Ron Wagner

How Far Have We Really Gotten With Alternative Energy

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"Once the pre-approved projects are built, Carbon Brief estimates they will generate 42 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity per year, enough to meet around 13% of current UK demand."

That is at full capacity. Texas windmills are currently generating 8% of their full capacity during the heat wave. You cannot guarantee the wind will blow at 100% every day.

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Family needed to replace 2014 Ford focus battery. Cost is $14,000. But, even at that price you cannot buy one as they no longer make them.

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10 hours ago, Michael Sanches said:

"Once the pre-approved projects are built, Carbon Brief estimates they will generate 42 terawatt hours (TWh) of electricity per year, enough to meet around 13% of current UK demand."

That is at full capacity. Texas windmills are currently generating 8% of their full capacity during the heat wave. You cannot guarantee the wind will blow at 100% every day.

No, that annual output number is based on using the capacity factor. As to variability, that is what batteries and green hydrogen are for.

Utility-scale energy storage activity in the UK saw strong growth during 2021 with annual deployment growing 70% compared to 2020. Additionally, the pipeline of future projects increased by 11 GW to over 27 GW by the end of 2021.

Texas won't have a problem once they get all the solar+storage built out that is in the pipeline.

Edited by Jay McKinsey
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7 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

Texas won't have a problem once they get all the solar+storage built out that is in the pipeline.

As of Oct. 2021, ERCOT had about 1100 MW of grid-connected battery storage in service with a pipeline of 4,000 MW by March 2023.

In 2019, ERCOT generated 220,614 MW of electricity.per day by wind and solar. So, by March 2023, battery storage  in Texas will = 153 replacement minutes of wind and solar power.

 

 

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17 hours ago, Michael Sanches said:

 

That is at full capacity. Texas windmills are currently generating 8% of their full capacity during the heat wave. You cannot guarantee the wind will blow at 100% every day.

True. You can, however predict quite well what to expect the next day or two, and MANAGE it.  For many days, ERCOT's wind and solar has outperformed expectations.  For instance, ERCOT today...

 

 

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Edited by turbguy

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5 hours ago, Michael Sanches said:

As of Oct. 2021, ERCOT had about 1100 MW of grid-connected battery storage in service with a pipeline of 4,000 MW by March 2023.

In 2019, ERCOT generated 220,614 MW of electricity.per day by wind and solar. So, by March 2023, battery storage  in Texas will = 153 replacement minutes of wind and solar power.

 

 

The pipeline has grown a little since then:

Texas Commissioners Considering New Distribution Interconnection Standards for Battery Storage

April 4, 2022
With some 65 GW of solar and storage already in the interconnection queue, the TPUC is concerned about an unknown amount of BESS eventually linking into the distribution system.

The Electric Reliability Council of Texas, which manages that state’s electric grid, has an incoming power distribution problem bigger than you can hang a hat on.

Recent discussions within the Texas Public Utility Commission concerns challenges over vast amounts of utility-scale solar and energy storage capacity joining into the already massive and diverse ERCOT system. The TPUC also wants to figure out cohesive policy on handling that influx of solar and storage as it enters the distribution grid.

“There are 36,000 MWs of utility-scale solar plus energy storage systems, and over 31,000 MW of stand-alone storage in the ERCOT Interconnection queue,” TPUC Commissioner Jimmy Glotfelty wrote in an open memo to Chairman Peter Lake and fellow commissioners Lori Cobos and Will McAdams.

Beyond that may be a potential torrent of battery energy storage systems either within utility-scale or perhaps microgrid projects on a more customer-facing level.

“Unfortunately it is unknown how many megawatts of battery storage are seeking to interconnect to the distribution systems across ERCOT’s utilities, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives,” Glotfelty added. “The lack of visility into these distribution assets is an oversight.”

 https://www.tdworld.com/distributed-energy-resources/energy-storage/article/21238009/energytech-texas-commissioners-considering-new-distribution-interconnection-standards-for-battery-storage
Edited by Jay McKinsey

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On 7/18/2022 at 1:08 AM, Michael Sanches said:

Family needed to replace 2014 Ford focus battery. Cost is $14,000. But, even at that price you cannot buy one as they no longer make them.

I would think that someone should be manufacturing custom lithium batteries. They are made of small batteries in different shapes and sizes. I am sure there are a lot of complications with wiring, controllers etc. but that should be known technology. For that price you could almost buy a Mitsubishi Mirage and get up to 40 mpg. 

