All Activity

Showing all content posted in for the last 365 days.

This stream auto-updates   

  1. Past hour
  2. These guys aren't using any petroleum are they? Chinese scramble to build 1000 bed hospital in 5 days. https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-7923913/Shanghai-Disney-closed-Saturday-help-prevent-spread-virus.html
  3. Gee, too bad we can't just Look it up
  4. Lol that's like me with cdn oil and gas stocks! But looking over the convo boy was I wrong on that oil trading thought! Glad I'm in a 28$ brent break even stock on weeks like this.
  5. Today
  6. Is it not time to do some physics experiments relating to the supposed effects of carbon dioxide? I suggest firing a carbon dioxide laser at the moon and measuring the amount of radiation absorbed on return to earth,through the atmosphere. As the amount of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is lower during the northern hemisphere summer,due to plant growth,the variation in radiation absorbed,against carbon dioxide concentration,could be measured. I am getting sick of the selective use of unreliable statistics by the global warmers. The great English Elizabethan thinker Francis Bacon said that the Scientific Method is to propose a theory and then to test it by observation,followed by reasonable discussion of the results. At school we were taught that an equation with an unknown in it cannot be solved. The global warmers need to go back to school. My guess is that there is possibly something untoward happening in the Arctic Circle. This could be due to the great Russian nickel smelter at Norilsk. This is the largest point source of sulphur dioxide in the world. Explorers have said that Arctic air smells of sulphur dioxide. The mist of sulphuric acid that it creates is likely to reduce the radiation of heat at latitudes where it should be at the greatest.
  7. As I do with many of your talking points posted deliberately to irritate. But that aside the prez has not tweeted the grand scheme of why he thinks we need over 4 mbpd of oil after his pipelines are built. Don’t you think the US citizens deserve some transparency and background on policy? Justification backed by needs or what are our gains? This seems like a fair expection.
  8. What also cannot be overlooked is inherent value of R&D development from Chinese perspective. For example know how in integrated circuits is valued many times its fair, market value. I mean that if ASML or Intel would be for sale China would gladly pay 3 times market value. The same with Boeing. Just for know how.
  9. Because A) that would be stupid, and B) it would make you happy.
  10. Jag was fixed b th they way. The culprit was a coolant leak in the on board charger. Very expensive but covered under warranty.
  11. Do you have an estimate of how much new offtake capacity the new standard and FSRU terminals will provide over the next few years? Any idea when the pipelines and LNG terminal on the Mexican Pacific coast will come online?
  12. If selling at a loss is difficult for you, get some practice. 1. Buy a dartboard. 2. Blindly throw a dart at the dartboard. 3. Even= go long on S&P or UNG or whatever that's not a penny stock and has liquidity. Odd = go short. Do it for a month. By the end of it you won't feel anything when you sell at a loss. And you won't lose any money from that lesson either (chances are you'll break even, unless you happen to be the unluckiest person in the world- in which case you've learned that you shouldn't trade because you've been cursed with unluck).
  13. Don't think its traded at the moment. There has been renewed interest in using the gas as a store of energy but at the moment if someone wants to use hydrogen they would make it themselves or contract another body to make it for a contract price - this is over the counter trading which means no active market to set prices..
  14. Yesterday
  15. Hi Dan, Not that difficult. Just capital intensive. Makes 99.99% shy away. The volatility in the crude market produces enormous premiums in the options market.
  16. Douglas Buckland Saturday at 03:12 PM Just imagine what the world would look like today if we had taken the same approach to Hitler’s Germany or Hirohito’s Japan. Doing nothing is the lazy man’s way out. Douglas, and all other commenters that are interested in economy of WW2. I encourage you to read about economic reality of late 1930s and early 1940s. Wartime GDP of the Great Powers 1938 to 1945 in International Dollars and 1990 Prices (billions)* Country 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 USA 800 869 943 1094 1235 1399 1499 1474 UK 284 287 316 344 353 361 346 331 France 186 199 164 130 116 110 93 101 Italy 141 151 147 144 145 137 117 92 USSR 359 366 417 359 274 305 362 343 Germany 351 384 387 412 417 426 437 310 Austria 24 27 27 29 27 28 29 12 Japan 169 184 192 196 197 194 189 144 Allied/Axis GDP 2.4 2.3 2.1 2.0 2.1 2.3 3.1 5.0
