JM

GREEN NEW DEAL = BLIZZARD OF LIES

Recommended Posts

(edited)

9 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Nope, closing the Dakota Access Pipeline had nothing to do with the Clean Air Act.

You Jay are clueless, often you utter the word capitulation. Green energy has just been nuked! This Clean Air Act has been invalidated. Things of this nature are extreme the pendulum has swung sharply...perhaps to sharply in a sense.

https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/30/us-supreme-court-says-epa-cant-regulate-carbon-pollution-under-clean-air-act/

In a move that by now surprises absolutely no one, the U.S. Supreme Court today ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not have the authority to regulate carbon pollution from existing power plants.

The 6-3 decision, with the three liberal justices dissenting, makes it increasingly likely that an act of Congress will be required to create regulations to rein in planet-warming emissions.

Edited by Eyes Wide Open
  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

You Jay are clueless, often you utter the word capitulation. Green energy has just been nuked! This Clean Air Act has been invalidated. Things of this nature are extreme the pendulum has swung sharply.

https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/30/us-supreme-court-says-epa-cant-regulate-carbon-pollution-under-clean-air-act/

That oil pipeline wasn't shutdown because of carbon. Green energy is doing just fine and the people want clean air so this is going to backfire on you. Green energy is less expensive than fossil so it is going to win. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

That oil pipeline wasn't shutdown because of carbon. Green energy is doing just fine and the people want clean air so this is going to backfire on you. Green energy is less expensive than fossil so it is going to win. 

It is quite apparent you are very new to energy production in this country. Carbon production seriously? Watch listen and learn, a good example would be coal plant power generation. Only a state can now govern such issues, the fed no longer plays such a role. Federal courts are now meaningless...Ahh the Kracken Wakes!

  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

It is quite apparent you are very new to energy production in this country. Carbon production seriously? Watch listen and learn, a good example would be coal plant power generation. Only a state can now govern such issues, the fed no longer plays such a role. Federal courts are now meaningless...Ahh the Kracken Wakes!

No the economy governs such issues. Coal is expensive and is continuing its death spiral. Enjoy watching and learning about our energy market as EVs, solar and wind just keep increasing while fossil fuels decline.

But the fundamental economic pressures pushing coal out of the U.S. electricity mix remain unchanged – 80% of existing coal plants across the country cost more to continue running than replacing them with new local wind or solar generation. Plant closure announcements have resumed their march to zero, with the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reporting 12.6 GW of coal capacity will close in 2022, representing 85% of all electric generation capacity retirements this year.

Coal’s outlook is even more grim over the next several years. S&P Global Market Intelligence reports utilities will close 51 GW of coal power between 2022 and 2027, followed by a “record plunge” in 2028 with more than 23 GW scheduled closures. Federal rules to keep coal ash and toxic metals out of drinking water will take effect that year – regardless of Supreme Court decisions on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions – and many utilities are not investing in compliance upgrades for plants that keep losing money.

When utilities ignore coal’s economic and regulatory headwinds, they risk punitive consumer cost spikes. In West Virginia, where coal supplies 89% of statewide power but plants require hundreds of millions in mandatory upgrades, power prices have risen up to 122% in recent years.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/energyinnovation/2022/03/15/so-much-for-coals-rebound-plant-closures-come-roaring-back-smart-policy-must-unlock-a-just-transition/?sh=60e2b1c74e91

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

No the economy governs such issues. Coal is expensive and is continuing its death spiral. Enjoy watching and learning about our energy market as EVs, solar and wind just keep increasing while fossil fuels decline.

But the fundamental economic pressures pushing coal out of the U.S. electricity mix remain unchanged – 80% of existing coal plants across the country cost more to continue running than replacing them with new local wind or solar generation. Plant closure announcements have resumed their march to zero, with the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reporting 12.6 GW of coal capacity will close in 2022, representing 85% of all electric generation capacity retirements this year.

