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GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

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(edited)

4 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

India is desperately trying to ramp up coal output.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/India-Coal-Crisis-Is-Far-From-Over.html

"India is facing a “severe and protracted” power crisis due to the price inflation of coal, which the country uses to generate as much as 75 percent of its power, Indian media report, citing S&P Global Commodity Insights.

India found itself in the middle of a power shortage as several factors combined, including rising coal prices, which discouraged imports, leaving stockpiles at critically low levels, and a heat wave that pushed demand earlier this year much higher.

The country is working on boosting its domestic production, and this went up by 28.6 percent in financial 2021/22, which ended on May 31. This was a record high, at 777 million tons. However, boosting domestic coal production to a level of self-sufficiency will take a long time, which coal is needed now to power the economy."

Coal is too expensive.  Not good for coal when its only advantage is being cheap.

Damn coal causing a "severe and protracted power crisis." 

 

Edited by TailingsPond
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15,000 Tesla vehicles are already in the hands of Uber drivers through Hertz deal

Uber Tesla Comfort electric

 

Last year, Hertz announced an important effort to electrify its fleet of rental cars, led by a massive purchase of 100,000 Tesla Model 3 vehicles to be delivered over the next year.

Shortly after, Hertz announced that on top of adding Tesla vehicles to its rental fleet, the company also made a deal with Uber to offer its drivers access to the Tesla vehicles. 50,000 Tesla vehicles will be offered for rent to Uber drivers, and the company has an option for more if the program is successful.

Today, Andrew Macdonald, Uber’s senior vice president of mobility and business operations, announced that already 15,000 Uber drivers have rented Tesla vehicles through the program:

To date, more than 15,000 drivers have rented a Tesla through this program – and they’re making a real impact. Together they’ve completed more than five million fully-electric trips and driven over 40 million electric miles.

The program appears to be a success with driver satisfaction being high.

Uber drivers pay only $334 a week to rent a Tesla Model 3, insurance and maintenance included, and some drivers are reporting over $160 a week in gas savings alone.

Manuel Barros, an Uber driver in Boston and one of the first to take advantage of the Tesla rental program, said:

When I had a gas car, I would spend $25-30 dollars a day [on gasoline]. I’m saving almost $160 a week, if not more, driving an electric vehicle.

On top of the gas savings compensating for the renting cost, Uber gives an extra $1 per trip to drivers of battery-electric vehicles for up to $4,000 per year, and it recently launched the “Comfort Electric” option that pays drivers more when Uber users choose an electric ride.

Uber also reports some interesting statistics, like the fact that 95% of drivers renting a Tesla through Hertz are driving electric on the Uber platform for the first time, and 92% of them say they are considering purchasing an electric vehicle since participating in the program.

Raphael Veira, who drives for Uber in Los Angeles, commented:

I was always curious as to how an electric vehicle could handle the mileage you put on your car when doing Uber. It handles the mileage really well. I want to buy a [Tesla] Model S eventually. And this was a perfect opportunity to see how they drive.

The program for Uber drivers to rent Tesla vehicles through Hertz is now available in the following cities:

  • Atlanta
  • Austin
  • Boston
  • Charlotte
  • Chicago
  • Cleveland
  • Connecticut
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Detroit
  • Houston
  • Jacksonville
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles
  • Miami
  • Minneapolis – St. Paul
  • Nashville
  • New Jersey
  • New Orleans
  • NYC suburbs
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Phoenix
  • Portland
  • Sacramento
  • San Antonio
  • San Diego
  • San Francisco
  • Seattle
  • St Louis
  • Tampa Bay
  • Washington, DC
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(edited)

9 hours ago, Polyphia said:

Per your linked article:

"The rise in primary energy between 2019 and 2021 was entirely driven by renewable energy sources. The level of fossil fuel energy consumption globally remained unchanged between 2019 and 2021, with lower oil demand offset by higher natural gas and coal consumption, according to BP."

This is all about demand for basic oil needs such as transportation, which will continue to pick up. The pandemic and the recent worries over recession will be overcome as the driving season picks up steam soon.

Military spending will also increase demand for oil.

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

8 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

You don't even pay attention to your own claim being disproven by your own  post. How sad. 