  17. Not really. High waves are to be expected. It wasn't easy for Thatcher back in the 80s either.
  18. These interactive presentations contain the latest oil & gas production data from all 24,837 horizontal wells in the Permian (Texas & New Mexico) that started producing from 2008/2009 onward, through October 2019. Visit ShaleProfile blog to explore the full interactive dashboard Oil production rose in October, to around 3.8 million bo/d (after upcoming revisions). As is visualized in the graph above, the over 4,000 horizontal wells that came online in the first 10 months of 2019 contributed more than half of the oil output in October (and over 75% if you include the 2018 vintage as well). Well productivity edged higher in 2019, which you can view in the “Well quality” tab. But this does not take into account that laterals also got longer, as explained in the previous post on this basin. In the Delaware Basin, where laterals increased by almost 50% between 2016 and 2019, well results are lower since 2016, on a normalized basis (image taken from our advanced analytics service Normalized well productivity in the Delaware Basin. Horizontal oil wells since 2013 only. In the final tab, all the major operators in the Permian can be found. Anadarko (not on the list) is not yet included in the Occidental numbers. Exxon Mobil is now also in the list; it has grown production even faster than its peers, as it quadrupled output since early 2018. The ‘Advanced Insights’ presentation is displayed below: This “Ultimate recovery” overview displays the average production rate for these wells, plotted against their cumulative recovery. Wells are grouped by the year in which production started. By extrapolating these curves, you can see that recently completed wells are on a trajectory to recover around 300 thousand barrels of oil before they have declined to a production rate of 40 b/d. But not all wells are created equally. The following dashboard, taken from ShaleProfile Analytics, displays all the horizontal wells that started production since 2011. The chart on the right ranks all the counties in the Permian Basin, by the average cumulative production in the first 2 years. The map shows you the location of all these wells, colored by the same metric: Howard and Midland county show the best results on this metric, with over 180 thousand barrels of oil produced in the first 2 years, on average. Early next week, we will have a new post on the Eagle Ford. The week after, we will be in Houston for the NAPE summit. If you are there as well, make sure you collect free caramel waffles at our booth #3019! Maybe you even would like to know more about our new production forecasting module? Production and completion data are subject to revisions. Note that a significant portion of production in the Permian comes from vertical wells and/or wells that started production before 2008, which are excluded from these presentations. For these presentations, I used data gathered from the following sources: Texas RRC. Oil production is estimated for individual wells, based on a number of sources, such as lease & pending production data, well completion & inactivity reports, regular well tests, and oil production data. OCD in New Mexico. Individual well production data is provided. FracFocus.org Visit our blog to read the full post and use the interactive dashboards to gain more insight: https://bit.ly/30Nh1lV Follow us on Social Media:Twitter: @ShaleProfile LinkedIn: ShaleProfile Facebook: ShaleProfile
  19. This article contains still images from the interactive dashboards available in the original blog post. To follow the instructions in this article, please use the interactive dashboards. Furthermore, they allow you to uncover other insights as well. Visit ShaleProfile blog to explore the full interactive dashboard These interactive presentations contain the latest oil & gas production data from all 24,837 horizontal wells in the Permian (Texas & New Mexico) that started producing from 2008/2009 onward, through October 2019. Oil production rose in October, to around 3.8 million bo/d (after upcoming revisions). As is visualized in the graph above, the over 4,000 horizontal wells that came online in the first 10 months of 2019 contributed more than half of the oil output in October (and over 75% if you include the 2018 vintage as well). Well productivity edged higher in 2019, which you can view in the “Well quality” tab. But this does not take into account that laterals also got longer, as explained in the previous post on this basin. In the Delaware Basin, where laterals increased by almost 50% between 2016 and 2019, well results are lower since 2016, on a normalized basis (image taken from our advanced analytics service Normalized well productivity in the Delaware Basin. Horizontal oil wells since 2013 only. In the final tab, all the major operators in the Permian can be found. Anadarko (not on the list) is not yet included in the Occidental numbers. Exxon Mobil is now also in the list; it has grown production even