Coal’s outlook is even more grim over the next several years. S&P Global Market Intelligence reports utilities will close 51 GW of coal power between 2022 and 2027, followed by a “record plunge” in 2028 with more than 23 GW scheduled closures. Federal rules to keep coal ash and toxic metals out of drinking water will take effect that year – regardless of Supreme Court decisions on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions – and many utilities are not investing in compliance upgrades for plants that keep losing money.

When utilities ignore coal’s economic and regulatory headwinds, they risk punitive consumer cost spikes. In West Virginia, where coal supplies 89% of statewide power but plants require hundreds of millions in mandatory upgrades, power prices have risen up to 122% in recent years.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/energyinnovation/2022/03/15/so-much-for-coals-rebound-plant-closures-come-roaring-back-smart-policy-must-unlock-a-just-transition/?sh=60e2b1c74e91

 

tumblr_24b0f37ee91017e95967f88ba03e1ff2_b7d71a2a_400.gif

  • Rolling Eye 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

2 hours ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

 Only a state can now govern such issues, the fed no longer plays such a role. Federal courts are now meaningless...Ahh the Kracken Wakes!

Divided states of embarrassment right now (Roe v Wade).

 

Edited by TailingsPond

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Global plugin vehicle registrations were up 55% in May 2022 compared to May 2021. With the China covid lockdown effects easing, sales have recovered most of their previous pace, reaching 699,000 registrations last month. That represents 12% share of the overall auto market (8.6% BEV share).

https://cleantechnica.com/2022/06/29/electric-car-sales-global-top-20/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

That oil pipeline wasn't shutdown because of carbon. Green energy is doing just fine and the people want clean air so this is going to backfire on you. Green energy is less expensive than fossil so it is going to win. 

How many registered motor vehicles are there in the U.S.?

 Some 276 million vehicles were registered here in 2020. The figures include passenger cars, motorcycles, trucks, buses, and other vehicles. The number of light trucks sold in the U.S. stood at 11 million units in 2020.

276 million.....

As of 2020, nearly 1.8 million EVs were registered in the U.S., more than three times as many as in 2016, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

1.8 million.....

Its game over.....The Best Is Yet To Come!

 

https://www.statista.com/statistics/183505/number-of-vehicles-in-the-united-states-since-1990/

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/07/todays-electric-vehicle-market-slow-growth-in-u-s-faster-in-china-europe/

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

1 hour ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

How many registered motor vehicles are there in the U.S.?

 Some 276 million vehicles were registered here in 2020. The figures include passenger cars, motorcycles, trucks, buses, and other vehicles. The number of light trucks sold in the U.S. stood at 11 million units in 2020.

276 million.....

As of 2020, nearly 1.8 million EVs were registered in the U.S., more than three times as many as in 2016, according to the International Energy Agency (IEA).

1.8 million.....

Its game over.....The Best Is Yet To Come!

 

https://www.statista.com/statistics/183505/number-of-vehicles-in-the-united-states-since-1990/

https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2021/06/07/todays-electric-vehicle-market-slow-growth-in-u-s-faster-in-china-europe/

 

 

EVs are just getting going and are growing at an exponential rate. Moore's law is 42% CAGR but EVs are growing at 45.5%. Enjoy watching EV sales just get bigger and bigger.

Plug-In Vehicle Sales

A total of 73,608 plug-in vehicles (57,804 BEVs and 15,804 PHEVs) were sold during May 2022 in the United States, up 45.5% from the sales in May 2021. PEVs captured 6.66% of total LDV sales this month.

https://www.anl.gov/es/light-duty-electric-drive-vehicles-monthly-sales-updates

EVs are now at 2.7 million:

Figure 2 Cumulative U.S. Plug-In Vehicle Sales

Figure 3 PEV Sales Share of New Vehicle Sales

 

Edited by Jay McKinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

28 minutes ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

https://www.energy.gov/timeline/timeline-history-electric-car

Not an invention of modern times, the electric car has a long and storied history. Travel back in time as we explore the history of the electric car. 

haha Enjoy the lithium-ion EV revolution.

History of the lithium-ion battery

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
 
 
220px-Lithium-Ionen-Accumulator.jpg
 
Varta lithium-ion battery, Museum Autovision, Altlussheim, Germany

This is a history of the lithium-ion battery.

