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my my wind and solar to the rescue and helping keep costs down.......
 
........wind and solar, which generated 27 gigawatts of electricity during Sunday's peak demand -- close to 40% of the total needed....
 
 
"Texas is, by rhetoric, anti-renewables. But frankly, renewables are bailing us out,".......
 
"Because the price of wind and sunlight hasn't doubled in the past year like other resources, they are acting as a hedge against high fuel prices," said Joshua Rhodes, an energy researcher at UT Austin.............

CNN

Wind and solar power are 'bailing out' Texas amid record heat and energy demand

CNN Expansion DC - November 2021, Shoot ID: 1089822 ,  11/16/2021, Ella Nilsen

By Ella Nilsen, CNN

 

Updated 10:55 AM ET, Tue June 14, 2022

Wind turbines generate power on a farm near Throckmorton, Texas.
 
Wind turbines generate power on a farm near Throckmorton, Texas.

(CNN)Texans are cranking on the air conditioning this week amid an unusually early heat wave, setting new records for electricity demand in the state, which surpassed 75 gigawatts on Sunday and smashed the 2019 record. Texas grid operator ERCOT projects it could approach that peak again on Tuesday.

But unlike previous extreme weather events in Texas which led to deadly blackouts, the grid is holding up remarkably well this week. Several experts told CNN that it's owed in large part to strong performances from wind and solar, which generated 27 gigawatts of electricity during Sunday's peak demand -- close to 40% of the total needed.
 
 
"Texas is, by rhetoric, anti-renewables. But frankly, renewables are bailing us out," said Michael Webber, an energy expert and professor at the University of Texas at Austin. "They're rocking. That really spares us a lot of heartache and a lot of money."
Despite the Texas Republican rhetoric that wind and solar are unreliable, Texas has a massive and growing fleet of renewables. Zero-carbon electricity sources (wind, solar, and nuclear) powered about 38% of the state's power in 2021, rivaling natural gas at 42%.
This is a relatively recent phenomenon for the state.
"Wind and solar would not have been available in years in the past, so the growing capacity helps to alleviate reliance on natural gas and coal," said Jonathan DeVilbiss, operations research analyst at the US Energy Information Administration.
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Not only have renewables helped keep the power on during a scorching and early heatwave, they have also helped keep costs low. Prices for natural gas and coal are high amid a worldwide energy crunch, but renewables -- powered by the wind and sun -- have no fuel cost.
"Because the price of wind and sunlight hasn't doubled in the past year like other resources, they are acting as a hedge against high fuel prices," said Joshua Rhodes, an energy researcher at UT Austin.

Peak demand during peak heat

Texas and other states have been sweltering in triple-digit temperatures and dangerous heat indices. Texas state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon told CNN that San Antonio has been a particular hot spot; it recently hit 102.5 degrees Fahrenheit, setting a new pre-July record.
Texas is used to heat, but this year they're "getting August weather in May and June," Webber told CNN.
 
 
Experts said the Texas grid was built to withstand extreme heat moreso than the extreme cold brought by the deadly 2021 winter storm. But with the state now experiencing August-like temperatures in early June many questioned whether the Texas grid could withstand the longer, hotter summers fueled by climate change.
"As opposed to a winter storm, we were built for three months of 90-plus [degrees]," said Caitlin Smith, head of regulatory policy and communications at Texas-based battery storage company Jupiter Power. "Were we built for 4 months of 100-plus [degrees]? There's some uncertainty there."
If the early spikes in temperature persist this year, it could stress out the grid and power plants, Smith and Rhodes warned. As well as the grid is working right now, that could change if this summer continues to bring unrelenting heat.
 
"It's like the human body; heat stress is cumulative," Rhodes said. "The body has no time to recover. Power plants are like that as well, they need some time to recover."
 
Rhodes added that renewables have been a big help during this early surge by taking strain off the traditional thermal power plants that use coal and natural gas to keep the lights on.
Human-caused climate change is linked to rising global temperatures and extreme heat. And while it's too early to tell exactly how much climate change is to blame for the current heat wave, it's safe to assume it is a factor, said Andy Dessler who directs the Texas Center for Climate Studies at Texas A&M University.
"It's 100% certain that climate change is contributing to this," Dessler told CNN. "Everything's getting hotter. August is getting hotter; June is getting hotter. It is hot and this is the future."