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On 7/20/2022 at 3:15 AM, Ron Wagner said:

I would think that someone should be manufacturing custom lithium batteries. They are made of small batteries in different shapes and sizes. I am sure there are a lot of complications with wiring, controllers etc. but that should be known technology. For that price you could almost buy a Mitsubishi Mirage and get up to 40 mpg. 

"Complications with controllers" is quite an understatement, Ron. It is best NOT to make automotive batteries out of laptop-sized parts, Tesla-style.

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the death of coal around the world
 
 
on track to install something like 250 gigawatts of solar capacity this year........
 
Yahoo Finance

Global solar demand ‘staggering,' on track to grow 30%: analyst

Grace O'Donnell
·Assistant Editor
Sat, July 30, 2022 at 6:42 AM·4 min read

The energy transition is well underway as solar demand blazes higher.

Rob Barnett, a senior clean energy analyst at Bloomberg, forecasted that solar capacity installations are on track to grow by 30% globally this year and see sustained double-digit growth in 2023 through 2025.

“At the end of the day, the global solar picture is just staggering at this point," Barnett told Yahoo Finance Live (video above). "We are on track to install something like 250 gigawatts of solar capacity this year. I know most folks don't think in gigawatts, but that is a very large amount. It's more than the installed capacity of a number of European countries.”

China leads the world in solar capacity and plans to double the amount of solar panels deployed this year.

Renewable energy is reaching record highs in other countries as well. Germany broke its record for solar generation on July 17, Bloomberg reported, as a searing heat wave swept Europe. And thanks to solar and wind installations, U.S. renewable energy generation hit an all-time high of 28% in April.

The boom in solar is just beginning, Barnett said, “and so there really is this big, top-line growth scenario that we see unfolding for all of the companies that are participating in the solar supply chain."

Investors can play to this theme in a number of ways, Barnett explained. "You've got First Solar, Canadian Solar — these companies that make the modules that you see out on, perhaps, roofs or out in a field somewhere," he said. "And then you've got other supporting companies like SolarEdge or Enphase, which make the inverters that convert the DC electricity from solar into AC for the grid."

Electricians with IBEW Local 3 install solar panels on top of the Terminal B garage at LaGuardia Airport, Nov. 9, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)
 
Electricians with IBEW Local 3 install solar panels on top of the Terminal B garage at LaGuardia Airport, Nov. 9, 2021, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Energy costs driving clean power

As extreme weather events around the globe demonstrate the climate crisis happening in real time, many countries have held fast to their climate targets, at least on paper.

However, soaring oil and gas prices, particularly in Europe, have complicated the picture in recent months.

In early July, the European Union voted to label natural gas as a green energy source in some instances, which threatened to derail its climate ambitions. But at the same time, higher natural gas and oil prices have made renewables seem cheap by comparison.

“I do think that there is increasing focus on all sorts of solutions to try to help manage emissions and tackle the concerns of climate change,” Barnett said. “But I would actually argue that the bigger driver for clean energy demand, particularly here in Europe, is elevated energy costs.”

And while higher oil prices sparked by Russia's invasion of Ukraine have made solar a more cost-competitive option, it helps that the price of solar had already fallen precipitously in recent years.

Experts who predicted an incremental drop in solar prices have marveled at just how quickly they've plummeted due to improved efficiency and lower module prices. In 2000, the cost of solar modules hovered around $4.88 per watt. By 2019, that cost fell to $0.38 per watt.

In 2021, the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) reported that renewable energy was the cheapest source of power. IRENA also found that around two-thirds of renewable energy projects were cheaper than bringing new coal plants online, something unthinkable just decades ago.

As a result, solar demand is likely to sustain its momentum — even if oil and natural gas prices subside.

"It's certainly possible that if you had some easing in the traditional fuel markets, that it might take the accelerator off," Barnett said. "But I don't really see that as being a material risk on the demand side of the equation for clean energy."

Barnett added that while renewables like solar aren't always a “turnkey solution” due to intermittencies, “I do think that the economics are already quite good. And so you'd have to see such a sea change in terms of gas prices or coal prices, if you're thinking about the power grid, to really reverse some of the trends. And I just don't think there's any appetite for it either.”

Grace is an assistant editor for Yahoo Finance.