Prior work[edit]

Much of the basic research that led to the development of the intercalation compounds that form the core of lithium-ion batteries was carried out in the 1960s by Robert Huggins and Carl Wagner, who studied the movement of ions in solids.[1] Reversible intercalation of lithium ions into graphite as anodes[2][3][4] and intercalation of lithium ions into cathodic oxide as cathodes[4][5][6] was discovered during 1974–76 by Jürgen Otto Besenhard at TU Munich. Besenhard proposed its application in lithium cells.[7][8] Electrolyte decomposition and solvent co-intercalation into graphite were severe early drawbacks for battery life.

British chemist M. Stanley Whittingham, then a researcher at ExxonMobil, first reported a rechargeable lithium-ion battery (a precursor to modern lithium-ion batteries) in the 1970s.[4] Drawing on previous research from his time at Stanford University,[9] he used a layered titanium(IV) sulfide as cathode and lithium metal as anode.[4][10] However, this setup proved impractical. Titanium disulfide was expensive (~$1,000 per kilogram in the 1970s) and difficult to work with, since it has to be synthesized under completely oxygen and moisture-free conditions. When exposed to air, it reacts to form hydrogen sulfide compounds, which have an unpleasant odour and are toxic to humans and most animals. For this, and other reasons, Exxon discontinued development of Whittingham's lithium-titanium disulfide battery.[1]

Batteries with metallic lithium electrodes presented safety issues, as lithium metal reacts with water, releasing flammable hydrogen gas.[11] Consequently, research moved to develop batteries in which, instead of metallic lithium, only lithium compounds are present, being capable of accepting and releasing lithium ions.

Development[edit]

  • 1973: Adam Heller proposed the lithium thionyl chloride battery, still used in implanted medical devices and in defense systems where a greater than 20-year shelf life, high energy density, and/or tolerance for extreme operating temperatures are required.[12]
  • 1977: Samar Basu et al demonstrated irreversible intercalation of lithium in graphite at the University of Pennsylvania.[13][14] This led to the development of a workable lithium intercalated graphite electrode at Bell Labs in 1984 (LiC
    6
    )[15] to provide an alternative to the lithium metal electrode battery. However it was only a molten salt cell battery rather than a lithium ion battery.
  • 1979: Working in separate groups, Ned A. Godshall et al.,[16][17][18] and, shortly thereafter, John B. Goodenough (Oxford University) and Koichi Mizushima (Tokyo University), demonstrated a rechargeable lithium cell with voltage in the 4 V range using lithium cobalt dioxide (LiCoO
    2
    ) as the positive electrode and lithium metal as the negative electrode.[19][20] This innovation provided the positive electrode material that enabled early commercial lithium batteries. LiCoO
    2
     is a stable positive electrode material which acts as a donor of lithium ions, which means that it can be used with a negative electrode material other than lithium metal.[21] By enabling the use of stable and easy-to-handle negative electrode materials, LiCoO
    2
     enabled novel rechargeable battery systems. Godshall et al. further identified the similar value of ternary compound lithium-transition metal-oxides such as the spinel LiMn2O4, Li2MnO3, LiMnO2, LiFeO2, LiFe5O8, and LiFe5O4 (and later lithium-copper-oxide and lithium-nickel-oxide cathode materials in 1985)[22]
  • 1980: Rachid Yazami demonstrated the reversible electrochemical intercalation of lithium in graphite,[23][24] and invented the lithium graphite electrode (anode).[25][26] The organic electrolytes available at the time would decompose during charging with a graphite negative electrode. Yazami used a solid electrolyte to demonstrate that lithium could be reversibly intercalated in graphite through an electrochemical mechanism. As of 2011, Yazami's graphite electrode was the most commonly used electrode in commercial lithium-ion batteries.
  • The negative electrode has its origins in PAS (polyacenic semiconductive material) discovered by Tokio Yamabe and later by Shjzukuni Yata in the early 1980s.[27][28][29][30] The seed of this technology was the discovery of conductive polymers by Professor Hideki Shirakawa and his group, and it could also be seen as having started from the polyacetylene lithium ion battery developed by Alan MacDiarmid and Alan J. Heeger et al.[31]
  • 1982: Godshall et al. were awarded U.S. Patent 4,340,652[32] for the use of LiCoO2 as cathodes in lithium batteries, based on Godshall's Stanford University Ph.D. dissertation and 1979 publications.
  • 1983: Michael M. Thackeray, Peter Bruce, William David, and John B. Goodenough developed manganese spinel, Mn2O4, as a charged cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. It has two flat plateaus on discharge with lithium one at 4V, stoichiometry LiMn2O4, and one at 3V with a final stoichiometry of Li2Mn2O4.[33]
  • 1985: Akira Yoshino assembled a prototype cell using carbonaceous material into which lithium ions could be inserted as one electrode, and lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO
    2
    ) as the other.[34] This dramatically improved safety. LiCoO
    2
     enabled industrial-scale production and enabled the commercial lithium-ion battery.
  • 1989: Arumugam Manthiram and John B. Goodenough discovered the polyanion class of cathodes.[35][36] They showed that positive electrodes containing polyanions, e.g., sulfates, produce higher voltages than oxides due to the inductive effect of the polyanion. This polyanion class contains materials such as lithium iron phosphate.[37]
  • 1990: Jeff Dahn and two colleagues at Dalhousie University reported reversible intercalation of lithium ions into graphite in the presence of ethylene carbonate solvent, thus finding the final piece of the puzzle leading to the modern lithium-ion battery.[38]