Overcrowded transmission lines

Even though Texas is an oil and gas giant, renewables -- and particularly, wind -- have long been thriving there. Texas generates the most wind energy in the country: In 2020, it produced more wind electricity than Iowa, Kansas, and Oklahoma — the next three highest states — combined, according to the US Energy Information Administration.
Solar has been a smaller portion of the state's energy mix than wind, but it is growing as well. Solar generated about 4% of electricity in Texas last summer, and is expected to grow to 7.2% this summer, EIA projections show.
 
Building out more solar will be important to deal with heat waves in the depths of summer, when wind speeds tend to drop, experts told CNN. That's because if it's really hot out, there's a good chance the sun is beating down.
But Rhodes and Webber pointed to infrastructure issues limiting the potential of renewables; Texas needs more transmission lines to carry energy generated by renewables to customers. Rhodes pointed to ERCOT projects showing higher solar numbers than what was actually being used; a casualty of over-crowded power lines that can't let the power through to consumers.
"About half of the solar that could be produced is not being produced right now because there's no more room on the lines," Rhodes said. "The numbers for renewables would probably be higher if we had the transmission capacity to move them around."
Wind and solar have natural variability as well; solar can't generate energy during nighttime, and wind turbines don't turn when the wind isn't blowing. That is spurring a big focus on developing more massive batteries that can store and deploy renewable energy when the wind isn't blowing, and the sun isn't shining.
"It does keep growth of renewables strong; it allows you to firm up that renewable capacity," Smith said.
Correction: This story has been updated to correct Joshua Rhodes' name.
Edited by notsonice
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(edited)

Lithium roadblocks will scuttle the Green Dream.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Energy-Transition-Goals-At-Risk-As-EU-May-Label-Lithium-As-Toxic.html

"European Commission could move to put lithium on a list of toxic substances.

This piece of regulation could drive up prices across the battery supply chain.

Should the European Commission take this decision, it may undermine the EU’s energy security."

 

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

On 6/13/2022 at 9:58 PM, Boat said:

Tesla is 70% of EV in the states. Tesla is 3% of US cars. Over 50% of new Tesla uses phosphate instead of lithium. Just saw that on a video. No clue how accurate the info is. But obviously Tesla is moving away from lithium at least for now. To your point, how yes will lithium prices affect the pickup and the semi. Those products may need lithium, cobalt and nickel for more density, power etc. I don’t think the science is settled yet. 
Solar and wind are doing much better than Mongolian coal. Got some charts yet?

No, EVs are les than 1% of the vehicle market value.

Edited by Ecocharger

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On 6/12/2022 at 5:22 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

Delays are always the norms. Something that happens on schedule is always hailed as being phenomenal. 

Lithium blockages are not a delay but  a derailment.

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On 6/12/2022 at 8:42 PM, Andrei Moutchkine said:

The whole CO2 issue is a red herring. It happens to be the heaviest fraction of the atmosphere, so the overwhelming majority of it happens to be at the ground level. This makes it ill-suitable as a "greenhouse gas"

A similar kind of logic applies to the ocean, where the CO2 concentration overwhelmingly depends on a single factor - pressure/depth. That is, for the first couple of kilometers. The greater depths happen to be entirely devoid of dissolved gasses yet, so there is a nearly infinite CO2 sink available right there. (And no, it is not going to cause any perceptible "acidification" either)

CO2 is a very weak greenhouse gas, others are thousands of times more potent.

Changes in CO2  levels are negatively correlated with earth temperature changes.

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(edited)

I remember the big day in my childhood in the early 60's when my Dad managed to scrape enough money together to get a used pumpjack that he installed on the windmill that pumped our water. When it gets to 108F and the wind stops blowing, as it would do for several days in a row back then leaving us out of water to supply us, hogs, sheep, and cattle, we are going to need pumpjacks.