No, oil demand has recovered from the dip and will continue upward and onward. That is what the data shows.

Military spending will help that, plus Biden's road-building efforts with all that wonderful asphalt material.

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

8 hours ago, TailingsPond said:

Coal is too expensive.  Not good for coal when its only advantage is being cheap.

Damn coal causing a "severe and protracted power crisis." 

 

Coal is the basic supplier of energy for India, 75%, and all your weeping will not change that.

You can borrow my handkerchief.

Edited by Ecocharger

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7 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

15,000 Tesla vehicles are already in the hands of Uber drivers through Hertz deal

Uber Tesla Comfort electric

 

Last year, Hertz announced an important effort to electrify its fleet of rental cars, led by a massive purchase of 100,000 Tesla Model 3 vehicles to be delivered over the next year.

Shortly after, Hertz announced that on top of adding Tesla vehicles to its rental fleet, the company also made a deal with Uber to offer its drivers access to the Tesla vehicles. 50,000 Tesla vehicles will be offered for rent to Uber drivers, and the company has an option for more if the program is successful.

Today, Andrew Macdonald, Uber’s senior vice president of mobility and business operations, announced that already 15,000 Uber drivers have rented Tesla vehicles through the program:

To date, more than 15,000 drivers have rented a Tesla through this program – and they’re making a real impact. Together they’ve completed more than five million fully-electric trips and driven over 40 million electric miles.

The program appears to be a success with driver satisfaction being high.

Uber drivers pay only $334 a week to rent a Tesla Model 3, insurance and maintenance included, and some drivers are reporting over $160 a week in gas savings alone.

Manuel Barros, an Uber driver in Boston and one of the first to take advantage of the Tesla rental program, said:

When I had a gas car, I would spend $25-30 dollars a day [on gasoline]. I’m saving almost $160 a week, if not more, driving an electric vehicle.

On top of the gas savings compensating for the renting cost, Uber gives an extra $1 per trip to drivers of battery-electric vehicles for up to $4,000 per year, and it recently launched the “Comfort Electric” option that pays drivers more when Uber users choose an electric ride.

Uber also reports some interesting statistics, like the fact that 95% of drivers renting a Tesla through Hertz are driving electric on the Uber platform for the first time, and 92% of them say they are considering purchasing an electric vehicle since participating in the program.

Raphael Veira, who drives for Uber in Los Angeles, commented:

I was always curious as to how an electric vehicle could handle the mileage you put on your car when doing Uber. It handles the mileage really well. I want to buy a [Tesla] Model S eventually. And this was a perfect opportunity to see how they drive.

The program for Uber drivers to rent Tesla vehicles through Hertz is now available in the following cities:

  • Atlanta
  • Austin
  • Boston
  • Charlotte
  • Chicago
  • Cleveland
  • Connecticut
  • Dallas
  • Denver
  • Detroit
  • Houston
  • Jacksonville
  • Las Vegas
  • Los Angeles
  • Miami
  • Minneapolis – St. Paul
  • Nashville
  • New Jersey
  • New Orleans
  • NYC suburbs
  • Orlando
  • Philadelphia
  • Phoenix
  • Portland
  • Sacramento
  • San Antonio
  • San Diego
  • San Francisco
  • Seattle
  • St Louis
  • Tampa Bay
  • Washington, DC

Even a tiny little electric bug has to get all decked out in a loud attempt to advertise and propagandize...the electric crowd must really be desperate.

I could not fit my stuff into a golf cart like this.

I would prefer a Mustang.

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(edited)

Here is where oil is going....upward and higher.

The driving season is about to begin.

https://oilprice.com/Latest-Energy-News/World-News/Oil-Rises-Further-As-API-Reports-Large-Crude-Draw.html

"U.S. crude inventories have shed some 71 million barrels since the start of 2021 and about 15 million barrels since the start of 2020, according to API data."

And this,

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Oil-Markets-Could-Face-A-Doomsday-Scenario-This-Week.html

"There is still some optimism in markets about a real demand-supply crunch, as high inflation levels and a possible global economic slowdown could lead to lower demand. Until now, however, that optimism has not materialized at all, demand is still increasing, even though gasoline and diesel prices are breaking historical price levels. The re-opening of the Chinese economy, a natural gas shortage globally, and higher temperatures in the coming weeks, combined with the normal peak in demand due to the US and EU driving season, all look set to push oil prices higher."

