Plants are Dying

1 hour ago, James Regan said:

Most who have been on an deep sea vessel will be familiar with this table, the 12Nm rule is still in force but most drilling rigs have far more stringent waste rules in place, in short nothing goes overboard.

I was actually thinking more about production activities than exploration, but how about this 10 year oil spill

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taylor_oil_spill

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@James Regan I should mention I love the offshore industry. I just call BS when I see it. When you point 1 finger at other you point 3 at yourself. 

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There are so many opportunities arising in the clean energy sector.  Why can't Alberta understand that the sooner they succumb to common sense, instead of allowing themselves to be duped by the moneymen, the sooner they'll get their 'prosperity' back?  Pursuing an oil future guarantees a future of poverty and pain.

We need lithium ion batteries.  You can sell those faster than you can make them, unlike the toxic oil reserves that sit around.  I'm tired of screaming at the Canadians I know to get off their stupid Axxxes and think about the children.  What you get is what you deserve now.

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5 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

@James Regan I should mention I love the offshore industry. I just call BS when I see it. When you point 1 finger at other you point 3 at yourself. 

@Rasmus Jorgensen point taken and the location of the Taylor spill is loaded with unmanned production facilities. I have no problem with being shown the way, I can only really respond in my specific area of experience, plenty of Google Warriors ready to be reply with instantly gained knowledge.

The abandonment and clean up for these marginal facilities should be addressed and soon, most were or have become mom and pop set ups which are conveniently forgotten and are used more as either good spots to fish of helicopter fueling stations.

Just one trip on a helicopter at 10,000ft and you can see the slicks being given off by these semi abandoned platforms.

Big oil IMO do take all the measures either by regulation or in house to avoid spillage and dumping, however the same cannot be said for these marginal platforms which have a huge and direct impact on the communities close by.

Im not defending the famous blowouts that have polluted Deepwater but it’s fact that more oil naturally seeps into the GOM  each year than that famous blowout in 2010.

There are worms and microbiological species that thrive on natural oil vents and hydrates.

The diagram shows how naturally occurring oil vents follow the same pattern but we can’t blame Mother Nature.

i have probably pointed ten fingers at myself with this reply but it’s all relevant.

4B185947-73A5-446C-B73D-915D246CC506.jpeg

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There is always an extinction event before an explosion of evolution event. 

 

Its nature redecorating, it tosses out the old and tries something new

 Humans may not be able to maintain  a population in the high billions perpetually, but we sure aren't going extinct and will be part of the evolution. We should celebrate our future in a new world of which we know little about right now except that it will have more co2 In the atmosphere, probably.warmer, and we have lots of examples of high co2 hot earth climates in the distant past. Life exploded out of everywhere. 

 

So doomsdayers, please just chill out and relax! A hotter earth will have far more new habitable land in canada and Russia then the tiny bits of coastal area that we lose.

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4 hours ago, James Regan said:

Most who have been on an deep sea vessel will be familiar with this table, the 12Nm rule is still in force but most drilling rigs have far more stringent waste rules in place, in short nothing goes overboard.

Waste or garbage is the least of worries, the drilling industry has taken huge steps in cutting the release of well bore cuttings being dumped at sea. There are many other aspects of “waste” that is covered but not really made available to the public or the public are not interested in seeing the whole picture.

http://www.imo.org/en/About/Conventions/ListOfConventions/Pages/International-Convention-for-the-Prevention-of-Pollution-from-Ships-(MARPOL).aspx

The MARPOL table which by law must be available and posted all over vessels could probably be updated as it’s ambiguous at best.

368B2210-513F-4C82-87FE-869013F1FA72.jpeg

I wonder how many people on those boats even know what "comminuted" means? 

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2 hours ago, Refuso Againo said:

There are so many opportunities arising in the clean energy sector.  Why can't Alberta understand that the sooner they succumb to common sense, instead of allowing themselves to be duped by the moneymen, the sooner they'll get their 'prosperity' back?  Pursuing an oil future guarantees a future of poverty and pain.

We need lithium ion batteries.  You can sell those faster than you can make them, unlike the toxic oil reserves that sit around.  I'm tired of screaming at the Canadians I know to get off their stupid Axxxes and think about the children.  What you get is what you deserve now.

OK sure. Now, where does the lithium come from? Hint, not from a store, it comes from the ground, miles and miles of it gets disturbed to produce lithium via one of two methods, both environmentally Unfriendly

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27 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

OK sure. Now, where does the lithium come from? Hint, not from a store, it comes from the ground, miles and miles of it gets disturbed to produce lithium via one of two methods, both environmentally Unfriendly

actually they can be mined from the seabed as well. Try to look up deep green mining. 