faster than its peers, as it quadrupled output since early 2018. The ‘Advanced Insights’ presentation is displayed below: This “Ultimate recovery” overview displays the average production rate for these wells, plotted against their cumulative recovery. Wells are grouped by the year in which production started. By extrapolating these curves, you can see that recently completed wells are on a trajectory to recover around 300 thousand barrels of oil before they have declined to a production rate of 40 b/d. But not all wells are created equally. The following dashboard, taken from ShaleProfile Analytics, displays all the horizontal wells that started production since 2011. The chart on the right ranks all the counties in the Permian Basin, by the average cumulative production in the first 2 years. The map shows you the location of all these wells, colored by the same metric: Howard and Midland county show the best results on this metric, with over 180 thousand barrels of oil produced in the first 2 years, on average. Early next week, we will have a new post on the Eagle Ford. The week after, we will be in Houston for the NAPE summit. If you are there as well, make sure you collect free caramel waffles at our booth #3019! Maybe you even would like to know more about our new production forecasting module? Production and completion data are subject to revisions. Note that a significant portion of production in the Permian comes from vertical wells and/or wells that started production before 2008, which are excluded from these presentations. For these presentations, I used data gathered from the following sources: Texas RRC. Oil production is estimated for individual wells, based on a number of sources, such as lease & pending production data, well completion & inactivity reports, regular well tests, and oil production data. OCD in New Mexico. Individual well production data is provided. FracFocus.org Visit our blog to read the full post and use the interactive dashboards to gain more insight: https://bit.ly/30Nh1lV Follow us on Social Media:Twitter: @ShaleProfile LinkedIn: ShaleProfile Facebook: ShaleProfile
  20. The 50 year plan of Russia is dead because of Renewables and other efficiencies, think electric.
  21. Actually Jan, the Chinese used to mainly buy Apple/Samsung phones, now they mainly buy Huawei/ZTE. Even have their own version of Nike shoes now, not to mention their own cars and aircraft. When it comes to electricity, real problem is that they have built too many coal-fired power generators. About 100 "ghost-cities" with power plant operating at 20% capacity, and they still building more!
  22. https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/China-s-housing-glut-casts-pall-over-the-economy https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-03-23/the-controversial-chinese-economist-uncovering-tough-truths https://www.scmp.com/comment/insight-opinion/article/2187551/chinas-commercial-property-market-thriving-even-residential It seems that China's retail sector is being Amazon'd. That is the only reason one would see retail properties vacant while warehouses are filling up. Prof. Gan's team at Chengdu should be doing another survey soon so we can get up to date numbers. I was expecting one to complete last year, but have not seen data yet. Data are also collected for Moody's and CBRE I suggest you look up Kyle Bass' presentations on the subject of China real estate and the state of banking. He has quite the argument to make. Your expectation of a planned economy mixed with a wild West private sector producing consistently good decisions is more deserving of the 95% probability of error. Your position appears to be that reading official statistics from a communist controlled country is sufficient to obtain a picture of what is going on there. Official stats need to be assessed as to bias and trend of error. It is the official stats that are unsubstantiated. Use private market surveys like Caixin or Markit etc. Or reports from the "truth to power" economists trying to nudge the party towards economically useful decisions and provide statistics that the NBS or its provincial suppliers of data do not want to pass on to the leadership.. You are being Naive. Do some homework and get a realistic picture. China is the biggest credit bubble in history. It is a colossal malinvestment in economic terms. They rushed ahead, building upstream industrial capacity to feed the rapid buildout of infrastructure, housing, retail and office space with no consideration of long term profitability Now that they have built up what they needed, that basic industry is just a useless albatross, with no market for its products. e.g. It produces steel of lower market value on the global market than the expensive Australian and Brazilian iron ore it was made of.
  23. Last week
  24. You make him sound like JFK....
  25. Just joined Oil Price.com today, in response to sinking oil prices. My futures took a real hit! Looking for opinions as to how far prices will fall, and when they will recover. Thanks.