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

15 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Here is where oil is going....upward and higher.

Your whole argument against EVs is rising lithium prices then oddly think rising oil prices is a good thing for ICE.

You can't have it both ways.  Pick one.

Edited by TailingsPond
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8 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

I could not fit my stuff into a golf cart like this.

 

8 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

I could not fit my stuff into a golf cart like this.

I would prefer a Mustang.

A Ford Mustang has 408 litres (13.5 cubic feet) of storage space, compared with 425 litres (15 cubic feet) in the Tesla Model 3.

I guess you'll be buying the Tesla next Eco 🤣

 

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(edited)

3 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

 

A Ford Mustang has 408 litres (13.5 cubic feet) of storage space, compared with 425 litres (15 cubic feet) in the Tesla Model 3.

I guess you'll be buying the Tesla next Eco 🤣

 

Mustang has more comfortable ride, easier access to refueling, EV is still not a competitive product. 

Mustang storage space is very accessible and handy, and the back seats are very useful for additional space for luggage.

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

When the wind stops blowing, renewable energy fails.

https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/dearth-of-wind-power-risks-exacerbating-germany-s-energy-crisis-1.1785429

"Little wind in Germany is worsening the energy crisis in Europe’s biggest economy and risking driving prices even higher. 

The nation has the region’s biggest wind power capacity, but calm weather forecast to last into the first week of July means that actual output will remain very low. The day-ahead power contract advanced more than 3% on Wednesday to near the highest level since March. 

Germany relies more than most nations in the region on renewables and when the wind doesn’t blow or it’s cloudy, prices rise as more expensive coal and gas plants need to be switched on. The slump in wind generation coincides with lower gas flows from Russia, which has sent prices for the fuel rallying again after a lull earlier in the month. "

 

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

2 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Mustang has more comfortable ride, easier access to refueling, EV is still not a competitive product. 

Mustang storage space is very accessible and handy, and the back seats are very useful for additional space for luggage.

So you apparently have a gas pump in your garage and find accessing the backseat in a two door car easier than in a four door car. Not sure where Rob got his Model 3 cargo data but according to Tesla it is actually 22.9 cubic feet compared to the Mustang's 13.5. The EPA interior volume in a Model 3 is 112 cubic feet but only 96 in a Mustang. Oh and the Model 3 outsells the Mustang by over an order of magnitude. I think your problem is that you still aren't competitive.

image.thumb.png.9eee2abb73b1122d4d784a59658dc7cf.png

https://www.tesla.com/ownersmanual/model3/en_us/GUID-56562137-FC31-4110-A13C-9A9FC6657BF0.html

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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(edited)

2 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

So you apparently have a gas pump in your garage and find accessing the backseat in a two door car easier than in a four door car. Not sure where Rob got his Model 3 cargo data but according to Tesla it is actually 22.9 cubic feet compared to the Mustang's 13.5. The EPA interior volume in a Model 3 is 112 cubic feet but only 96 in a Mustang. Oh and the Model 3 outsells the Mustang by over an order of magnitude. I think your problem is that you still aren't competitive.

image.thumb.png.9eee2abb73b1122d4d784a59658dc7cf.png

https://www.tesla.com/ownersmanual/model3/en_us/GUID-56562137-FC31-4110-A13C-9A9FC6657BF0.html

I value comfort. A better ride is important for long distance travel.

Travel luggage fits well into the Mustang.

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

The problems of going Green,

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Bidens-Green-Energy-Policy-May-End-In-Tears.html

"“It costs Germany a great deal to maintain such an excess of installed power,” the IEEE report stated. “The average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000.”

A major problem with wind and solar is not only that they are unreliable, but also that they tend to generate the most power when people need it least. The peak seasons for wind generation tend to be fall and spring, but the peak demand for energy occurs in summer and winter when people need to heat or cool homes and offices.

An electricity grid must manage huge variability in demand. It must have enough capacity to cover peak demand, for example during the hottest hours of summer, but also have the flexibility to reduce power during early morning hours or springtime days when demand falls considerably. Because renewables are unpredictable in terms of how much energy they will produce, and when, they add substantial variability to the supply side of the equation as well.