Edited by notsonice
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the death of coal one solar panel and one wind turbine at a time...and following the the footsteps Oil...

 

please note

China’s large-scale solar investments totalled $41bn in 1H 2022, up 173% from the year before and it also invested $58bn in new wind projects, up 107% year-on-year.

“The investment growth trend follows China’s strategy to build new renewable generation capacity so that it can replace its existing coal fleet.

reNEWS

Solar, wind investment in H1 hits $226bn

'Record-breaking' figure shows acceleration in demand for clean energy despite rising input costs, says BNEF

2 August 2022 12:13 Other News [Image: Unsplash/Andres Simon
 

Global investment in renewables totalled $226bn in the first half of 2022, setting a new record for the first six months of a year, according to BloombergNEF (BNEF).

 

The uptick in investment reflects an acceleration in demand for clean energy supplies to tackle the ongoing global energy and climate crises, the analyst stated.

 

BNEF’s latest report, the Renewable Energy Investment Tracker 2H 2022, found that Investment in new large- and small-scale solar projects rose to a record-breaking $120bn, up 33% from the first half of 2021.

Wind project financing was up 16% from 1H 2021, at $84bn.

 

Both sectors have been challenged recently by rising input costs for key materials such as steel and polysilicon, as well as supply chain disruptions and rising financing costs.

 

The figures indicate that investor appetite is stronger than ever, in part due to the very high energy prices currently being seen in many markets around the world, BNEF stated.

 

As well as seeing booming project investments, the first half also saw an all-time record for venture capital and private equity investments into renewables and energy storage, with $9.6bn raised - up 63% on the previous year.

 

One category that saw falling investment was public equity issuances.

 

After a very strong first half in 2021, public market issuances for renewable energy companies dropped 65% in 1H 2022, totalling $10.5bn. The 2Q figure, at $3.9bn raised, is the lowest quarterly total since 2Q 2020. 

 

Albert Cheung, head of analysis at BloombergNEF, said: “Despite the headwinds presented by ongoing cost inflation and supply chain challenges, demand for clean energy sources has never been higher, and we expect that the global energy crisis will continue to act as an accelerant for the clean energy transition.”

 

China’s large-scale solar investments totalled $41bn in 1H 2022, up 173% from the year before and it also invested $58bn in new wind projects, up 107% year-on-year.

 

Nannan Kou, BNEF’s head of China analysis, said: “Green infrastructure is the most important investment area that China is relying on to boost its weak economy in the second half of 2022.

 

“The investment growth trend follows China’s strategy to build new renewable generation capacity so that it can replace its existing coal fleet.

 

China is well on track to hit its 1200GW wind and solar capacity target by 2030.”

 

Offshore wind saw investment rise 52% from the previous year, to $32bn.

 

Chelsea Jean-Michel, offshore wind analyst at BNEF said: “Investments in 2022 will flow into projects coming online in the next few years as the offshore wind installed base is set to grow tenfold from 53GW in 2021 to 504GW in 2035.”

Edited by notsonice
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First Solar to invest $1bn to ramp US PV production

Investment will expand the company’s ability to domestically produce solar modules to over 10GW

 30 August 2022 11:06

 

 

First Solar plans to invest over $1bn in scaling production of US-made thin film solar modules, supporting the country’s energy decarbonisation efforts.

 

The investment is forecast to expand the company’s ability to produce American-made solar modules for the US solar market to over 10GW (dc) by 2025.

 

As part of its push to scale US production of solar modules, First Solar intends to build its fourth, fully vertically integrated domestic factory, with an annual capacity of 3.5GW (dc), in the US south-east.

First Solar, the only US-headquartered company among the world’s 10 largest PV manufacturers, expects to invest up to $1bn in the new factory, which, contingent upon permitting and pending approval of various federal, state, regional, and local incentives, is expected to commence operations in 2025.

 

Additionally, the company will invest $185m in upgrading and expanding its north-west Ohio manufacturing footprint, which is the largest vertically-integrated complex of its kind in the Western Hemisphere, by 900MW (dc).

 

As part of its plans, First Solar will invest in expanding the capacity of its two operating facilities in Perrysburg and Lake Township, Ohio, by 600MW (dc) to 3.6GW (dc) of annual Series 6 module capacity.

 

The company will also expand its third Ohio factory, expected to be commissioned in the first half of 2023, to 3.5GW (dc) of annual Series 7 module capacity.

