Jay McKinsey

Tesla is the Most American Made Car!

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All you real American Patriots be on notice, Tesla is the most American made car:

 Cars.com’s American-Made Index ranks all qualifying vehicles built and bought in the U.S., the 2021 study ranks 90 vehicles through the same five major criteria: assembly location, parts content, engine origins, transmission origins and U.S. manufacturing workforce.

The Top 20

Model: Assembly location for cars sold in the U.S. (rank in the 2020 American-Made Index)

1. Tesla Model 3: Fremont, Calif. (4) | Research | Shop
2. Ford Mustang: Flat Rock, Mich. (34) | Research | Shop
3. Tesla Model Y: Fremont, Calif. (unranked) | Research | Shop
4. Jeep Cherokee: Belvidere, Ill. (2) | Research | Shop
5. Chevrolet Corvette: Bowling Green, Ky. (8) | Research | Shop
6. Honda Ridgeline: Lincoln, Ala. (6) | Research | Shop
7. Honda Odyssey: Lincoln, Ala. (5) | Research | Shop
8. Honda Pilot: Lincoln, Ala. (13) | Research | Shop
9. Honda Passport: Lincoln, Ala. (7) | Research | Shop
10. Toyota Tundra: San Antonio (16) | Research | Shop
11. Ford Expedition, Expedition Max: Louisville, Ky. (20) | Research | Shop
12. Acura RDX: East Liberty, Ohio (14) | Research | Shop
13. Acura TLX: Marysville, Ohio (25) | Research | Shop
14. Chevrolet Colorado: Wentzville, Mo. (10) | Research | Shop
15. GMC Canyon: Wentzville, Mo. (11) | Research | Shop
16. Jeep Grand Cherokee: Detroit (26) | Research | Shop
17. Honda Accord: Marysville, Ohio (15) | Research | Shop
18. Toyota Avalon: Georgetown, Ky. (29) | Research | Shop
19. Lexus ES: Georgetown, Ky.* (28) | Research | Shop
20. Lincoln Navigator, Navigator L: Louisville, Ky. (54) | Research | Shop

Time to stop buying foreign made cars like the F150 and Silverado. :)

https://www.cars.com/articles/2021-cars-com-american-made-index-which-cars-are-the-most-american-437020/

 

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Tesla-vehicle-sales-quarterly-deliveries-Q2-2021-logo-watermark.png

Tesla sets another quarterly record for deliveries.

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(edited)

The Tesla Model 3 was the UK’s overall best selling vehicle (of any powertrain) in the month, with 5,468 units sold. 

June-2021-UK-Passenger-Auto-Registrations-SQ.png

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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Yep, That BRAND NEW PLAID caught fire and driver bales as car is moving! Took Fire Department 4 Hour’s of continuous water to cool the battery pack…..

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(edited)

2 hours ago, RichieRich216 said:

Yep, That BRAND NEW PLAID caught fire and driver bales as car is moving! Took Fire Department 4 Hour’s of continuous water to cool the battery pack…..

Owner is a TSLAQ and crypto investor at a hedge fund. This story is far from finished.

It wasn't 4 hours:

“Engine 24 with a crew of 7 arrived on scene simultaneously with Engine 25. Due to prior training classes on Tesla Vehicle Fire emergencies, Engine 24 laid a 5 inch supply line into the scene so that we could keep a continual water stream on the fire to extinguish the fire and cool the batteries down to ensure complete extinguishment. Engine 24 and Engine 25 both deployed hand lines to extinguish the fire, each maintained a dedicated water source and continued to cool the vehicle down for almost 90 minutes. Firefighters were on scene for just over 3 hours dealing with this emergency. Nobody was hurt in the incident, and both crews worked hard in the high heat/humidity to mitigate the incident,” the Gladwyne Volunteer Fire Company wrote

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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On 7/3/2021 at 7:31 AM, Jay McKinsey said:

Tesla sets another quarterly record for deliveries.

Jay - in passing you do realise that 200,000 deliveries in a quarter is precisely nothing.. that's less than 7 per cent of the Australian new car sales market. Would the stats guys even bother to note the market share in the US? Anyway. I shook myself out of usual lethargy regarding Tesla to look at the March quarter accounts (download from here).. does anyone know why Tesla has  $US17.14 billion in cash and cash equivalents (at call deposits and so on) hanging around? This seems like a colossal amount of money to keep in petty cash.. Admittedly current liabilities (debt at call) is $14.8, including more than $6 billion owed to suppliers, but still all that should be handled as part of normal operations. Is it usual for US corporations to keep so much cash on hand?     

