Recommended Posts

Cement manufacture produces carbon dioxide from decomposition of calcium carbonate and also from the combustion of fuel that is burned to drive that endothermic decomposition. I suggest feeding briquettes of limestone powder and coal powder into the robust Lurgi gasifier where it could be gasified under pressure with oxygen and steam. The briquettes would be bound together with a little cement. The coal would burn and its ash would react with the limestone to give cement clinker. Water-gas shift would convert any carbon monoxide in the product gas into carbon dioxide and hydrogen by reaction with steam. The gas would then contain a large proportion of carbon dioxide,much of which could be condensed to liquid by chilling. The remaining gas could be burned in gas turbines to produce power. The clinker would have to be discharged dry,a technology which is already on offer. Calcium is a catalyst for the coal gasification reaction,increasing the reaction rate by several times. The terrible dust nuisance from conventional cement works would be largely avoided.

  • Great Response! 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

Stealing this.

😂

Seriously though, that seems like a really good idea. I would take that down and keep it a secret. 

Edited by KeyboardWarrior

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 3/3/2020 at 9:38 AM, Richard D said:

Cement manufacture produces carbon dioxide from decomposition of calcium carbonate and also from the combustion of fuel that is burned to drive that endothermic decomposition. I suggest feeding briquettes of limestone powder and coal powder into the robust Lurgi gasifier where it could be gasified under pressure with oxygen and steam. The briquettes would be bound together with a little cement. The coal would burn and its ash would react with the limestone to give cement clinker. Water-gas shift would convert any carbon monoxide in the product gas into carbon dioxide and hydrogen by reaction with steam. The gas would then contain a large proportion of carbon dioxide,much of which could be condensed to liquid by chilling. The remaining gas could be burned in gas turbines to produce power. The clinker would have to be discharged dry,a technology which is already on offer. Calcium is a catalyst for the coal gasification reaction,increasing the reaction rate by several times. The terrible dust nuisance from conventional cement works would be largely avoided.

Two limiting factors: Probably not enough coal ash to produce a significant amount of cement. Water gas shift probably wouldn't occur if there's oxygen present: The carbon monoxide would much prefer the burning option. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please see US patent 4439210 for gasification of coal with calcium carbonate.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0