“The whole idea that you would take something as complicated as an electric system, one of the most complicated things people have invented to date, and choose what to put on that system and how to run it by a popularity contest, to me that’s nuts and it’s going to end in tears,” Peter Hartley, Professor of Energy Economics at Rice University, told The Epoch Times. “Trying to run that system with politics is not a very smart thing to do.”"

Edited by Ecocharger

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(edited)

On 6/28/2022 at 3:18 PM, TailingsPond said:

Coal is too expensive.  Not good for coal when its only advantage is being cheap.

Damn coal causing a "severe and protracted power crisis." 

 

Coal varies in price, but will be needed to support any energy system, it is essential.

75% of India's energy supply.

Edited by Ecocharger

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14 hours ago, TailingsPond said:

Your whole argument against EVs is rising lithium prices then oddly think rising oil prices is a good thing for ICE.

You can't have it both ways.  Pick one.

Oil prices still out-compete rising lithium prices, which will soon prevent average Americans from buying EVs.

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36 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

I value comfort. A better ride is important for long distance travel.

Travel luggage fits well into the Mustang.

Travel luggage fits better in the much roomier Model 3 and the ride of a Mustang is nothing to get excited about. They are both performance cars with performance suspension. 

Comfort mode is the softest setting, and the Mustang rides reasonably well, although potholes and other large road irregularities can unsettle the car and thump through into the interior.

the 10-speed automatic can be a bit frustrating. It often flicks through multiple gears in one go, and has a habit of switching ratios indecisively, before lurching into gear when it finally makes up its mind. https://www.whatcar.com/ford/mustang/coupe/review/n17149

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US electric vehicle jobs exploded in 2021, clean energy jobs grew – and fossil fuel jobs shrunk

The US Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2022 US Energy and Employment Report (USEER), which reveals that 2021 saw electric vehicle jobs increase by a whopping 26.2%, or 21,961, new jobs.

 

US electric vehicle jobs led 2021 energy sector growth

The 2022 USEER report shows that the energy sector – with the exception of fossil fuels – experienced positive job growth. Overall, the sector rose by 4% from 2020 to 2021, outpacing overall US employment, which grew 2.8% in the same period. The energy sector added more than 300,000 jobs, increasing the total number of energy jobs from 7.5 million in 2020 to more than 7.8 million in 2021.

In addition to the huge job growth in the full battery electric vehicle sector mentioned above, other vehicle sectors saw notable job growth as well:

  • Hybrid electric vehicle jobs increased 19.7%, adding 23,577 new jobs.
  • Plug-in hybrid vehicle jobs increased 30.9%, adding 14,790 jobs.
  • Hydrogen fuel cell jobs increased 41.4%, adding 4,160 jobs.

Fossil fuel jobs accounted for most of the fuel jobs lost:

  • Petroleum – both onshore and offshore – led losses with a decrease of 6.4%, shedding 31,593 jobs.
  • Coal fuel jobs declined by the greatest percentage, at 11.8%, losing 7,125 jobs.
  • Fuel extraction jobs overall decreased by 12%.

But, biofuels, including renewable diesel fuels, biodiesel fuels, and waste fuels, grew by 6.7%, adding 1,180 jobs.

When it came to electric power generation, renewables grew, and fossil fuel energy for electric power generation jobs either declined or grew at a slower pace than renewable energy jobs:

  • Coal power generation jobs decreased by 572 from 2020 to 2021, down 0.8%.
  • Natural gas and petroleum grew at slower rates (1.6% and 0.5%, respectively) than overall U.S. employment (2.8%).
  • Nuclear dropped 4.2%, losing 2,440 jobs.
  • Batteries jumped 4.4% with 2,949 jobs.
  • Smart grids increased 4.9% to 1,136 jobs.
  • Solar energy jobs increased by 5.4%, adding 17,212 new jobs.
  • Wind energy jobs increased by 2.9%, adding 3,347 new jobs.
  • Energy efficiency jobs increased by 2.7%, adding 57,741 new jobs.

Sierra Club Director of Labor and Economic Justice Program Derrick Figures issued the following statement in response to the report’s findings:

Time and again, we’re reminded of the near limitless potential of the clean energy industry – potential that will only be realized by bold investments that ensures equitable growth. Today’s Department of Energy report is perhaps the most detailed reminder yet of what this sector could become when Congress passes bold investments in clean energy.