 

The expansion will increase First Solar’s total investment in its Ohio manufacturing facilities to over $3bn, with a cumulative annual production capacity of over 7GW (dc) by 2025.

 

First Solar estimates that the new investment will add at least 850 new manufacturing jobs, taking its total number of direct jobs in the US to over 3000 people in four states by 2025, which is believed to make it the largest employer in the American solar manufacturing sector.

 

By 2025, First Solar is also expected to support an estimated 15,000 indirect and induced jobs as a result of its ongoing and future manufacturing operations.

 

“In passing the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, Congress and the Biden-Harris Administration has entrusted our industry with the responsibility of enabling America’s clean energy future and we must meet the moment in a manner that is both timely and sustainable,” said Mark Widmar, chief executive officer, First Solar.

 30 August 2022 11:06

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the death of coal one solar panel at a time..........................

 

cropped-new-electrek-logo.png

 

US shipments of solar panels – including imports, exports, and domestically produced and shipped panels – rose to a record electricity-generating capacity of 28.8 million peak kilowatts (kW) in 2021, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). That was up from 21.8 million peak kW in 2020.

 

In 2021, about 80% of US solar panel module shipments were imports, and they primarily came from Asia.

The EIA notes of its data reporting:

US solar panel shipments closely track domestic solar capacity additions; differences between the two usually result from the lag time between shipment and installation. We categorize solar capacity additions as either utility-scale (facilities with 1 megawatt of capacity or more) or small-scale (largely residential solar installations).

The United States added 13.2 gigawatts (GW) of utility-scale solar capacity in 2021. That was an annual record, and it was 25% more than the 10.6 GW of utility-scale solar added in 2020.

Small-scale solar capacity installations in the United States increased by 5.4 GW in 2021, up 23% from 2020, which saw 4.4 GW added. Residential installations made up more than 3.9 GW of small-scale installations in 2021, compared with 2.9 GW in 2020.

As Electrek reported on August 29, Bloomberg NEF (BNEF) reported that US homeowners are expected to install a record 5.6 GW of residential solar in 2022. BNEF predicts that residential solar will outpace commercial solar every year to 2030.

In 2021, five states accounted for 46% of all US solar panel shipments. The top five states were:

  1. California (5.09 million peak kW)
  2. Texas (4.31 million peak kW)
  3. Florida (1.80 million peak kW)
  4. Georgia (1.15 million peak kW)
  5. Illinois (1.12 million peak kW)

Electrek’s Take

To state the obvious, solar is only going to keep growing in the United States, and there are a number of reasons for this. Electricity costs and fossil fuel prices are surging, and they’re not expected to drop. Contrast this with the declining cost of solar panels, which dropped 11% from 2020 to 2021. And that’s despite project delays and supply chain problems and things like the US Department of Commerce investigation into solar manufacturing in Southeast Asia.

When homeowners buy a solar plus battery storage system, the payments are set over the course of whatever number of years they choose to pay it off, if they don’t pay cash up front. And those payments won’t go up – unlike the cost of electricity or fuels like propane or oil. (This, plus my desire to reduce our emissions, is one of the reasons why I’m about to put solar panels on my roof, along with two Tesla Powerwalls.)

And, the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act is expected to create a clean energy boom. Just yesterday, we reported that First Solar, the largest US solar panel maker, announced that it will invest up to $1.2 billion to ramp up production of US-made solar panels. The company’s CEO cited the Inflation Reduction Act as a catalyst for the announcement. Many more new domestic clean energy manufacturing initiatives are bound to follow from other companies.

We look forward to EIA’s report on solar panel shipments in 2021 this time next year. It will undoubtedly set a new record.

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On 9/2/2022 at 5:23 PM, notsonice said:

 

the death of coal one solar panel at a time..........................

 

cropped-new-electrek-logo.png

 

US shipments of solar panels – including imports, exports, and domestically produced and shipped panels – rose to a record electricity-generating capacity of 28.8 million peak kilowatts (kW) in 2021, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). That was up from 21.8 million peak kW in 2020.

 

In 2021, about 80% of US solar panel module shipments were imports, and they primarily came from Asia.

The EIA notes of its data reporting:

US solar panel shipments closely track domestic solar capacity additions; differences between the two usually result from the lag time between shipment and installation. We categorize solar capacity additions as either utility-scale (facilities with 1 megawatt of capacity or more) or small-scale (largely residential solar installations).