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(edited)

31 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

actually they can be mined from the seabed as well. Try to look up deep green mining. 

What could possibly go wrong? 

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/features/2019-06-11/saving-the-planet-with-electric-cars-means-strangling-this-desert

And

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-39347620

 

Edited by Ward Smith
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41 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

https://www.ft.com/content/23ecf682-892a-11e9-97ea-05ac2431f453

No idea what happens to seabed when you collect nodules, but Allseas is legendary and if they are getting behind this it is because there's industrial logic to it...

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9 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

https://www.ft.com/content/23ecf682-892a-11e9-97ea-05ac2431f453

No idea what happens to seabed when you collect nodules, but Allseas is legendary and if they are getting behind this it is because there's industrial logic to it...

$150 million is nothing. Talk to the offshore folks here. A typical platform runs at least a billion, that's just belly up to the bar money, you need even deeper pockets to deal with gathering systems etc. Those nodules are in the middle of nowhere, so add logistics. Bottom line Senor @Refuso Againo is all wet. 

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(edited)

17 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

$150 million is nothing. Talk to the offshore folks here. A typical platform runs at least a billion, that's just belly up to the bar money,

what do you base that on? Just curious as I am one of the offshore folks and I know the economic side of offshore very well. 

BTW - what is interesting isn't the amount, but that it is Allseas investing. 

Edited by Rasmus Jorgensen

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20 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

$150 million is nothing. Talk to the offshore folks here. A typical platform runs at least a billion, that's just belly up to the bar money, you need even deeper pockets to deal with gathering systems etc. Those nodules are in the middle of nowhere, so add logistics. Bottom line Senor @Refuso Againo is all wet. 

better link and background... sorry thought this was implied

https://deep.green/news-detail/deepgreen-and-allseas-partner-to-harvest-deep-sea-metals-to-meet-skyrocketing-growth-in-electric-vehicle-demand/

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38 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

what do you base that on? Just curious as I am one of the offshore folks and I know the economic side of offshore very well. 

BTW - what is interesting isn't the amount, but that it is Allseas investing. 

I'll be meeting with some folks from Aker next week, I'll ask them how my back of the envelope "budgeting" is. 

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22 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

I'll be meeting with some folks from Aker next week, I'll ask them how my back of the envelope "budgeting" is. 

I am sorry if I came across arrogant or rude. 

Anyways, I am sure that the good folks at Aker can confirm that due to the current OSV market you probably buy a suitable "vessel platform" for less than USD 100 mio. Although I imagine it would be cheaper just chartering one and then investing in the gathering system; which I guess is where Allseas come in. 

 

The economics of this is much more comparable to the economics of an UDW drillship; probably cheaper. State of the art drillships have in recent years been sold 2nd hand for less than USD 70 mio. https://gcaptain.com/ocean-rig-pays-just-65-million-for-ultra-deepwater-drillship-at-auction/

 

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32 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

I am sorry if I came across arrogant or rude. 

Anyways, I am sure that the good folks at Aker can confirm that due to the current OSV market you probably buy a suitable "vessel platform" for less than USD 100 mio. Although I imagine it would be cheaper just chartering one and then investing in the gathering system; which I guess is where Allseas come in. 

 

The economics of this is much more comparable to the economics of an UDW drillship; probably cheaper. State of the art drillships have in recent years been sold 2nd hand for less than USD 70 mio. https://gcaptain.com/ocean-rig-pays-just-65-million-for-ultra-deepwater-drillship-at-auction/

No offense taken. Offshore isn't my normal playground but I do have something happening there I can't talk about due to NDA. That drillship bargain is unlikely to ever happen again, given that it took a major bankruptcy to pull it off. I'm quite surprised the creditors allowed it to go so cheaply. Just shows what a fustercluck Brazil has become…

I'm guessing since the nodules are only about 4 centimeters thick, a drillship is over kill. My thinking was a custom vessel with station keeping and either room to store or more likely room to process the nodules. Lots of ROV's and crew room. Maybe use a drillship that's being parted out, but almost everything on it is useless for this endeavor. If times are hard in offshore, you should send those guys your resume. I'd probably prefer lithium mining making a mess on the ocean floor than ruining vast swaths of Chile, China and Australia. 

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12 hours ago, Marina Schwarz said:

No, I followed events as they happened. 