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4 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Travel luggage fits better in the much roomier Model 3 and the ride of a Mustang is nothing to get excited about. They are both performance cars with performance suspension. 

Comfort mode is the softest setting, and the Mustang rides reasonably well, although potholes and other large road irregularities can unsettle the car and thump through into the interior.

the 10-speed automatic can be a bit frustrating. It often flicks through multiple gears in one go, and has a habit of switching ratios indecisively, before lurching into gear when it finally makes up its mind. https://www.whatcar.com/ford/mustang/coupe/review/n17149

Outstanding ride quality for the money...very affordable.

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(edited)

5 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

US electric vehicle jobs exploded in 2021, clean energy jobs grew – and fossil fuel jobs shrunk

The US Department of Energy (DOE) today released the 2022 US Energy and Employment Report (USEER), which reveals that 2021 saw electric vehicle jobs increase by a whopping 26.2%, or 21,961, new jobs.

 

US electric vehicle jobs led 2021 energy sector growth

The 2022 USEER report shows that the energy sector – with the exception of fossil fuels – experienced positive job growth. Overall, the sector rose by 4% from 2020 to 2021, outpacing overall US employment, which grew 2.8% in the same period. The energy sector added more than 300,000 jobs, increasing the total number of energy jobs from 7.5 million in 2020 to more than 7.8 million in 2021.

In addition to the huge job growth in the full battery electric vehicle sector mentioned above, other vehicle sectors saw notable job growth as well:

  • Hybrid electric vehicle jobs increased 19.7%, adding 23,577 new jobs.
  • Plug-in hybrid vehicle jobs increased 30.9%, adding 14,790 jobs.
  • Hydrogen fuel cell jobs increased 41.4%, adding 4,160 jobs.

Fossil fuel jobs accounted for most of the fuel jobs lost:

  • Petroleum – both onshore and offshore – led losses with a decrease of 6.4%, shedding 31,593 jobs.
  • Coal fuel jobs declined by the greatest percentage, at 11.8%, losing 7,125 jobs.
  • Fuel extraction jobs overall decreased by 12%.

But, biofuels, including renewable diesel fuels, biodiesel fuels, and waste fuels, grew by 6.7%, adding 1,180 jobs.

When it came to electric power generation, renewables grew, and fossil fuel energy for electric power generation jobs either declined or grew at a slower pace than renewable energy jobs:

  • Coal power generation jobs decreased by 572 from 2020 to 2021, down 0.8%.
  • Natural gas and petroleum grew at slower rates (1.6% and 0.5%, respectively) than overall U.S. employment (2.8%).
  • Nuclear dropped 4.2%, losing 2,440 jobs.
  • Batteries jumped 4.4% with 2,949 jobs.
  • Smart grids increased 4.9% to 1,136 jobs.
  • Solar energy jobs increased by 5.4%, adding 17,212 new jobs.
  • Wind energy jobs increased by 2.9%, adding 3,347 new jobs.
  • Energy efficiency jobs increased by 2.7%, adding 57,741 new jobs.

Sierra Club Director of Labor and Economic Justice Program Derrick Figures issued the following statement in response to the report’s findings:

Time and again, we’re reminded of the near limitless potential of the clean energy industry – potential that will only be realized by bold investments that ensures equitable growth. Today’s Department of Energy report is perhaps the most detailed reminder yet of what this sector could become when Congress passes bold investments in clean energy.

Less than 1% of the American vehicle fleet.

Systemic problems,

"“It costs Germany a great deal to maintain such an excess of installed power,” the IEEE report stated. “The average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000.”

A major problem with wind and solar is not only that they are unreliable, but also that they tend to generate the most power when people need it least. The peak seasons for wind generation tend to be fall and spring, but the peak demand for energy occurs in summer and winter when people need to heat or cool homes and offices."

But no problem, coal will ride to the rescue.

Thanks, Jay.

Edited by Ecocharger

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52 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

The problems of going Green,

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Bidens-Green-Energy-Policy-May-End-In-Tears.html

"“It costs Germany a great deal to maintain such an excess of installed power,” the IEEE report stated. “The average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000.”