Windmills when the wind doesn't blow will leave you mighty thirsty for energy.

Solar with no wind leaves you mighty hot at night. We were obviously in the country and it was tough, but so were we back then. In the cities with all the asphalt, people will die. But, I guess that is okay of you love  "green" energy.

Edited by AlBub
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40 minutes ago, AlBub said:

I remember the big day in my childhood in the early 60's when my Dad managed to scrape enough money together to get a used pumpjack that he installed on the windmill that pumped our water. When it gets to 108F and the wind stops blowing, as it would do for several days in a row back then leaving us out of water to supply us, hogs, sheep, and cattle, we are going to need pumpjacks.

Windmills when the wind doesn't blow will leave you mighty thirsty for energy.

Solar with no wind leaves you mighty hot at night. We were obviously in the country and it was tough, but so were we back then. In the cities with all the asphalt, people will die. But, I guess that is okay of you love  "green" energy.

In the cities with all the asphalt, people will die.?????

and this is happening......or are you just a drama queen who loves fearmongering?????

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3 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Lithium roadblocks will scuttle the Green Dream.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Energy-Transition-Goals-At-Risk-As-EU-May-Label-Lithium-As-Toxic.html

"European Commission could move to put lithium on a list of toxic substances.

This piece of regulation could drive up prices across the battery supply chain.

Should the European Commission take this decision, it may undermine the EU’s energy security."

 

why are you worried????? seems like you would never use a battery for anything......I bet you are enjoying your gas powered clunker and the cheap price of gas.....Vroom vrooom ...what is it costing you to tank up a month ??? Big buckssssssssss Enjoy

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On 6/13/2022 at 8:11 PM, Ron Wagner said:

Who are you and tell us about your vehicle's? 

Do not be so...impersonal, it is not polite. Perhaps "But Dart" or something of your own personal perspective. 

Just a opinion.

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23 hours ago, Ron Wagner said:

Oil and gas have thousands of these experts on renewables pumping out fake news. Just like you guys. Note the large piles of Mongolian coal. 

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Nat gas used to be considered an excellent transition fuel to an electric economy. Unfortunately extreme volatility in price may push expansion into primarily wind and solar sooner rather than later. If tech pushes the efficiency of solar over 30% rapid dominance of market share will amaze even the rednecks. We’ll see, battery is another component up in the air. Lots of claims of lack of materials driving up price or slowing battery price drops. It’s hard to keep up with the negativity during the record sales. Same with Tesla, record sales contribute to lack of market share? These trolls are kinda cute. Weird, but entertaining. 

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(edited)

2 hours ago, AlBub said:

I remember the big day in my childhood in the early 60's when my Dad managed to scrape enough money together to get a used pumpjack that he installed on the windmill that pumped our water. When it gets to 108F and the wind stops blowing, as it would do for several days in a row back then leaving us out of water to supply us, hogs, sheep, and cattle, we are going to need pumpjacks.

Solar with no wind leaves you mighty hot at night. We were obviously in the country and it was tough, but so were we back then. In the cities with all the asphalt, people will die. But, I guess that is okay of you love  "green" energy.

Conservatives and their clinging to the past that was worse yet somehow better...

 

Edited by TailingsPond
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2 hours ago, AlBub said:

I remember the big day in my childhood in the early 60's when my Dad managed to scrape enough money together to get a used pumpjack that he installed on the windmill that pumped our water. When it gets to 108F and the wind stops blowing, as it would do for several days in a row back then leaving us out of water to supply us, hogs, sheep, and cattle, we are going to need pumpjacks.

Windmills when the wind doesn't blow will leave you mighty thirsty for energy.

Solar with no wind leaves you mighty hot at night. We were obviously in the country and it was tough, but so were we back then. In the cities with all the asphalt, people will die. But, I guess that is okay of you love  "green" energy.

So the way it works is that you build enough production capacity so that when the wind is blowing you can pump excess water into a storage tank. Then when the wind isn't blowing you use the water from the storage tank.

