• Community Blog Entries

    US - update through February 2019
    These interactive presentations contain the latest oil & gas production data from 103,883 horizontal wells in 11 US states, through February 2019. Cumulative oil and gas production from these wells reached 10.8 Gbo and 116 Tcf. West Virginia is deselected in most dashboards, as it has a greater reporting lag for many horizontal wells. Oklahoma is for now only available in our subscription services. Visit ShaleProfile blog to explore the full interactive dashboards A thousand horizontal wells were completed every month last year, on average. But now the frantic growth in oil production in the past 2 years appears to have stalled. Production in the first 2 months of 2019 was slightly down, although revisions will probably bring the level back up close to the record in December, at just over 6.7 million bo/d. The “Well quality” tab reveals that average well productivity in the major tight oil basins increased again in 2018, but by a smaller margin than in the 5 preceding years. In the bottom chart (“Cumulative production profiles”), you will find that about 132 thousand barrels of oil are recovered in the first year, on average, versus 122 thousand barrels for wells that began production in 2017. The final tab lists the top 5 operators in these basins. Most are near their production highs, although ConocoPhillips saw a large reduction in output in February, especially in North Dakota where it is also one of the largest operators. The ‘Advanced Insights’ presentation is displayed below: This “Ultimate recovery” overview shows the relationship between production rates and cumulative production over time. The oil basins are preselected and the wells are grouped by the year in which production started. This chart confirms that initial well productivity in these basins has increased almost every single year. Associated gas production is up as well, as you’ll find if you switch ‘Product’ to ‘Gas’. The chart will then show that recent wells are also on a trajectory to recover well over 1 Bcf of natural gas, on average. The following screenshot, from our Professional Analytics service, reveals the top 10 oil-producing counties in these major tight oil basins. Click on the image to see the high-resolution version. McKenzie County in North Dakota is still clearly in the lead, followed by Reeves, Weld and Midland counties. Lea County (NM), in which output more than doubled in the past 2 years, is catching up fast. In the coming week, we will release a major improvement for our data subscribers: a REST API, that allows our customers to keep their database closely synchronized with ours, which is updated on a daily basis.   Early next week we will have a new post on North Dakota, which will release April production data in the coming days. Production data is subject to revisions. For these presentations, I used data gathered from the sources listed below. FracFocus.org Colorado Oil & Gas Conservation Commission Louisiana Department of Natural Resources. Similar as in Texas, lease/unit production is allocated over wells in order to estimate their individual production histories. Montana Board of Oil and Gas New Mexico Oil Conservation Commission North Dakota Department of Natural Resources Ohio Department of Natural Resources Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection Texas Railroad Commission. Individual well production is estimated through the allocation of lease production data over the wells in a lease, and from pending lease production data. Utah Division of Oil, Gas and Mining Automated Geographic Reference Center of Utah. West Virginia Department of Environmental Protection West Virginia Geological & Economic Survey Wyoming Oil & Gas Conservation Commission   Visit our blog to read the full post and use the interactive dashboards to gain more insight http://bit.ly/2WC8zap Follow us on Social Media: Twitter: @ShaleProfile
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    Eagle Ford - update through February 2019
    This interactive presentation contains the latest oil & gas production data from all 22,421 horizontal wells in the Eagle Ford region, that have started producing since 2008, through February 2019. Visit ShaleProfile blog to explore the full interactive dashboards February oil production came in at 1,22 million bo/d, the same rate of production as a year earlier. After revisions, it will be a little higher but still below the level at the end of last year. As is visible in the graph above, the contribution of wells that came online before 2018 was just about 50% in February. The ‘Well quality’ tab reveals that the performance of the 1,800+ horizontal wells that began production in the main formations (Eagle Ford & Austin Chalk) in 2018 was equal to those that started a year earlier (see bottom chart). You can also find that typically, after 6 years on production, wells have declined to a production rate of about 20 bo/d. There are of course major regional variances, which I will show later in this post. The ‘Advanced Insights’ presentation is displayed below: This “Ultimate recovery” overview reveals the relationship between production rates and cumulative production. Wells are grouped by the year in which production started. In the 2nd tab, you will find a ranking of all counties in