A major problem with wind and solar is not only that they are unreliable, but also that they tend to generate the most power when people need it least. The peak seasons for wind generation tend to be fall and spring, but the peak demand for energy occurs in summer and winter when people need to heat or cool homes and offices.

An electricity grid must manage huge variability in demand. It must have enough capacity to cover peak demand, for example during the hottest hours of summer, but also have the flexibility to reduce power during early morning hours or springtime days when demand falls considerably. Because renewables are unpredictable in terms of how much energy they will produce, and when, they add substantial variability to the supply side of the equation as well.

“The whole idea that you would take something as complicated as an electric system, one of the most complicated things people have invented to date, and choose what to put on that system and how to run it by a popularity contest, to me that’s nuts and it’s going to end in tears,” Peter Hartley, Professor of Energy Economics at Rice University, told The Epoch Times. “Trying to run that system with politics is not a very smart thing to do.”"

Another incredibly compelling article from ZeroHedge. It really isn't the flex you think it is.

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(edited)

3 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

The problems of going Green,

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Bidens-Green-Energy-Policy-May-End-In-Tears.html

"“It costs Germany a great deal to maintain such an excess of installed power,” the IEEE report stated. “The average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000.”

A major problem with wind and solar is not only that they are unreliable, but also that they tend to generate the most power when people need it least. The peak seasons for wind generation tend to be fall and spring, but the peak demand for energy occurs in summer and winter when people need to heat or cool homes and offices.

An electricity grid must manage huge variability in demand. It must have enough capacity to cover peak demand, for example during the hottest hours of summer, but also have the flexibility to reduce power during early morning hours or springtime days when demand falls considerably. Because renewables are unpredictable in terms of how much energy they will produce, and when, they add substantial variability to the supply side of the equation as well.

“The whole idea that you would take something as complicated as an electric system, one of the most complicated things people have invented to date, and choose what to put on that system and how to run it by a popularity contest, to me that’s nuts and it’s going to end in tears,” Peter Hartley, Professor of Energy Economics at Rice University, told The Epoch Times. “Trying to run that system with politics is not a very smart thing to do.”"

From your lying zerohedge article "The Biden administration has chosen to follow Germany, providing heavy subsidies for wind and solar," The Biden administration has in fact provided zero subsidies for wind and solar. To the contrary, the onshore wind subsidy in fact ended last year and the solar subsidy has continued to step down.

As to your quote from it, that is what storage is for. Moreover reducing power is as simple as pushing a button to turn the renewables off. It is called curtailment.  It would be stunning if you could post something that wasn't complete crap.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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15 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

Less than 1% of the American vehicle fleet.

Systemic problems,

"“It costs Germany a great deal to maintain such an excess of installed power,” the IEEE report stated. “The average cost of electricity for German households has doubled since 2000.”

A major problem with wind and solar is not only that they are unreliable, but also that they tend to generate the most power when people need it least. The peak seasons for wind generation tend to be fall and spring, but the peak demand for energy occurs in summer and winter when people need to heat or cool homes and offices."

More lying crap. The costs are up because the cost of coal and natural gas are through the roof. If it weren't for renewables the average cost would have tripled. 

It can be easily shown with these graphs. Renewables have barely changed in the past year but the price of coal and natural gas have skyrocketed over that time period. Note the correlation between all three costs. Electricity started going up the exact same month gas and coal started going up. If you were a real economist you would look at the real data before posting such lies.

image.thumb.png.a0063ae4eaa0a4d15fb9ec5344f667a5.png

image.png.d758893e5815721631bdb15803c4d16b.png

image.png.4871f63b7bbdcee9c7e1795c6c076f64.png

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1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

Outstanding ride quality for the money...very affordable.

Affordable until you start adding up all the fuel and maintenance cost. 

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(edited)

 

5 hours ago, Ecocharger said:

Less than 1% of the American vehicle fleet.

 

The total number of light duty registered vehicles in America is 253 million.

image.png.5d0623ce6dd6d328251353915b9f09b7.png

 

And the cumulative sales of EVs has just reached 2.7 million. EVs have crossed that 1% of the fleet threshold .

Figure 2 Cumulative U.S. Plug-In Vehicle Sales

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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