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5 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

So the way it works is that you build enough production capacity so that when the wind is blowing you can pump excess water into a storage tank. Then when the wind isn't blowing you use the water from the storage tank.

Yeah a storage tank ??? who would of thought of storing water and always having a weeks supply on hand..... and having stock tanks for their livestock......1960's were a real rough time in the boondocks.......he he he

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https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/The-UK-Is-Prioritizing-Energy-Security-Over-Climate-Pledges.html

 

The UK Is Prioritizing Energy Security Over Climate Pledges

By Felicity Bradstock - Jun 16, 2022, 2:00 PM CDT

  • The UK is prioritizing its energy security over its climate pledges with support for ongoing oil and gas operations.
  • Despite previous plans to end coal production by 2024, the UK government appears to be going back on its pledges.
  • In the face of rising consumer energy prices, which have sent many into fuel poverty, Johnson says that North Sea oil will be vital in tackling the cost of living.

The U.K. appears to be doing a 180 on its climate promises, as the government shows significant support for ongoing oil and gas operations and several new fossil fuel projects. Despite pumping millions into renewable energy developments, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has continued to back North Sea oil and has even shown interest in extending coal plant operations, having previously vowed to end coal production earlier than anticipated by 2024. 

Coming out of the COP26 climate conference last November, president of the summit Alok Sharma said the U.K. would press governments on their decarbonization promises, aimed at limiting global heating to 1.5C. The U.K. took a leading role in the summit, which was held in Glasgow, and will maintain its presidency until COP27 in Egypt later this year. 

As well as striving for net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, the U.K. government introduced a target to cut emissions by 78 percent by 2035 and for all of the UK's electricity to come from clean sources by 2035. The U.K. has already established itself as a world leader in offshore wind production, with renewables already producing around 20 percent of the country’s electricity. The government has also introduced wide-spreading decarbonization aims for housing, transport, flights and shipping, food, and industry. But only time will tell whether the U.K. is capable of meeting these targets as it faces increasing energy shortages and rising prices. 

But the government has already been accused multiple times this year of going against its net-zero targets by continuing to back oil and gas projects. In April, the U.K. launched its energy security strategy, which aims for long-term independence from foreign energy sources and the decarbonization of the U.K.’s power supply. The strategy also identifies oil and gas as key to the energy transition, with plans to boost production in the North Sea, stating “net-zero is a smooth transition, not an immediate extinction, for oil and gas”.

Johnson argues that North Sea oil and gas is a lower carbon option than imported energy and is necessary to meet domestic needs until the renewable energy sector is more developed. However, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gave a “now or never” warning in April, suggesting that new fossil fuel exploration would jeopardize the Paris agreement target of limiting global heating to 1.5C.

In the face of rising consumer energy prices, which have sent many into fuel poverty, Johnson says that North Sea oil will be vital in tackling the cost of living, encouraging companies to increase their investments in the energy source. The government is patently breaking its COP26 climate pledges by introducing a $6 billion tax raid on oil and gas, offering subsidies for fuel consumption as well as incentivizing drilling activities.

In May, Johnson stated, “To tackle inflation in the medium-term, you’ve got to deal with supply-side issues.” Adding, “So we need the energy companies to be putting some more into hydrocarbons, but we also need the whole country to be investing in more low-carbon energy.”Related: IEA Sees Oil Demand At Record High In 2023

This month, it emerged that the U.K. government was talking to Big Oil companies, such as Shell, about increasing oil and gas production in response to shortages due to sanctions introduced on Russian energy. This follows news that regulators approved the Shell Jackdaw natural gas field in the North Sea, having rejected it previously due to environmental concerns. 

Shell’s CEO Ben van Beurden said that the company will commence the Jackdaw project “as well as other similar ones... in fact, we have an interest in six of the UK’s 12 planned exploration wells,”. This is part of the company’s aim to increase its oil and gas market share from 10 percent to 15 percent over the next eight years. Shell is expected to invest $31 billion in U.K. energy before 2030, 75 percent of which will go to cleaner energy sources.