The United States added 13.2 gigawatts (GW) of utility-scale solar capacity in 2021. That was an annual record, and it was 25% more than the 10.6 GW of utility-scale solar added in 2020.

Small-scale solar capacity installations in the United States increased by 5.4 GW in 2021, up 23% from 2020, which saw 4.4 GW added. Residential installations made up more than 3.9 GW of small-scale installations in 2021, compared with 2.9 GW in 2020.

As Electrek reported on August 29, Bloomberg NEF (BNEF) reported that US homeowners are expected to install a record 5.6 GW of residential solar in 2022. BNEF predicts that residential solar will outpace commercial solar every year to 2030.

In 2021, five states accounted for 46% of all US solar panel shipments. The top five states were:

  1. California (5.09 million peak kW)
  2. Texas (4.31 million peak kW)
  3. Florida (1.80 million peak kW)
  4. Georgia (1.15 million peak kW)
  5. Illinois (1.12 million peak kW)

Electrek’s Take

To state the obvious, solar is only going to keep growing in the United States, and there are a number of reasons for this. Electricity costs and fossil fuel prices are surging, and they’re not expected to drop. Contrast this with the declining cost of solar panels, which dropped 11% from 2020 to 2021. And that’s despite project delays and supply chain problems and things like the US Department of Commerce investigation into solar manufacturing in Southeast Asia.

When homeowners buy a solar plus battery storage system, the payments are set over the course of whatever number of years they choose to pay it off, if they don’t pay cash up front. And those payments won’t go up – unlike the cost of electricity or fuels like propane or oil. (This, plus my desire to reduce our emissions, is one of the reasons why I’m about to put solar panels on my roof, along with two Tesla Powerwalls.)

And, the recently passed Inflation Reduction Act is expected to create a clean energy boom. Just yesterday, we reported that First Solar, the largest US solar panel maker, announced that it will invest up to $1.2 billion to ramp up production of US-made solar panels. The company’s CEO cited the Inflation Reduction Act as a catalyst for the announcement. Many more new domestic clean energy manufacturing initiatives are bound to follow from other companies.

We look forward to EIA’s report on solar panel shipments in 2021 this time next year. It will undoubtedly set a new record.

If solar panel has existed for more than 60 to 80 years, there is a reason why it is not yet popular. Until you overcome the shortcoming(s), each careless hasten step taken would bring incessant problems ahead.....

massive number of solar panels installation bound to create foreseeable unintended consequences.......... e.g. shortage of raw material, problems of disposal, low efficiency when over heated or under heated, changes to biosphere nearby, land slide over sites on high land etc.

 

shall there is an urgent need to get renewable going, how about creating a water reservoir or a few? You can use that as drinking water, irrigation and for power supply. It might help to mitigate unwanted impact of climate change and water shortage too.

image.png.b6cc46a622da42f33c61977fe7403c3c.png

 

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11 hours ago, specinho said:

If solar panel has existed for more than 60 to 80 years, there is a reason why it is not yet popular. Until you overcome the shortcoming(s), each careless hasten step taken would bring incessant problems ahead.....

massive number of solar panels installation bound to create foreseeable unintended consequences.......... e.g. shortage of raw material, problems of disposal, low efficiency when over heated or under heated, changes to biosphere nearby, land slide over sites on high land etc.

 

shall there is an urgent need to get renewable going, how about creating a water reservoir or a few? You can use that as drinking water, irrigation and for power supply. It might help to mitigate unwanted impact of climate change and water shortage too.

image.png.b6cc46a622da42f33c61977fe7403c3c.png

 

If solar panel has existed for more than 60 to 80 years, there is a reason why it is not yet popular.??????

 

price......now they are popular

$76.67 per watt in 1977

18 cents per watt in 2020 or about $60 for a 350 watt solar panel

 

and now the death of coal completed by  billions of  solar panels, happening alot faster than you think

US shipments of solar panels – including imports, exports, and domestically produced and shipped panels – rose to a record electricity-generating capacity of 28.8 million peak kilowatts (kW) in 2021, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). That was up from 21.8 million peak kW in 2020.

 

means the installation of 80 million solar panels in the US alone in 2021.....not popular??????

you jest.

 

 

have you not been paying attention to the business at all????

