are not that bad for the environment, we do care...

Edited by James Regan

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4 hours ago, James Regan said:

Lots of tensioner sipping and cutting in the North Sea makes you glad to live somewhere warm now... Regarding the Oz job it’s changed days these guys must work in two’s and work maintenance like the aero industry from work packs, photos and instructions takes three hours to pull and SPM and redress. Also lots of work now being done on the MUX pods on the electrical. Side.

With dual activity rigs your window to get the BOP between the two holes ie we’ll center is very short, the idea being that while one side of the Derrick is drilling top hole the other side is running conductor to sea bed, skid over and run conductor with 20inch shoe, meanwhile you have picked up the BOP off the beam and it’s ran subsea so that when the 20 in wellhead crossover etc has been landed and cemented bang you skid back and latch the stack up, no waiting on cement to set.

Yes changed days indeed, but this side of the business is great as we get a bit of everything.

706 was down here for years, currently being scrapped.

 

I've never even seen a dual activity rig!😂

Most of my work in the past 20 years has been on jack-ups and dirt rigs...which are fun as well!

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2 hours ago, James Regan said:

Changed days we can't even do this anymore, its considered unprofessional, this was in the North Sea back in the day, pressure testing BOPs, boy it was cold....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phog9w1n2xM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4160D7FAVE&t=12s

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGSVSlpKQAE

A few clips the second is not mine but I'm sure should show we are not that bad for the environment, we do care...

The video of using the ROV to save the swordfish is priceless!

We used to see groupers about the size of Volkswagen Beetles around the stack in Brazil.

Typical HSE calling that behaviour unprofessional! I pity the guys working the rigs today, the fun and comraderie can't compare to the 'old days'. 

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It's the price if the barrel not activity, not disclosing transfer

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Checking BOP equipment will give better readings to a wells activity

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