In addition, the government is likely to make a deal with a coal-fired facility in Nottinghamshire to maintain operations for longer than scheduled to ensure the U.K.’s energy security. Negotiations are taking place with French energy company EDF to delay the plant’s closure from October this year to next March. 

But the opposition and the public are taking notice of these recent changes in the government’s approach to energy. Environmentalists and the political party the Liberal Democrats criticized the government this month for approving gas drilling in Surrey Hills, in the South of England, despite environmental risks. Campaigners suggested that the government has an “obsession” with finding new fossil fuel developments. Greenpeace UK policy director Doug Parr said “with this decision the government is completely undermining local democracy, the planning laws that are supposed to protect our designated landscapes and the climate crisis in one fell swoop.”

Despite the U.K.’s leading role in COP26, its ongoing presidency, and its ambitious climate pledges, in the face of energy shortages and rising prices, the government seems to be quickly turning back to oil, gas and even coal, in a bid to ensure the country’s energy security.

By Felicity Bradstock for Oilprice.com

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/tesla-raises-prices-amid-surging-costs-11655388716?mod=tech_lead_pos3

 

Tesla Raises Prices Amid Surging Costs

Prices on some of company’s electric cars are going up by as much as $6,000

?width=860&height=573

Between 10% and 15% of Tesla’s cost structure is exposed to swings in raw-materials prices, the auto maker’s finance chief said in April.PHOTO: MARK HERTZBERG/ZUMA PRESS

By Will Feuer
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Updated June 16, 2022 3:53 pm ET
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Tesla Inc. TSLA 1.72% has raised the prices on some of its cars by as much as $6,000, as the electric-car maker grapples with surging costs along its supply chain.

The increase comes as the car industry faces rapidly rising costs on labor, transportation, raw materials and more. It also comes shortly after Tesla Chief Executive Elon Musk said he plans to cut 10% of its salaried workforce following a hiring spree that saw the company’s head count swell 45% in one year alone.

The company last raised prices in March, soon after Mr. Musk warned in a tweet that Tesla and his Space Exploration Technologies Corp., or SpaceX, “are seeing significant recent inflation pressure in raw materials & logistics.”

The latest price increase applies to certain cars across Tesla’s entire lineup. Its Model 3 long-range car is now going for $57,990, the company’s website showed Thursday, up from its prior price of $55,990. However, the prices of the Model 3 rear-wheel drive and performance cars didn’t change.


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Tesla raised the price on its popular Model Y long-range car by $3,000 while the performance version of the car got a $2,000 increase, according to the company’s website. The company lifted the price on its Model S dual motor all-wheel drive by $5,000 and on its Model X dual motor all-wheel drive by $6,000 to $120,990.

Representatives for Tesla didn’t respond to a request for comment.

Tesla shares were down more than 9% in recent trading at $633.80 amid a broader market downturn.

Mr. Musk in April said that prices take into account monthslong wait lists for its cars as well as expectations that costs will continue to rise.

“It may seem like maybe we’re being unreasonable about increasing the prices of our vehicles given that we had record profitability this quarter,” Mr. Musk said on the company’s quarterly earnings call. “Our prices of vehicles ordered now are really anticipating supplier and logistics cost growth that we’re aware of and believe will happen over the next six to 12 months.”

Mr. Musk added at the time that if the company’s expected cost increases didn’t materialize, Tesla may slightly reduce prices.

 

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2 hours ago, Boat said:

Nat gas used to be considered an excellent transition fuel to an electric economy. Unfortunately extreme volatility in price may push expansion into primarily wind and solar sooner rather than later. If tech pushes the efficiency of solar over 30% rapid dominance of market share will amaze even the rednecks. We’ll see, battery is another component up in the air. Lots of claims of lack of materials driving up price or slowing battery price drops. It’s hard to keep up with the negativity during the record sales. Same with Tesla, record sales contribute to lack of market share? These trolls are kinda cute. Weird, but entertaining. 

https://www.wsj.com/articles/tesla-raises-prices-amid-surging-costs-11655388716?mod=tech_lead_pos3

What do you have against rednecks? These are the people that feed everyone. They also own the land that you want to put wind turbines on. Being civil is a much better approach IMHO. 