the Eagle Ford, based on total oil production from these horizontal wells through February. Karnes is #1, with over 700 million barrels of oil produced, since 2008. Now, let’s take a closer look at how well productivity has evolved in the top 4 counties shown in this list. The following screenshot comes from our advanced online analytics service: The map shows the location of all the horizontal oil wells in these 4 counties (click on the image for a high-resolution version). The top right graph shows the average well performance over time, as measured by the cumulative oil recovery in the first 12 months. DeWitt County is in the lead, with close to 190 thousand barrels of oil recovered in the first year on production, on average. However, total oil production in this county has dropped close to a multi-year low, as completion activity has dropped (not visible in this image). Only 152 wells came online in this county in 2018 (vs. 383 in 2014).   In the middle of next week we will have a new post on all covered states in the US. We still offer free trials and demos in case you are curious to know what more you could learn from our analytics and data services: request a demo or trial.   Production data is subject to revisions, especially for the last few months. For this presentation, I used data gathered from the following sources: Texas RRC. Production data is provided on lease level. Individual well production data is estimated from a range of data sources, including regular well tests, and pending lease reports. FracFocus.org   Visit our blog to read the full post and use the interactive dashboards to gain more insight http://bit.ly/2WisrdR Follow us on Social Media: Twitter: @ShaleProfile
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    Permian – update through February 2019
    These interactive presentations contain the latest oil & gas production data from all 20,349 horizontal wells in the Permian (Texas & New Mexico) that started producing since 2008/2009, through February 2019. Visit ShaleProfile blog to explore the full interactive dashboards The breakneck growth in Permian production during the past 2 years appears to have taken a breather, at least temporarily. I expect that after revisions, production in February will come in 5-10% higher than shown here, or about 3.2-3.3 million bo/d. This would represent just a modest gain from the end of last year. Gas production is now above 10 Bcf/d. We sometimes get questions about whether our oil numbers include NGLs. That is not the case; many states do not require operators to report NGLs, and we therefore do not publish them either. If condensate is reported separately, we add it to the oil figures. The “Well quality” tab shows the production profiles of these 20 thousand horizontal wells. They are grouped and averaged by the year in which production began. You can easily see there that initial well productivity has increased further in the past 2 years, although less than in the period from 2013 and 2016. The wells that started in 2018 are on a path to recover almost 150 thousand barrels of oil in the first year on production, on average. However, this does not take into account that laterals have gotten longer, and that more proppants are used nowadays. If you normalize for either of these factors, as is possible in our advanced analytics service, you’ll find that well productivity already topped out in the middle of 2016. The ‘Advanced Insights’ presentation is displayed below: This “Ultimate recovery” overview shows the average production rate for these wells, plotted against their cumulative recovery. Wells are grouped by the quarter in which production started. As you can see here, peak rates are still going up. The more than a thousand wells that started in the final quarter of 2018 peaked at 880 bo/d, on average. They’re on a path to recover each around 300 thousand barrels of oil, before they’ve declined to a rate of 50 bo/d. The following screenshot (also from our advanced analytics service) shows how total oil production has developed in the top 8 producing counties in the Permian. Output in each of these counties has risen strongly in the past three years. The locations of the related horizontal wells are shown on the map. Later this week we will have a post on the Eagle Ford. Tomorrow at noon (ET) we will present a briefing on all the major shale oil basins in the US, in our ShaleProfile channel on enelyst. If you’re interested, register here for free: enelyst registration page.   Production data is subject to revisions. Note that a significant portion of production in the Permian comes from vertical wells and/or wells that started production before 2008, which are excluded from these presentations. For these presentations, I used data gathered from the following sources: Texas RRC. Oil production is estimated for individual wells, based on a number of sources, such as lease & pending production data, well completion & inactivity reports, regular well tests, and oil proration data. OCD in New Mexico. Individual well production data is provided. FracFocus.org   Visit our blog to read the full post and use the interactive dashboards to gain more insight http://bit.ly/2HHKJkB Follow us on Social Media: Twitter: @ShaleProfile
    Linkedin: ShaleProfile
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