Commercialization and advances[edit]

The performance and capacity of lithium-ion batteries increased as development progressed.

  • 1991: Sony and Asahi Kasei released the first commercial lithium-ion battery.[39] The Japanese team that successfully commercialized the technology was led by Yoshio Nishi.[40]
  • 1996: Goodenough, Akshaya Padhi and coworkers proposed lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO
    4
    ) and other phospho-olivines (lithium metal phosphates with the same structure as mineral olivine) as positive electrode materials.[41][42]
  • 1998: C. S. Johnson, J. T. Vaughey, M. M. Thackeray, T. E. Bofinger, and S. A. Hackney report the discovery of the high capacity high voltage lithium-rich NMC cathode materials.[43]
  • 2001: Arumugam Manthiram and co-workers discovered that the capacity limitations of layered oxide cathodes is a result of chemical instability that can be understood based on the relative positions of the metal 3d band relative to the top of the oxygen 2p band.[44][45][46] This discovery has had significant implications for the practically accessible compositional space of lithium ion battery layered oxide cathodes, as well as their stability from a safety perspective.
  • 2001: Christopher Johnson, Michael Thackeray, Khalil Amine, and Jaekook Kim file a patent[47][48] for lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) lithium rich cathodes based on a domain structure.
  • 2001: Zhonghua Lu and Jeff Dahn file a patent[49] for the NMC class of positive electrode materials, which offers safety and energy density improvements over the widely used lithium cobalt oxide.
  • 2002: Yet-Ming Chiang and his group at MIT showed a substantial improvement in the performance of lithium batteries by boosting the material's conductivity by doping it[50] with aluminium, niobium and zirconium. The exact mechanism causing the increase became the subject of widespread debate.[51]
  • 2004: Yet-Ming Chiang again increased performance by utilizing lithium iron phosphate particles of less than 100 nanometers in diameter. This decreased particle density almost one hundredfold, increased the positive electrode's surface area and improved capacity and performance. Commercialization led to a rapid growth in the market for higher capacity lithium-ion batteries, as well as a patent infringement battle between Chiang and John Goodenough.[51]
  • 2005: Y Song, PY Zavalij, and M. Stanley Whittingham report a new two-electron vanadium phosphate cathode material with high energy density[52][53]
  • 2011: Lithium nickel manganese cobalt oxide (NMC) cathodes, developed at Argonne National Laboratory, are manufactured commercially by BASF in Ohio.[54]
  • 2011: Lithium-ion batteries accounted for 66% of all portable secondary (i.e., rechargeable) battery sales in Japan.[55]
  • 2012: John Goodenough, Rachid Yazami and Akira Yoshino received the 2012 IEEE Medal for Environmental and Safety Technologies for developing the lithium ion battery.[26]
  • 2014: John Goodenough, Yoshio Nishi, Rachid Yazami and Akira Yoshino were awarded the Charles Stark Draper Prize of the National Academy of Engineering for their pioneering efforts in the field.[56]
  • 2014: Commercial batteries from Amprius Corp. reached 650 Wh/L (a 20% increase), using a silicon anode and were delivered to customers.[57]
  • 2016: Koichi Mizushima and Akira Yoshino received the NIMS Award from the National Institute for Materials Science, for Mizushima's discovery of the LiCoO2 cathode material for the lithium-ion battery and Yoshino's development of the lithium-ion battery.[58]
  • 2016: Z. Qi, and Gary Koenig reported a scalable method to produce sub-micrometer sized LiCoO
    2
     using a template-based approach.[59]
  • 2019: The Nobel Prize in Chemistry was given to John Goodenough, Stanley Whittingham and Akira Yoshino "for the development of lithium ion batteries".[60]
Edited by Jay McKinsey