As I have said many times, I want the technology that is most cost efficient. Biden is the main reason our prices have exploded in America. Trump had it right. All of the above. 

 

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3 hours ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

Do not be so...impersonal, it is not polite. Perhaps "But Dart" or something of your own personal perspective. 

Just a opinion.

I am very open about myself and my vehicles. An open book. I don't trust anyone who is not. 

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3 hours ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

Do not be so...impersonal, it is not polite. Perhaps "But Dart" or something of your own personal perspective. 

Just a opinion.

Most blogs have a profile that allows information on the contributors. I like to know who I am talking to. 

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https://www.wsj.com/articles/energy-inflation-derails-bidens-climate-agenda-11655460003

 

Energy Inflation Derails Biden’s Climate Agenda

Under the president’s watch, emissions have risen, renewable-energy development has slowed and oil and coal use is up

?width=860&height=573

Domestic oil and gas production has increased since President Biden came into office.PHOTO: ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

By Timothy Puko
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 and Phred Dvorak
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Updated June 17, 2022 9:29 am ET
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WASHINGTON—President Biden came to office vowing to cut dependence on fossil fuels, putting environmentalists in charge of energy policy and asking Congress for billions of dollars to fund a transition to cleaner energy.

Seventeen months later, greenhouse gas emissions are up, renewable-power development has slowed, and oil and coal consumption are on the rise. The biggest aspects of the green agenda are stuck in Congress, while Mr. Biden, facing surging energy prices and inflation, urged U.S. oil refiners this week to expand capacity.

Domestic oil and gas production has increased since Mr. Biden came into office and is projected to rise to record highs, but that has just inflamed concerns from environmentalists that Mr. Biden is backing away from his green agenda.

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“I thought the country had turned a corner,” said Mary Nichols, a former California regulator and longtime environmental leader, “that the country was headed in the right direction.”

“Now this last year or two leaves you wondering whether that is true,” Ms. Nichols said.

Mr. Biden reaffirmed his environmental commitments Friday at the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, a virtual summit he hosted with representatives of more than 20 countries and international groups, including the European Commission and China.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

How should the Biden administration balance its climate policy with the need to address high energy prices? Join the conversation below.

“The critical point is that these actions are part of our transition to a clean and secure long-term energy future,” Mr. Biden said, adding later, “The science tells us that the window for action is rapidly narrowing.”

At home, however, Mr. Biden’s agenda has run into the reality of rising oil prices, punishing inflation and policy conflicts. Mr. Biden pledged last year to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50% to 52% below 2005 levels by 2030. But doing so will require Congressional approval of measures such as tax incentives for clean energy, analysts say.

Coal-state Sen. Joe Manchin (D., W.Va.), who derailed Mr. Biden’s roughly $3.5 trillion climate and social spending bill last year, has been negotiating with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D., N.Y.) on a new bill that would include the tax incentives, but a deal is far from certain.

The stakes for Mr. Biden are high. High inflation and record gasoline prices at the pump are a political liability heading into the midterm elections, where Republicans have a chance to seize majorities in the House and Senate.

At the same time, Mr. Biden risks losing support among young and progressive voters by seeming to back away from his green agenda, activists and political analysts said.

 
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2 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/energy-inflation-derails-bidens-climate-agenda-11655460003

 

Energy Inflation Derails Biden’s Climate Agenda

Under the president’s watch, emissions have risen, renewable-energy development has slowed and oil and coal use is up

?width=860&height=573

Domestic oil and gas production has increased since President Biden came into office.PHOTO: ROBYN BECK/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES

By Timothy Puko
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 and Phred Dvorak
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Updated June 17, 2022 9:29 am ET
 
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WASHINGTON—President Biden came to office vowing to cut dependence on fossil fuels, putting environmentalists in charge of energy policy and asking Congress for billions of dollars to fund a transition to cleaner energy.

Seventeen months later, greenhouse gas emissions are up, renewable-power development has slowed, and oil and coal consumption are on the rise. The biggest aspects of the green agenda are stuck in Congress, while Mr. Biden, facing surging energy prices and inflation, urged U.S. oil refiners this week to expand capacity.