  26. IHS: LNG industry set six new records in 2019 Records set by the LNG industry in 2019 are indicative of a sustained growth trend, with global LNG capacity expected to increase by more than 50%—from 283 MMtpa in 2015 to 437 MMtpa in 2020, according to a new report from IHS Markit. Records set by the liquified natural gas (LNG) industry in 2019 are indicative of a sustained growth trend, with global LNG capacity expected to increase by more than 50%—from 283 million metric tonnes per annum (MMtpa) in 2015 to 437 MMtpa in 2020, according to a new report from IHS Markit. “The ongoing pace of new investment is especially noteworthy considering a market context of weak global prices,” said Michael Stoppard, chief strategist, global gas at IHS Markit. “Not only did LNG grow at an unprecedented rate in 2019, but the industry also laid the foundations for continued strong growth into the middle of the decade.” 2019 LNG industry records Record levels of new investment. Final investment decisions (FIDs) for liquefaction projects were made at an extraordinary level of 70.4 MMtpa—40% higher than the previous all-time high reached in 2005 (50.4 MMtpa). The US, Russia, and Mozambique each set individual highs for levels of annual FIDs. Record levels of FIDs without long-term contracts. Some liquefaction FIDs were made either without long-term contracts or were underpinned by sales to affiliates. Such “affiliate marketing” reached a record 43 MMtpa. Affiliate marketing at this scale has not been common in the LNG industry. Historically, most projects have instead secured long-term offtake contracts prior to committing to investment. By choosing to proceed without third-party contracts, projects can be developed more rapidly. Record liquefaction project start-ups. New liquefaction start-ups amounted to 38.8 MMtpa of capacity, narrowly surpassing the previous high set in 2009. Recent start-ups were concentrated in the US, Australia, and Russia. The pace of project starts is expected to slow in 2020 to 28.6 MMtpa of capacity. The US will continue to dominate in this area as it mostly completes its current wave of projects. New global supply leader. Australia surpassed Qatar as the top LNG exporter for 2019, reaching 80.2 MMt relative to 72.5 MMt in 2018. Australia is expected to extend its lead in 2020 and retain its position as top exporter until 2023 when US is projected to become the largest LNG producer. Record European imports. Europe set records for imports each single month as well as for the year as a whole. Annual net imports totaled 87.2 MMt which exceeded the previous record of 65.5 MMt set in 2011. Imports are expected to remain strong in 2020 due to additional new liquefaction supply coming to market. New supply in 2020 is expected to outpace Asian demand growth and therefore maintain sales into Europe. Record Chinese imports. China overtook Japan as the world largest LNG importer in the month of December 2019, with volumes for the month reaching 7.3 MMt, compared to Japan’s 6.9 MMt. Even though Japan is expected to continue to be the world’s largest LNG importer on a total annual basis through 2022, 2019 marked the second year in a row of declining imports for the country, continuing an overall downward trend since 2015. China entered its fourth year in a row of record LNG imports, increasing its LNG imports 13.4% on a year-over-year basis. 2019 LNG trade figures LNG supply in 2019 totaled 373.0 million tons (MMt), up 11.8% from 2018 or 39.5 MMt. The largest increases in LNG exports came from the US (37.7 MMt total, up 15.2 MMt), Russia (30.2 MMt total, up 10.1 MMt), and Australia (80.2 total, up 7.7 MMt). Net LNG imports reached 358.8 MMt in 2019, up 40.5 MMt from 2018. Regionally, LNG imports grew the most into Europe, totaling 87.2 MMt relative to 49.9 MMt in 2018. For individual countries, the UK registered the largest growth (13.3 MMt total, up 8.1 MMt), followed by France (16.3 MMt total, up 7.8 MMt), and China (62.4 MMt total, up 7.4 MMt). Japan remained the largest LNG importer, receiving 77.5 MMt in 2019. However, this was a decline from 83.2 MMt in 2018, making Japan the market with the largest decrease in LNG imports in 2019. China remained the second largest importer over the entire year. South Korea remained the third largest importer in 2019, with 41.0 MMt, however it also had the second largest decline relative to 2018 (down 3.5 MMt).
  1. Load more activity