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

You Jay are clueless, often you utter the word capitulation. Green energy has just been nuked! This Clean Air Act has been invalidated. Things of this nature are extreme the pendulum has swung sharply...perhaps to sharply in a sense.

https://techcrunch.com/2022/06/30/us-supreme-court-says-epa-cant-regulate-carbon-pollution-under-clean-air-act/

In a move that by now surprises absolutely no one, the U.S. Supreme Court today ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not have the authority to regulate carbon pollution from existing power plants.

The 6-3 decision, with the three liberal justices dissenting, makes it increasingly likely that an act of Congress will be required to create regulations to rein in planet-warming emissions.

So the SCOTUS gonna force citizens to pay $8 for nat gas while solar runs $2? Even a Russian loses to solar. Lol

 

 

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Rob Plant said:

I'm all for comfort especially on long distances but the question i have to ask is have you ever driven a Tesla over a long distance so you can compare the two?

I have no interest in EVs, the cost and inconvenience is overwhelming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Global plugin vehicle registrations were up 55% in May 2022 compared to May 2021. With the China covid lockdown effects easing, sales have recovered most of their previous pace, reaching 699,000 registrations last month. That represents 12% share of the overall auto market (8.6% BEV share).

https://cleantechnica.com/2022/06/29/electric-car-sales-global-top-20/

Not 12%, less than 1% of the total vehicle market.

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

The Green Revolution is now over.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Supreme-Court-Kills-Climate-Rules.html

"Supreme court ruling is a blow to Biden's plan to decarbonize power grid.

The Supreme Court’s decision today effectively overturns the court’s prior policy of judicial restraint.

The narrow takeaway from today’s ruling is that the Supreme Court has made it extremely difficult for the federal government to regulate CO2 emissions."

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 6/29/2022 at 9:35 PM, Ecocharger said:

Still more affordable, you cannot find a charge on a long trip.

Still more affordable???? looks like the US finds the gasoline price today less affordable at the same time EV sales are booming....

Peak Oil has already happened........Please tells us more about $5 gasoline

 

Gasoline

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

12 hours ago, Boat said:

So the SCOTUS gonna force citizens to pay $8 for nat gas while solar runs $2? Even a Russian loses to solar. Lol

 

 

 

In your adventure of being woken i might suggest a quick stop on the topic of the 3 branches of US governing bodies. 

 A in-depth look at the role of the court's, you will find they only play the role of what is constitutionality legal. Such things as policies&law that directly  effect the functions of the US and it's citizen's.  

No more no less...personal opinions are irrelevant....absolutely meaningless. They lack the depth to guide a society.

Edited by Eyes Wide Open
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

In your adventure of being woken i might suggest a quick stop on the topic of the 3 branches of US governing bodies. 