Domestic oil and gas production has increased since Mr. Biden came into office and is projected to rise to record highs, but that has just inflamed concerns from environmentalists that Mr. Biden is backing away from his green agenda.

Related Video

Record Gas Prices Are Driving More Inflation Pressure. Here’s How.
Record Gas Prices Are Driving More Inflation Pressure. Here’s How.
Record Gas Prices Are Driving More Inflation Pressure. Here’s How.Play video: Record Gas Prices Are Driving More Inflation Pressure. Here’s How.
Rising oil costs have helped push the national average price for a gallon of gasoline to $5 for the first time, and that's leading to increased inflation pressure across the U.S. economy. Photo illustration: Todd Johnson

“I thought the country had turned a corner,” said Mary Nichols, a former California regulator and longtime environmental leader, “that the country was headed in the right direction.”

“Now this last year or two leaves you wondering whether that is true,” Ms. Nichols said.

Mr. Biden reaffirmed his environmental commitments Friday at the Major Economies Forum on Energy and Climate, a virtual summit he hosted with representatives of more than 20 countries and international groups, including the European Commission and China.

SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS

How should the Biden administration balance its climate policy with the need to address high energy prices? Join the conversation below.

“The critical point is that these actions are part of our transition to a clean and secure long-term energy future,” Mr. Biden said, adding later, “The science tells us that the window for action is rapidly narrowing.”

At home, however, Mr. Biden’s agenda has run into the reality of rising oil prices, punishing inflation and policy conflicts. Mr. Biden pledged last year to cut U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by 50% to 52% below 2005 levels by 2030. But doing so will require Congressional approval of measures such as tax incentives for clean energy, analysts say.

Coal-state Sen. Joe Manchin (D., W.Va.), who derailed Mr. Biden’s roughly $3.5 trillion climate and social spending bill last year, has been negotiating with Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D., N.Y.) on a new bill that would include the tax incentives, but a deal is far from certain.

The stakes for Mr. Biden are high. High inflation and record gasoline prices at the pump are a political liability heading into the midterm elections, where Republicans have a chance to seize majorities in the House and Senate.

At the same time, Mr. Biden risks losing support among young and progressive voters by seeming to back away from his green agenda, activists and political analysts said.

 

coal use is up...Dead cat bounce

Did you forget Trumps COVID response was so bad he crashed the US and world economy.......

 

He crashed oil and coal production ...How many bankrupt oil producers under Trumps belt????? and coal production under Trump in 2020....off a cliff...... Trump begging the Saudis to dump oil in the US in 2020....so you would get cheap cheap cheap gas

 

Long term coal is toast...............enjoy the thought

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(edited)

13 minutes ago, Ron Wagner said:

 

Under the president’s watch, emissions have risen, renewable-energy development has slowed and oil and coal use is up

 

So the fossil fuel guys like Biden!

Damned either way...

If he incentives oil you guys bash him too

 

Edited by TailingsPond

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Worldwide coal is in more demand and use than ever. I am anti-coal but Asians are going to do whatever makes them a buck. They are not as worried about global warming as the rest of the world. America has greatly reduced coal use and has improved air quality more than any major country. That was with gasoline prices half of what it is under Bidenomics! That was less than two years ago! We now have rampant inflation and are possibly entering stagflation. The voters will let their voice be heard in less than four months. It will be interesting to view the aftermath. 

P.S The cat is not dead in Asia and is still alive in the West due to necessity. It will not be dying in our lifetime. 

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14 minutes ago, TailingsPond said:

 

So the fossil fuel guys like Biden!

Damned either way...

If he incentives oil you guys bash him too

 

The only policy I agree with him on is the support of Ukraine. The American firsters are often unsupportive. I think that weakening our number two adversary is a great goal as is helping Ukrainians help themselves and create a buffer against Russia. Belarussians are also watching this closely and are against aiding Putin in his aggression. Putin is using many non European Russians to avoid aggravating those near Moscow. 

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