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New Internal Combustion Engine Design

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Hi All,  I have been reading Oilprice.com for some time, but this is the first topic post.  My father is a mechanical engineer and has developed a new engine design.

You can see a video and description here:

Lucasengines.com

We think it will replace eventually replace every combustion engine out there, and will be green competitive with electric/battery vehicles.  It will be quite useful for the aviation and maritime engine markets.

Lightweight, simple, smaller, more torque, more efficient engine that dispenses with the gearbox(transmission).

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In regards to the oil markets, we think that the energy savings for transportation will be offset by the emergence of a personal helicopter market.

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Hey I dont want to get too into depth about it but I'm not sold . It doesn't look any smaller or have any reason to produce more power per cc. It seems as if someone said hey I want to make a reliable rotary engine that the seals wont wear out early and has mechanical timing without a belt or chain. So you mix a rotary with a piston and give it 2 stroke like one way valves ... there are lots of issues to name but combining 3 engines does not make 1 engine more simple. As for power per cc unless you can turbo it and put 2x the air and fuel when wanted it wont make any more power than any other engine per cc. Also to make an ultra small engine with lots of power you'd want to use diesel as it has more btu and burns slower and therefore is easier to utilize all the btu . Also the ratio of fuel that makes rich or lean is way wider 6x ish so you can add or subtract way more fuel as needed and not melt the internals . And it's a lubricant so the engines last 500K + 

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New technology is electric valves. Electric turbos. Starter/alternator / e boost motor all in one. Variable compression.  Cylinder deactivation.Taking all the bells and whistles that drag when not in use off mechanical link. 

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Also if you wanted 2 stroke like power (2x more power stokes + half the drag) at 4 stroke reliability just seal the crankcase and have forced induction with regular valves. The rotary engine is smart but its ideal replacement is an electric motor but battery costs are still too high. And charging too slow. Also the other uses for ice are not battery friendly ... watercraft and aircraft. Only short range small vehicles are battery friendly at the moment. 

Finally as an engine designe that the power goes through the the turning device is a turbine engine. Chrysler tried it in the 50s and Jay Leno has one in a wrist rocket  from a superbike company . But it uses tons of fuel at idle and is only super efficent near peak power . 

As a kid I thought out every way to make an engine and I've found outside overlapping technologies the ice is pretty damn good already. 

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(edited)

Hi Rob,  Yes, it will have longer lasting seals.

I will try to answer though I am not a gearhead, let alone an engineer.

It is quite a bit physically smaller.  The the expansion area following the combustion chamber wraps around the rotor.  For example, if it has a 3x2 configuration so that would be 6 combustion events per revolution, equivalent to a V - 12.   A rotor diameter of 12" with an inch vane motor gap by 4" wide, with 6 combustion events per revolution has a cubic inch expansion area of approximately 240 cu. in. but that is not really an apples to apples comparison.

Lucas conservatively estimates a 50% weight reduction in the engine/drive train of a comparatively powered engine, 60% projected.

You are correct in your statement about volume of air needed for more power.  The linear piston variably compresses air up to 30 to 1 and the gasoline would be fuel injected.  Stoichiometric combustion (near ideal) is the term my father uses.  Fuel injection would control the amount of fuel depending on load demand.

My father would disagree with you regarding the use of diesel, though the engine could potentially be multi fueled with the correct software.  This engine design takes advantage of a quick combustion event.  The 2/4/diesel engines all require slow burning to prevent backfiring.

Edited by John Paul de Oliveira

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(edited)

Yes, the modern engine is truly an engineering marvel to attempt variable compression and cylinder deactivation.  This engine inherently has those features, not as add ons.

I wrote attempt, because the variation in compression is quite limited.  All that effort shows how important it is.

Edited by John Paul de Oliveira
addition

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I agree Rob with your assessment of the limitations of electric/battery.  Cost - though that is going down and should continue to do so. 

Charging - up against some hard limits of physics.  Someone calculated a 10 minute recharge for an average car and it was like a small lightning bolt going through the conductors.  I do not see that as ever changing. 

Battery energy density -  IMO this is where our future competition might happen.  But the energy density of a pound of gasoline is quite a bit higher than a pound of batteries.  Improvements will be made, but there may never be a battery with equivalent density, it is not even close at this point.  So, like you mentioned, aviation and maritime uses are severely limited for electric/battery.

The advantages of turbines will always be there, and the current niche use should hold for decades.

Anyways, again, I am not an engineer, but I can forward specific questions on to the inventor. 

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The rotary engine has the same basic limitations as the 2/4/diesel.  The compression and combustion occur in the same mechanism.   

The use of pistons in this engine takes advantage of what pistons are great at - compression, they are not good at producing usable torque. 

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I like your replies very polite . Engines are cool no matter what type. I'd love to see this new one in action. What meters incoming air and or compression of the charge? 

About fuel gas and diesel they are perfect for ease and safety of transport and high btu content to weight . Some trains are electric but use diesel generators as it's cheaper than a massive battery.  I saw once a train cart advertising the cart using 2L/100km to transport a full cart... very impressive if you understand the weight per cart.  

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On 10/4/2019 at 12:12 PM, John Paul de Oliveira said:

Hi All,  I have been reading Oilprice.com for some time, but this is the first topic post.  My father is a mechanical engineer and has developed a new engine design.

You can see a video and description here:

Lucasengines.com

We think it will replace eventually replace every combustion engine out there, and will be green competitive with electric/battery vehicles.  It will be quite useful for the aviation and maritime engine markets.

Lightweight, simple, smaller, more torque, more efficient engine that dispenses with the gearbox(transmission).

Is there a working prototype?

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3 hours ago, BenFranklin'sSpectacles said:

Is there a working prototype?

I could not find any on his own website and how you would ever keep the sliding seals from gumming up/cooling is a really good question.  It is a good solution, but carbon build up and maybe internal cooling via pumped oil??? I can see how you could keep it lubricated and indeed would have to as the ring seals of the spinning chamber would also need cooled.  Could do it with ring sliding seals of their own on the extending seal I suppose just like in a normal  engine. 

Suppose I could build one in all my spare time... Optimum chamber would probably be a spiral so gases do not have to turn 90 degrees creating back pressure. 

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On 10/5/2019 at 3:12 AM, John Paul de Oliveira said:

Lucasengines.com

I use to write a bit about experimental engines as a reporter. I had a quick look at the site. The engine seems fine and I'm sure will work well if given the chance The problem is that it has to offer a substantial, unmistakable advantage over existing internal combustion technology before anyone will give it a go, and even then getting acceptance with technology that has not been proved with countless hours of on-road experience will prove difficult indeed. Your best bet is to try for niche applications and even then you'll find you'll have to make the engine and sell it - much like they had to with the first PCs. There are or were plenty of engines using different technology out there. All hit the barriers I'm talking about.. designing and building the engine is the fun, easy part..  marketing is the hard part.

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