Germany Orders Daimler to Recall 774,000 Diesel Cars in Europe

The German government ordered Daimler AG to recall 774,000 diesel cars in Europe equipped with software that turns off emissions controls under certain conditions.  The affected vehicles include the Mercedes-Benz Vito delivery van and the Mercedes GLC 220d and C220d.

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So many German auto manufacturers have been accused and found guilty of emissions cheating software on their range of Diesel vehicles, of which the most famous case is Volkswagen. If I'm correct, many of them use Bosch Montronic ECU updated version. 

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Volkswagen is the best known case of cheating but not only German manufacturers are cheating. Many other European carmakers are doing the same and they all have to compete with Germany  on European market which is the most fuel consumption focused market. 

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The consequences of the Volkswagen scandal are still present. Audi AG Chief Executive Stadler is under the investigation by German prosecutors on suspicion of fraud in Volkswagen  emissions-cheating scandal. 

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gee if you cant trust the germans, who can you trust?

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On 6/11/2018 at 6:37 PM, LAOIL said:

Volkswagen is the best known case of cheating but not only German manufacturers are cheating. Many other European carmakers are doing the same and they all have to compete with Germany  on European market which is the most fuel consumption focused market. 

No one else has been charged or prosecuted though. 

I saw one comment on a forum from a claimed insider that said that while all manufacturers tweak their engine performance to get the best from official tests it was only VW (and possibly Daimler & BMW) who had actually been utilising cheat technology. 

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The "diesel cheating" was a logical and natural response to unreasonable diesel-emissions standards being crafted by some rather stentorian bureaucrats.  They were not achievable, unless vehicle performance were to be written off during certain driving conditions such as acceleration. I consider the response of the mid-level engineers and managers entirely predictable. It cannot be done, so they figure out some way around the regulation. 

Now, what are the longer-term implications of all the heavy swatting and huge fines being heaped on Volkswagen, and the jailing of the CEO of Audi  (he just got imprisoned in a form of detention to keep him from fleeing, although where he would go is not clear.  Africa, perhaps?). This abusive response of the government bureaucrats will impel the manufacturers to totally abandon the diesel, which, whatever you might say negatively about it, remains a cheapo engine to build and run.  Instead, much more complex machines will be built, such as that Volvo flywheel-hybrid transmission designed to boost acceleration with minimal fuel use and small engines.But who is going to buy those things?  Not Mr. and Mrs. Poor Boy.  Those machines will be expensive, not quite Tesla level, but pricey enough. Eventually, over a long haul, you will see those machines filter down into the used-car markets (and hopefully not be too expensive to repair), and you will see reduced fuel burning.  But if your real intent is to reduce fuel consumption, then you would be better off to ease up on the diesel Rules, let those cheap machines get sold, and figure out a way to install reliable and cheap after-treatment systems. 

But bureaucrats do not think that way.  Too simple.

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