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4 hours ago, markslawson said:

Jay - in passing you do realise that 200,000 deliveries in a quarter is precisely nothing.. that's less than 7 per cent of the Australian new car sales market. Would the stats guys even bother to note the market share in the US? Anyway. I shook myself out of usual lethargy regarding Tesla to look at the March quarter accounts (download from here).. does anyone know why Tesla has  $US17.14 billion in cash and cash equivalents (at call deposits and so on) hanging around? This seems like a colossal amount of money to keep in petty cash.. Admittedly current liabilities (debt at call) is $14.8, including more than $6 billion owed to suppliers, but still all that should be handled as part of normal operations. Is it usual for US corporations to keep so much cash on hand?     

One must never go beyond fundamentals, Tesla is a US car company,paid for by the US tax citizen's. What corporation in the world could afford such luxurys aside from the US government or better said tolerant that.

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(edited)

1 hour ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

One must never go beyond fundamentals, Tesla is a US car company,paid for by the US tax citizen's. What corporation in the world could afford such luxurys aside from the US government or better said tolerant that.

Actually they sell even more credits in Europe than the US and they are beginning to sell credits in China. Once again I must point out that the taxes in the US are on the sale of ICE in only the 12 ZEV states. Tesla gets nothing from the federal government.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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1 hour ago, Eyes Wide Open said:

One must never go beyond fundamentals, Tesla is a US car company,paid for by the US tax citizen's. What corporation in the world could afford such luxurys aside from the US government or better said tolerant that.

 

8 minutes ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Actually they sell even more credits in Europe than the US and they are beginning to sell credits in China. Once again I must point out that the taxes in the US are on the sale of ICE in only the 12 ZEV states. Tesla gets nothing from the federal government.

Apologies on earlier post - I misplaced the decimal point.. in fact Tesla's sales would be equivalent to about 80 per cent of the Australian total market.. still wouldn't amount to much world-wide but I made an error.

Musk is a past master of wringing tax concessions and benefits out of state and local governments, but to work it all out would require a real forensic deep dive into the accounts and who has time for that?  

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4 minutes ago, markslawson said:

 

Apologies on earlier post - I misplaced the decimal point.. in fact Tesla's sales would be equivalent to about 80 per cent of the Australian total market.. still wouldn't amount to much world-wide but I made an error.

Musk is a past master of wringing tax concessions and benefits out of state and local governments, but to work it all out would require a real forensic deep dive into the accounts and who has time for that?  

Tesla only has two factories and is about a third of BMW or Daimler production. How long have they been building cars? Tesla didn't even have a production car 10 years ago. It's about the growth curve, you won't be able to easily dismiss them in a few years.

Are you getting ready for the Chinese EV onslaught in Australia? BYD is coming in a big way starting in 6 months.

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16 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Owner is a TSLAQ and crypto investor at a hedge fund. This story is far from finished.

It wasn't 4 hours:

“Engine 24 with a crew of 7 arrived on scene simultaneously with Engine 25. Due to prior training classes on Tesla Vehicle Fire emergencies, Engine 24 laid a 5 inch supply line into the scene so that we could keep a continual water stream on the fire to extinguish the fire and cool the batteries down to ensure complete extinguishment. Engine 24 and Engine 25 both deployed hand lines to extinguish the fire, each maintained a dedicated water source and continued to cool the vehicle down for almost 90 minutes. Firefighters were on scene for just over 3 hours dealing with this emergency. Nobody was hurt in the incident, and both crews worked hard in the high heat/humidity to mitigate the incident,” the Gladwyne Volunteer Fire Company wrote

Ok 3 Hours, And the next big shortage coming worldwide is water, Any idea how much a 5 inch line @ 3 hours pumps? A shit load of drinking water! This is going to be the new normal with EV’s, Go Green and have not contemplated all that toxic releases when they burn to the ground!

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(edited)

18 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Owner is a TSLAQ and crypto investor at a hedge fund. This story is far from finished.

