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Tom Kirkman

Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas

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Please pay attention to the chart below.  Hard facts, hard numbers, no statistical f*ckery that I can determine.  No far left double talk or obfuscation.

It might be a good idea to take the time to understand* what this chart shows.  Comparison measurements of all energy sources in Quadrillion Btu.  Shown in a 70 year time span, for a good overall comparison.

 

*Demand for oil & gas is simply NOT going to go away any time soon, despite the hue and cry from oil & gas haters with agendas.

 

15787531_energychart.jpg.9084373a1a5c3ac44194200a25b8130a.jpg

 

Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas

Last week the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported something extraordinary. For the first time in 135 years, last year U.S. consumption of renewables surpassed consumption of coal.

960x0.jpg.e3ebf3c8a5834132f059ced702667577.jpg

 

There are two interrelated reasons for this: The collapse of coal consumption over the past decade, which was fueled by the rise of cheaper alternatives.

I have covered the reasons for coal’s collapse previously. The short version is that legislation to curb carbon emissions was passed about the same time the shale boom and renewable power revolutions created cheaper, cleaner alternatives to coal.

The graphic above shows the surge in renewables that helped collapse coal demand. This surge is better shown by the following graphic, which highlights the three categories of modern renewables that have driven the consumption surge: Wind power, solar power, and biofuels.

273434162_960x0(1).jpg.ed0f8773280da32cd1c81ca80f44c041.jpg

 

This milestone was highlighted by the EIA in a recent brief. The brief was based on the EIA’s Monthly Energy Review. Although most of the coverage over this development has focused on the fact that renewables overtook coal, there is another story within the data that is missing.

The Monthly Energy Review highlights all categories of U.S. energy consumption. So, how does the consumption of renewables and coal compare to our consumption of petroleum, natural gas, and nuclear power? The following graphic puts everything in context.

15787531_energychart.jpg.9084373a1a5c3ac44194200a25b8130a.jpg

 

What this graphic shows that the previous graphics don’t show is that it was natural gas that took the biggest share of coal’s market. Further, it shows that fossil fuels still dominate our energy consumption. Nuclear power consumption has remained flat for years, and like coal, has been surpassed by renewables.

Last year the U.S. consumed 11.3 quadrillion BTUs (quads) of coal and 11.5 quads of renewables. But we also consumed 36.7 quads of petroleum and 32.1 quads of natural gas. Each of these categories of fossil fuel consumption was greater than our combined consumption of renewables and coal, which provides a broader perspective on our energy consumption.

In total, the U.S. consumed 80.5 quads of fossil fuels, 11.5 quads of renewables, and 8.5 quads of nuclear power. Renewables represented 11.4% of U.S. energy consumption in 2019, versus 8.1% a decade ago.

So, renewables did play an important part in coal’s demise, but they often get most of the credit. In fact, without cheap natural gas from the shale gas boom, U.S. coal consumption would still be substantially higher than U.S. renewable energy consumption.

 

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1 hour ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Please pay attention to the chart below.  Hard facts, hard numbers, no statistical f*ckery that I can determine.  No far left double talk or obfuscation.

It might be a good idea to take the time to understand* what this chart shows.  Comparison measurements of all energy sources in Quadrillion Btu.  Shown in a 70 year time span, for a good overall comparison.

 

*Demand for oil & gas are simply NOT going to go away any time soon, despite the hue and cry from oil & gas haters with agendas.

 

15787531_energychart.jpg.9084373a1a5c3ac44194200a25b8130a.jpg

 

Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas

Last week the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reported something extraordinary. For the first time in 135 years, last year U.S. consumption of renewables surpassed consumption of coal.

960x0.jpg.e3ebf3c8a5834132f059ced702667577.jpg

 

There are two interrelated reasons for this: The collapse of coal consumption over the past decade, which was fueled by the rise of cheaper alternatives.

I have covered the reasons for coal’s collapse previously. The short version is that legislation to curb carbon emissions was passed about the same time the shale boom and renewable power revolutions created cheaper, cleaner alternatives to coal.

The graphic above shows the surge in renewables that helped collapse coal demand. This surge is better shown by the following graphic, which highlights the three categories of modern renewables that have driven the consumption surge: Wind power, solar power, and biofuels.

273434162_960x0(1).jpg.ed0f8773280da32cd1c81ca80f44c041.jpg

 

This milestone was highlighted by the EIA in a recent brief. The brief was based on the EIA’s Monthly Energy Review. Although most of the coverage over this development has focused on the fact that renewables overtook coal, there is another story within the data that is missing.

The Monthly Energy Review highlights all categories of U.S. energy consumption. So, how does the consumption of renewables and coal compare to our consumption of petroleum, natural gas, and nuclear power? The following graphic puts everything in context.

15787531_energychart.jpg.9084373a1a5c3ac44194200a25b8130a.jpg

 

What this graphic shows that the previous graphics don’t show is that it was natural gas that took the biggest share of coal’s market. Further, it shows that fossil fuels still dominate our energy consumption. Nuclear power consumption has remained flat for years, and like coal, has been surpassed by renewables.

Last year the U.S. consumed 11.3 quadrillion BTUs (quads) of coal and 11.5 quads of renewables. But we also consumed 36.7 quads of petroleum and 32.1 quads of natural gas. Each of these categories of fossil fuel consumption was greater than our combined consumption of renewables and coal, which provides a broader perspective on our energy consumption.

In total, the U.S. consumed 80.5 quads of fossil fuels, 11.5 quads of renewables, and 8.5 quads of nuclear power. Renewables represented 11.4% of U.S. energy consumption in 2019, versus 8.1% a decade ago.

So, renewables did play an important part in coal’s demise, but they often get most of the credit. In fact, without cheap natural gas from the shale gas boom, U.S. coal consumption would still be substantially higher than U.S. renewable energy consumption.

 

The decline in gas use between the early 1970's and mid 1980's is interesting. I didn't realise it had slumped I had always assumed gas demand had grown slowly with a big rise in use from the mid 80's with the 'dash for gas'. 

Who was producing less gas? The fall is from about 23 Quads to 18.

If demand wasn't falling then the gap was filled by Coal and Nuclear. 

 

 

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(edited)

9 hours ago, Tom Kirkman said:

Please pay attention to the chart below.  Hard facts, hard numbers, no statistical f*ckery that I can determine.  No far left double talk or obfuscation.

It might be a good idea to take the time to understand* what this chart shows.  Comparison measurements of all energy sources in Quadrillion Btu.  Shown in a 70 year time span, for a good overall comparison.

 

*Demand for oil & gas is simply NOT going to go away any time soon, despite the hue and cry from oil & gas haters with agendas.

 

15787531_energychart.jpg.9084373a1a5c3ac44194200a25b8130a.jpg

 

Renewables Overtake Coal, But Lag Far Behind Oil And Natural Gas

 

So 2006 was Peak Oil for the US!

Peak NG will be soon.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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The question is how sustainable is this energy mix ?

Consumption of 7 billion barrels of crude oil and equivalent o 6 billion barrels of natural gas is unsustainable in long-term like 15-20 years.

US makes use of depressed natural gas prices, on average 4-6 times lower than global market prices.

At the same time prices of WTI and Canadian heavy oil are also depressed.

At global market prices US economy cannot continue with such a high hydrocarbons consumption.

In electricity generation US should develop nuclear power.

And try to increase economy of ICE vehicles.

 

 

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(edited)

51 minutes ago, Marcin2 said:

 

And try to increase economy of ICE vehicles.

 

 

You mean like a BEV?

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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