 A in-depth look at the role of the court's, you will find they only play the role of what is constitutionality legal. Such things as policies&law that directly  effect the functions of the US and it's citizen's.  

No more no less...personal opinions are irrelevant....absolutely meaningless. They lack the depth to guide a society.

If that is so then how is it possible that today's court overruled their previous decisions, several of them? That would mean that the Supreme Court was ether unconstitutional in the past or it is today. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

11 hours ago, notsonice said:

Still more affordable???? looks like the US finds the gasoline price today less affordable at the same time EV sales are booming....

Peak Oil has already happened........Please tells us more about $5 gasoline

 

Gasoline

Peak oil is a long way off, with Biden & Co. losing a court ruling on regulatory powers.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Supply-Disruptions-Drive-Bullish-Sentiment-In-Oil-Markets.html

"As uncertainty builds around the supply capacity of OPEC+ and oil demand rages on despite expectations of demand destruction, bullish sentiment is building in oil markets. Now, to add to that bullish sentiment, another form of supply disruption is springing up around the world: strikes. Operations at France’s Fos Refinery were halted by strikes and Norway’s offshore production was heavily impacted by them as well. It seems the oil market is under siege from all sides, from fundamental tightness to underinvestment, disruptions related to the war in Ukraine, and now strikes. 

OPEC+ Summit Fails to Impress. OPEC+ agreed to maintain a 648,000 b/d increase in its production target for August, keeping its commitment unchanged despite increasing evidence that spare capacity within the oil group has thinned to its lowest level in years.

US Supreme Court Limits Federal Emission-Setting Powers. In a blow to US President Biden, the US Supreme Court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency does not have authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing coal- and gas-fired power plants. "

Edited by Ecocharger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

45 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

If that is so then how is it possible that today's court overruled their previous decisions, several of them? That would mean that the Supreme Court was ether unconstitutional in the past or it is today. 

You do not understand how the Supreme Court works. They change their views over time on such issues as slavery, abortion, regulatory powers of the federal branch. 

Welcome to reality.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

58 minutes ago, Ecocharger said:

You do not understand how the Supreme Court works. They change their views over time on such issues as slavery, abortion, regulatory powers of the federal branch. 

Welcome to reality.

Which negates EWO's proposition. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

Peak oil is a long way off, with Biden & Co. losing a court ruling on regulatory powers.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Supply-Disruptions-Drive-Bullish-Sentiment-In-Oil-Markets.html

"As uncertainty builds around the supply capacity of OPEC+ and oil demand rages on despite expectations of demand destruction, bullish sentiment is building in oil markets. Now, to add to that bullish sentiment, another form of supply disruption is springing up around the world: strikes. Operations at France’s Fos Refinery were halted by strikes and Norway’s offshore production was heavily impacted by them as well. It seems the oil market is under siege from all sides, from fundamental tightness to underinvestment, disruptions related to the war in Ukraine, and now strikes. 

OPEC+ Summit Fails to Impress. OPEC+ agreed to maintain a 648,000 b/d increase in its production target for August, keeping its commitment unchanged despite increasing evidence that spare capacity within the oil group has thinned to its lowest level in years.

US Supreme Court Limits Federal Emission-Setting Powers. In a blow to US President Biden, the US Supreme Court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency does not have authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing coal- and gas-fired power plants. "

Everything in your post points to peak oil having occurred.

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Ecocharger said:

Peak oil is a long way off, with Biden & Co. losing a court ruling on regulatory powers.

https://oilprice.com/Energy/Energy-General/Supply-Disruptions-Drive-Bullish-Sentiment-In-Oil-Markets.html

"As uncertainty builds around the supply capacity of OPEC+ and oil demand rages on despite expectations of demand destruction, bullish sentiment is building in oil markets. Now, to add to that bullish sentiment, another form of supply disruption is springing up around the world: strikes. Operations at France’s Fos Refinery were halted by strikes and Norway’s offshore production was heavily impacted by them as well. It seems the oil market is under siege from all sides, from fundamental tightness to underinvestment, disruptions related to the war in Ukraine, and now strikes. 