It wasn't 4 hours:

“Engine 24 with a crew of 7 arrived on scene simultaneously with Engine 25. Due to prior training classes on Tesla Vehicle Fire emergencies, Engine 24 laid a 5 inch supply line into the scene so that we could keep a continual water stream on the fire to extinguish the fire and cool the batteries down to ensure complete extinguishment. Engine 24 and Engine 25 both deployed hand lines to extinguish the fire, each maintained a dedicated water source and continued to cool the vehicle down for almost 90 minutes. Firefighters were on scene for just over 3 hours dealing with this emergency. Nobody was hurt in the incident, and both crews worked hard in the high heat/humidity to mitigate the incident,” the Gladwyne Volunteer Fire Company wrote

I am surprised the battery industry including Tesla and government has not announced a serious push to handle battery fires. This seems like commonsense. How do you handle fires and cleanup along with regulations requiring the proper equipment within x miles. Or x equipment required by population of batteries in areas. Battery storage facilities probably need and entirely different set of regulations. That may be as bad as a refinery explosion for example. 
Think floods, tornadoes lighting and terrorism.

Edited by Boat

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2 minutes ago, Boat said:

I am surprised the battery industry including Tesla and government has not announced a serious push to handle battery fires. This seems like commons. How do you handle fires and cleanup along with regulations requiring the proper equipment within x miles. Or x equipment required by population of batteries in areas. Battery storage facilities probably need and entirely different set of regulations. That may be as bad as a refinery explosion for example. 

What from that report makes you think that isn't happening? It clearly states that the firefighters had training and it just required spraying water on it for 90 minutes.

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1 hour ago, Jay McKinsey said:

What from that report makes you think that isn't happening? It clearly states that the firefighters had training and it just required spraying water on it for 90 minutes.

That's for a medium-sized car, which is what the typical fire department must handle, and as more FDs get more training, they won't need to roll a second engine. Home battery fires will be uglier: as bad as home fires that involve heating oil tanks. A fire in a home with solar panels is also a bit of a mess because a fireman on the roof (or hosing a roof) needs to worry about high DC voltages. Not as bad as an NG explosion or a high-voltage AC wire shorted to the house input feed, but still something new to worry about. Videos of all these events are quite spectacular.

The big utility-scale battery fields are a whole 'nother story. If one of those Megapacks goes into thermal runaway, I doubt you can do much except watch it burn and try to keep its neighbors cool. There's a reason that the spaces between the Megapacks are wider than the width of a Megapack.

I truly hope that the fire crews know what to do if a standalone Megapack (e.g., at a Supercharger site) goes up.

Fire crews have been dealing with new and exciting types of fire all along, especially new types of chemical fires. A battery going into thermal runaway is just another new type.

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15 minutes ago, Dan Clemmensen said:

That's for a medium-sized car, which is what the typical fire department must handle, and as more FDs get more training, they won't need to roll a second engine. Home battery fires will be uglier: as bad as home fires that involve heating oil tanks. A fire in a home with solar panels is also a bit of a mess because a fireman on the roof (or hosing a roof) needs to worry about high DC voltages. Not as bad as an NG explosion or a high-voltage AC wire shorted to the house input feed, but still something new to worry about. Videos of all these events are quite spectacular.

The big utility-scale battery fields are a whole 'nother story. If one of those Megapacks goes into thermal runaway, I doubt you can do much except watch it burn and try to keep its neighbors cool. There's a reason that the spaces between the Megapacks are wider than the width of a Megapack.

I truly hope that the fire crews know what to do if a standalone Megapack (e.g., at a Supercharger site) goes up.

Fire crews have been dealing with new and exciting types of fire all along, especially new types of chemical fires. A battery going into thermal runaway is just another new type.

With Megapack now using LFP it seems that threat is nearly eliminated.

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On 7/2/2021 at 2:31 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

 

Tesla-vehicle-sales-quarterly-deliveries-Q2-2021-logo-watermark.png

Tesla sets another quarterly record for deliveries.

The annual global production of vehicles is about 94 million, or about 23.5 million/qtr.   Therefore, Tesla's .2 million/qtr is less than 1% of all vehicles. That's does not sound like a lot, but that's not the real story. The real story is Tesla's demonstrated ability to grow their production. They are approximately doubling every two years, and this was mostly at the Fremont plant, a converted legacy auto plant on a fairly constrained land parcel. The new plants started out huge, on big parcels of land with room for growth, and specifically designed to produce Teslas, so doubling every two years from now to 2030 is likely to be achievable. Ten years, five doublings is a factor of 32.

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1 minute ago, Jay McKinsey said:

With Megapack now using LFP it seems that threat is nearly eliminated.

The specific threat of a thermal runaway is limited, but any time you store energy, that energy can find a way to escape, whether it's a ship full of ammonium nitrate or dust in a grain elevator.  the fire crew will need to be able to handle it.