You must live under a rock

 

image.png.1891c114e4aa7335d9f60504c15a0c49.png

 

image.png.7bce0400fe54f92b41690f1190d26d01.png

Edited by notsonice

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(edited)

On 9/5/2022 at 2:57 PM, notsonice said:

If solar panel has existed for more than 60 to 80 years, there is a reason why it is not yet popular.??????

 

price......now they are popular

$76.67 per watt in 1977

18 cents per watt in 2020 or about $60 for a 350 watt solar panel

 

and now the death of coal completed by  billions of  solar panels, happening alot faster than you think

US shipments of solar panels – including imports, exports, and domestically produced and shipped panels – rose to a record electricity-generating capacity of 28.8 million peak kilowatts (kW) in 2021, according to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA). That was up from 21.8 million peak kW in 2020.

 

means the installation of 80 million solar panels in the US alone in 2021.....not popular??????

you jest.

 

 

have you not been paying attention to the business at all????

You must live under a rock

 

image.png.1891c114e4aa7335d9f60504c15a0c49.png

 

image.png.7bce0400fe54f92b41690f1190d26d01.png

image.png.2fb7382d63f60efb341a49b2e193cd75.png

1.       imagine what you need for a solar panel........ silica, metal conductor, metal frame, metal wiring etc.... With soaring prices of metal, sand and labour, how do you think the cost is reduced?

        Do you know how is the cost calculated? Per size of individual panel in 1977 vs massive panel divided into individual panel now?

        The heart of administration should to the people. Not particular agenda, policy, movement etc. What the people need is low cost or free energy. Generation of energy is best from free natural resources. The sun, although free, is affected by geographical location. Not every place is suitable. Probably only along the equator where sunlight is available most time of the year? But, over there, they have plenty of rain too. This make hydro a less damaging choice.

      Pretend data can only bring superficial display, not real solution to a problem......

 

 

Edited by specinho

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14 minutes ago, specinho said:

image.png.2fb7382d63f60efb341a49b2e193cd75.png

1.       imagine what you need for a solar panel........ silica, metal conductor, metal frame, metal wiring etc.... With soaring prices of metal, sand and labour, how do you think the cost is reduced?

        Do you know how is the cost calculated? Per size of individual panel in 1977 vs massive panel divided into individual panel now?

        The heart of administration should to the people. Not particular agenda, policy, movement etc. What the people need is low cost or free energy. Generation of energy is best from free natural resources. The sun, although free, is affected by geographical location. Not every place is suitable. Probably only along the equator where sunlight is available most time of the year? But, over there, they have plenty of rain too. This make hydro a less damaging choice.

      Pretend data can only bring superficial display, not real solution to a problem......

 

 

what are you babbling about now???

Do you know how is the cost calculated?

 

of course , it is by $ per Watt output per panel

pretty simple metric

and your comment......Generation of energy is best from free natural resources. ???

Yep sunshine is free which is driving solar electricity generation even in places with less than perfect sunshine as solar power now is one of the cheapest sources of electricty.

Enjoy

 

 

 

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(edited)

8 hours ago, specinho said:

image.png.2fb7382d63f60efb341a49b2e193cd75.png

1.       imagine what you need for a solar panel........ silica, metal conductor, metal frame, metal wiring etc.... With soaring prices of metal, sand and labour, how do you think the cost is reduced?

        Do you know how is the cost calculated? Per size of individual panel in 1977 vs massive panel divided into individual panel now?

        The heart of administration should to the people. Not particular agenda, policy, movement etc. What the people need is low cost or free energy. Generation of energy is best from free natural resources. The sun, although free, is affected by geographical location. Not every place is suitable. Probably only along the equator where sunlight is available most time of the year? But, over there, they have plenty of rain too. This make hydro a less damaging choice.

      Pretend data can only bring superficial display, not real solution to a problem......

 

 

Soaring prices of metal?

Steel and copper are way down on the year:

image.thumb.png.2cdb6e29af809034bbc02f0c0e75ab3c.png

image.png.e31dd0415e814e495799cf0fab4b00d6.png

Edited by Jay McKinsey

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Between China and o’l Sleepy the shot in the arm of money will make up for raised supply chain costs and demand overwhelming supply chains. Nothing like 10’s of billions to put people to work. 
The semi truck is a curious example where range is still weak while battery companies tout breakthroughs. You would think leading semi makers could easily pair with leading battery makers and drive that range up. Anybody have any new news?

