Renewable Energy Use In Europe Didn’t Stop Carbon Emissions From Rising

The proliferation of renewable energy in the European Union in 2017 did not stop the majority of member states from increasing their carbon footprint. The European Union had a 25 percent growth in wind power and a six percent increase in solar, however, carbon emissions rose by 1.8 percent in 2017, according to a report from Greentech Media. Malta experienced the highest increase, with a 12.8 percent rise. Estonia and Bulgaria came next, with an 11.3 and 8.3 percent increase, respectively. Altogether, 20 EU member countries saw their carbon dioxide rates go up, while seven were able to cut their rates.
 

 

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So many of the save the planet actions were based on junk science or backed into front end data so of course the outcomes are not what was promised. And, now we have bad result..

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Is there any explanation for this? I can guess why emissions are rising in the Balkans but I don't know about the rest of Europe.

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The European Union expanded by 2.5% in 2017, its strongest performance since 2007 . Without the increase in renewables the  carbon emmission would have been higher.

But the capacity increase in renewables was not enough to satisfy the higher demand for electricity and more fossil fuels were used. 

An analysis by Sandbag, a Brussels and London-based not-for-profit climate change policy think tank, determined that the increase in emissions across the EU was largely due to greater use of lignite to fuel industrial growth.

https://www.greentechmedia.com/articles/read/european-renewables-are-up-so-are-carbon-emissions#gs.CTcvTWc

Another cause of this increase is the appetite of the european consumers for heavy SUVs and crossovers in Europe.  Data from the European Environment Agency (EEA) shows that average CO2 emissions from new cars sold in Europe rose by 0.4% in 2017.

https://www.automotiveworld.com/analysis/co2-emissions-rise-europes-new-car-fleet-bulks/

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1 hour ago, Guillaume Albasini said:

Another cause of this increase is the appetite of the european consumers for heavy SUVs and crossovers in Europe.  Data from the European Environment Agency (EEA) shows that average CO2 emissions from new cars sold in Europe rose by 0.4% in 2017.

https://www.automotiveworld.com/analysis/co2-emissions-rise-europes-new-car-fleet-bulks/

Ah, yes, this one I suspected. Thanks for confirming with numbers. I'm not sure Europe is being smart about nuclear energy.

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I also think a lot of the renewable energy components and their movements come from Europe so building more renewable energy plants (even offshore wind where large vessels are working offshore continuously) will produce more CO2 emissions in the short term.  

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Dear Europe: [eyeroll]

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On 5/16/2018 at 2:55 PM, OERLewis said:

I also think a lot of the renewable energy components and their movements come from Europe so building more renewable energy plants (even offshore wind where large vessels are working offshore continuously) will produce more CO2 emissions in the short term.  

Which reminds me: what's the average productive life of a wind turbine/solar panel? That would help put things in perspective.

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