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5 minutes ago, Dan Clemmensen said:

The annual global production of vehicles is about 94 million, or about 23.5 million/qtr.   Therefore, Tesla's .2 million/qtr is less than 1% of all vehicles. That's does not sound like a lot, but that's not the real story. The real story is Tesla's demonstrated ability to grow their production. They are approximately doubling every two years, and this was mostly at the Fremont plant, a converted legacy auto plant on a fairly constrained land parcel. The new plants started out huge, on big parcels of land with room for growth, and specifically designed to produce Teslas, so doubling every two years from now to 2030 is likely to be achievable. Ten years, five doublings is a factor of 32.

A penny becomes $10.24 in ten doublings. Not likely for Teslas! China will outrun them IMHO. Labor costs are a huge factor. EVs need a lot more time to grow popularity unless prices come way down. 

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1 minute ago, ronwagn said:

A penny becomes $10.24 in ten doublings. Not likely for Teslas! China will outrun them IMHO. Labor costs are a huge factor. EVs need a lot more time to grow popularity unless prices come way down. 

Tesla is the number one EV manufacturer in China. Their primary competion for that title is the $5,000 Mini EV. Costs come down as production grows and sales go up as costs go down. It is a virtuous cycle.

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(edited)

I would consider an EV when the price benefit ratio makes sense to me. That would mean quick charging, a ponderous charging network, home charging, a vastly improved national grid etc. There are a lot of hard core ICE people though, I imagine. I will be in the market for a new minivan in a few years, I still doubt it will be a minivan.

What do you say to those who claim that small EV batteries in small cars lead to short battery lives? They could be built on "sledlike" designs with various overstructures and larger batteries. 

Edited by ronwagn
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2 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

I would consider an EV when the price benefit ratio makes sense to me. That would mean quick charging, a ponderous charging network, home charging, a vastly improved national grid etc. There are a lot of hard core ICE people though, I imagine. I will be in the market for a new minivan in a few years, I still doubt it will be a minivan.

What do you say to those who claim that small EV batteries in small cars lead to short batter lives? They could be built on "sledlike" designs with various overstructures and larger batteries. 

I say they don't know what they are talking about. The small batteries will all be LFP which don't suffer from the same degradation issues as NMC/NMA used in the large batteries.

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2 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

I would consider an EV when the price benefit ratio makes sense to me. That would mean quick charging, a ponderous charging network, home charging, a vastly improved national grid etc. There are a lot of hard core ICE people though, I imagine. I will be on the market for a new minivan in a few years, I still doubt it will be a minivan.

What do you say to those who claim that small EV batteries in small cars lead to short batter lives? They could be built on "sledlike" designs with various overstructures and larger batteries. 

My daughter drives a Pacifica PHEV minivan. It works out nicely, as PHEV fits the minivan lifestyle (lots of short kid-hauling trips around town, occasional longer trips to the mountains or beach), so it saves a whole lot on gas. You are still a slave to the dealership and still have oil changes and other maintanence, though.

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(edited)

I know of one other person who that works out well for. She had a short commute and is now retired and is not a traveler. For me it would not work out for our long distance trips. We have been to all fifty states plus Canada and Mexico. No we didn't drive to Alaska or Hawaii. My wife wants to drive to Alaska though. I tell her that British Columbia is just as good and has better weather and roads. We regularly drive in loops from rural Illinois to California and back. 

Edited by ronwagn

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4 hours ago, RichieRich216 said:

Ok 3 Hours, And the next big shortage coming worldwide is water, Any idea how much a 5 inch line @ 3 hours pumps? A shit load of drinking water! This is going to be the new normal with EV’s, Go Green and have not contemplated all that toxic releases when they burn to the ground!

Imagine how much water an 18 wheeler EV fire would require. Plus possible crater in the freeway. 

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(edited)

2 hours ago, Dan Clemmensen said:

The annual global production of vehicles is about 94 million, or about 23.5 million/qtr.   Therefore, Tesla's .2 million/qtr is less than 1% of all vehicles. That's does not sound like a lot, but that's not the real story. The real story is Tesla's demonstrated ability to grow their production. They are approximately doubling every two years, and this was mostly at the Fremont plant, a converted legacy auto plant on a fairly constrained land parcel. The new plants started out huge, on big parcels of land with room for growth, and specifically designed to produce Teslas, so doubling every two years from now to 2030 is likely to be achievable. Ten years, five doublings is a factor of 32.

Tesla should pass BMW and Mercedes in 3 to 4 years. Volkswagen and Toyota in 10 years.

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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