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On 9/7/2022 at 12:50 PM, Boat said:

Between China and o’l Sleepy the shot in the arm of money will make up for raised supply chain costs and demand overwhelming supply chains. Nothing like 10’s of billions to put people to work. 
The semi truck is a curious example where range is still weak while battery companies tout breakthroughs. You would think leading semi makers could easily pair with leading battery makers and drive that range up. Anybody have any new news?

This is a very interesting concept, but concept is all it is.

If they can get to a working battery then it could be the future, but thats a long long way off

https://phys.org/news/2022-08-stable-quantum-batteries-reliably-energy.html

https://phys.org/news/2022-03-quantum-technology-electric-cars-fast.html

https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg25534030-800-quantum-batteries-strange-technology-that-could-provide-instant-power/?utm_source=onesignal&utm_medium=push&utm_campaign=2022-09-08-Quantum-batteri

Edited by Rob Plant

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On 9/7/2022 at 11:53 AM, Jay McKinsey said:

Soaring prices of metal?

Steel and copper are way down on the year:

 

 

 

there is a possibility that what you see as a shadow or interpreted image might not always represent reality. If we do not have the real image in front of us,  most of us would probably get it wrong.....

More than 10 years ago, steel was probably USD 70 or 80 per tonne ~ RM 0.30 per kg. 5 years ago, it was USD 140 to 180 ~ RM 0.60 per kg. Now, the price is 500 to 800 ~ RM 2 per kg.....

Fully trusting on the expertise of others might no longer be a virtue... 'n'

misinterpretation edited.jpg

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(edited)

1 hour ago, specinho said:

 

 

there is a possibility that what you see as a shadow or interpreted image might not always represent reality. If we do not have the real image in front of us,  most of us would probably get it wrong.....

More than 10 years ago, steel was probably USD 70 or 80 per tonne ~ RM 0.30 per kg. 5 years ago, it was USD 140 to 180 ~ RM 0.60 per kg. Now, the price is 500 to 800 ~ RM 2 per kg.....

Fully trusting on the expertise of others might no longer be a virtue... 'n'

misinterpretation edited.jpg

So you are claiming that the hard objective market numbers don't represent reality. No, you got it wrong. Steel is now a little above its ten year average and 10 years ago today steel was $610/tn.:

image.png.51d1d14868dde0741e6ff71adc70ba81.png

 

Edited by Jay McKinsey
  • Upvote 1

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(edited)

1 hour ago, specinho said:

 

 

there is a possibility that what you see as a shadow or interpreted image might not always represent reality. If we do not have the real image in front of us,  most of us would probably get it wrong.....

More than 10 years ago, steel was probably USD 70 or 80 per tonne ~ RM 0.30 per kg. 5 years ago, it was USD 140 to 180 ~ RM 0.60 per kg. Now, the price is 500 to 800 ~ RM 2 per kg.....

Fully trusting on the expertise of others might no longer be a virtue... 'n'

misinterpretation edited.jpg

More than 10 years ago, steel was probably USD 70 or 80 per tonne ~ RM 0.30 per kg. 5 years ago, it was USD 140 to 180 ~ RM 0.60 per kg????

 

 

maybe for scrap.....

 

70 to 80 per tonne for steel ????

USD 70 or 80 per tonne???? late 50's early 1960's

 

cars cost new less than $3000 back then also...average in 1960 was $2600

 

do a little research before you post, if you do not you will be in the same class as EcoChump....the King of the Babbling BSers'

Edited by notsonice
  • Upvote 1

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(edited)

As I have said before, it is REALLY hard to compete  with an electric generator that consumes ZERO fuel, consumes almost ZERO water, produces ZERO operational waste, and requires less "heads per MWh".

Except with another  generator that does the same...

Edited by turbguy

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13 hours ago, notsonice said:

maybe for scrap.....

Yep thats probably what he meant, as $70/t for steel is fantasy land, multiply by 10.

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On 3/16/2022 at 11:04 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

In regard to renewable energy? Absolutely I do. 

That might explain why my numbers are right and your numbers are almost always wrong.

I think the reason you won't post the article is because you know it is mostly BS.

Jay why are you not working for the United Nations if you’re knowledge is so valuable and so important with regards to renewable energies! 

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