OPEC+ Summit Fails to Impress. OPEC+ agreed to maintain a 648,000 b/d increase in its production target for August, keeping its commitment unchanged despite increasing evidence that spare capacity within the oil group has thinned to its lowest level in years.

US Supreme Court Limits Federal Emission-Setting Powers. In a blow to US President Biden, the US Supreme Court ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency does not have authority to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from existing coal- and gas-fired power plants. "

more BS babble from the guy who loves his ICE clunkers and $5 GAS.......

oil demand rages on???? in the face of the US dropping Gas demand in the past 6 months by close to a million barrels a day and you can bet the rest of the world is on the same track.........

Peak oil happened and it was brought to you by your master, Putin and his pal MBS in Saudi Arabia

 

Permanent demand destruction is happening now....ICE vehicles are being replaced with EV's

Enjoy your $5 gas

 

  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

Peak Oil has happened. $5 gas is driving the EV market

 

INSIDER

Opportunists are flipping Teslas for profits of up to $7,000 as EV production struggles to meet demand, report says

Abby Wallace 10 hours agoTeslas charging at a station in Burbank, CA.
A Tesla supercharger station in Burbank, California. Kent Nishimura /Getty Images
  • Tesla owners are buying and selling their cars for profit, The Los Angeles Times reported.
  • Some owners claimed they made profits of up to $7,000, according to the newspaper.
  • Manufacturers are struggling to meet surging demand for EVs, leading buyers to look elsewhere./public/assets/shared/the-refresh-logo.png
 

People are buying and reselling their electric cars for profits worth thousands of dollars as demand for EVs surges amid ongoing production problems. 

Tesla owners are "flipping" their cars for thousands more than they paid to buyers who would otherwise have to wait months to get a new vehicle from the manufacturer, The Los Angeles Times reported.

One Tesla flipper claimed he made profits of $4,000 and $7,000 on two separate sales, the newspaper reported.

Dennis Wang told The LA Times that he plans to sell his Tesla Model S in the next three months and has already ordered two more cars.

 

Another Tesla owner claimed a profit of $5,000 after selling a car just nine months after taking delivery, per the report.

Insider could not independently verify the sellers' profit claims.

Interest in electric vehicles has surged amid soaring gas prices, leaving many manufacturers struggling to keep up with demand and forcing customers on to long waiting lists. 

The industry has also been struggling to obtain enough computer chips due to supply chain issues, pushing up the cost of all cars.

EV manufacturers including Tesla have increased prices, but flippers are still making profits. "In terms of Teslas, the price of new vehicles increased so much last year, and waiting periods are so long for new vehicles, that the value of used cars skyrocketed," Recurrent, a company tracking EV sales, told The LA Times.

Insider found a number of Tesla Model Ys listed for almost $80,000 on Edmunds.com. The car starts at just $57,440 on the Tesla website. 

A 2022 Tesla Model X was also listed on Facebook marketplace for $149,000, with the seller quipping: "Why wait 6 months when you can get this one now."

Meanwhile, the UK's biggest car maker, Jaguar Land Rover, is trying to stop dealers sending cars to China and other markets where they can fetch significantly higher prices than in Britain, The Telegraph newspaper reported.

A Land Rover Evoque starts at £32,620 ($39,367) in the UK but costs at least £47,463 ($57,273) in China and £55,065 ($66,449) in South Africa, according to company prices cited in the report.

 
 

 

Edited by notsonice

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

6 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

If that is so then how is it possible that today's court overruled their previous decisions, several of them? That would mean that the Supreme Court was ether unconstitutional in the past or it is today. 

You do mean its previous position, "their" is no longer. To the point however the court now represents the constitution as it was written, and not a policy one or two individuals wish to see made constitutional without involving the legislative body....Making new law is messy..so many opinions that often lack substance..a adversarial process...the court does not engage in such matters they do however decide if the final law followed the constitution. It is my opinion only liberal judges take the law into their own hands...the self sense of worth or sense of purpose...Imagine that one single person deciding the track of US law...

Edited by Eyes Wide Open

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.