In my humble opinion, the Deepwater Horizon disaster was simply due to human error. The equipment in use on the Deepwater Horizon was in use all over the planet on similar rigs and was deemed 'fit for purpose' right up to disaster.

If you go back into the records and study how they handled their liner inflow test, and the actions immediately thereafter, this is where I believe things began to fall apart.

It gets fairly technical from a well control perspective after this, and the disaster is well documented from this point.

If someone actually understood rig operations and so forth, the movie, although entertaining was technically a joke.

As a parting shot at the movie....who in their right mind would jump off the helideck with a lifejacket on? It is a great way to break your neck!

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Well, they investigated the hell out of it, so there's nothing I could add to that, especially since I'm not an engineer. Movies are movies. It was well made, I thought, despite the fact I had to endure Mark Wahlberg for, what was it, two hours? Spectacular, which was its point, I suppose.

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11 hours ago, Ward Smith said:

I'm guessing since the nodules are only about 4 centimeters thick, a drillship is over kill. My thinking was a custom vessel with station keeping and either room to store or more likely room to process the nodules. Lots of ROV's and crew room. Maybe use a drillship that's being parted out, but almost everything on it is useless for this endeavor. If times are hard in offshore, you should send those guys your resume. I'd probably prefer lithium mining making a mess on the ocean floor than ruining vast swaths of Chile, China and Australia. 

I think the key to making this a success is the gathering system (it would not be difficult to to charter a suitable large vessel or converted drillship to house the gathering system). And Allseas excells at designing things for offshore applications. That is why I think it is somewhat a sccop that they are behind this (and maybe even a bellwhether for the offshore industry, but that is a different discussion).

14 hours ago, Ward Smith said:

That drillship bargain is unlikely to ever happen again, given that it took a major bankruptcy to pull it off. I'm quite surprised the creditors allowed it to go so cheaply. Just shows what a fustercluck Brazil has become…

whilst I believe you are rigth that we won't see this level again any time soon there is still a lot more hurt coming for offshore drilling and offshore service companies. Just look at the mighy JFs Seadrill latest numbers... 

 

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On 6/12/2019 at 4:40 PM, James Regan said:

@Rasmus Jorgensen point taken and the location of the Taylor spill is loaded with unmanned production facilities. I have no problem with being shown the way, I can only really respond in my specific area of experience, plenty of Google Warriors ready to be reply with instantly gained knowledge.

The abandonment and clean up for these marginal facilities should be addressed and soon, most were or have become mom and pop set ups which are conveniently forgotten and are used more as either good spots to fish of helicopter fueling stations.

Just one trip on a helicopter at 10,000ft and you can see the slicks being given off by these semi abandoned platforms.

Big oil IMO do take all the measures either by regulation or in house to avoid spillage and dumping, however the same cannot be said for these marginal platforms which have a huge and direct impact on the communities close by.

Im not defending the famous blowouts that have polluted Deepwater but it’s fact that more oil naturally seeps into the GOM  each year than that famous blowout in 2010.

There are worms and microbiological species that thrive on natural oil vents and hydrates.

The diagram shows how naturally occurring oil vents follow the same pattern but we can’t blame Mother Nature.

i have probably pointed ten fingers at myself with this reply but it’s all relevant.

James,

I think we are talking about different things. I would prefer to avoid getting too detailed and just leave it at : Big oil takes short cuts where they can. They do it smartly so that they cannot be faulted, but they take shortcuts none the less. 

 

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On 6/12/2019 at 6:08 AM, Douglas Buckland said:

If the international community wants to force 'western' companies to adopt 'western' practices everywhere on the planet, you may as well hand over every contract in Africa, Asia and the Middle East to the Chinese and Asian companies.,They will NEVER adopt these practices and will underbid on EVERY contract!

I had to laugh years ago when some British firm got hauled into a British court for paying bribes in West Africa. That is how business is done there!

Once again, trying to transfer Western values to other cultures is doomed from the start.

 

Aren't there international laws that are meant to govern all such things. I was recently told that I could not gravel a drive to a new garage even though the neighbors have gravel drives. I got away with it but the new city inspector said that they were following "international codes" I about blew my stack but kept my cool and questioned the globalist rule being applied to my neighborhood. 

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In 1978 the SEDCO 445 drillship successfully mined around 800 tonnes of manganese nodules from the seabed. Not sure what happened after this.

The cost which you need to look at is the spreadcost of the vessel+crew+equipment+services onboard required for the operation. For a deepwater drilling operation the spreadcost can easily be $250,000 per day.

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