Pakistan: "Heart" Of Terrorism and Global Threat

According to latest report from AP, Pakistani terror cells are still biggest threat not just for that country, but also for the entire region. New departments of death probably were "born" on border line between Afghan and Pakistan. By declarative, Pakistan is committed to combating terrorism, but in practice terrorism lives there. IS, name of terror group,  is a deadly new front in Pakistan’s decades-old terror war. Interesting, according to the info from expert for terrorism and police services, that some members of this terror cell were part of financing school sistem from Saudi Arabia. "Many are financed by oil-rich Saudi Arabia to promote the rigid Wahabi sect of Islam practiced in the kingdom, Chandio said. The origin of the money, whether from the Saudi government or Saudi philanthropists, is not clear but the teachings at these schools espouse a rigid interpretation of Islam and the superiority of Sunni Islam".

Obviously, Pakistan has a "image of paradise" for terrorist leader and militant groups.
 

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From before, we know that Pakistani intelligence agencies are behind many of terror attacks in that region... They use militants for their aims.

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The state "cover" all of this. Best example: 

"Hafiz Saeed, the co-founder of Lashkar-e-Taiba, who has a $10 million U.S.-imposed bounty on his head, lives unrestricted in Lahore, the capital of Pakistan’s Punjab province, where 60 per cent of the country’s 200 million people live. Just last month the U.S. State Department declared another of the group’s senior commanders, Abdul Rehman al-Dakhil, a global terrorist, who poses “a significant risk of committing acts of terrorism that threaten the security of U.S. nationals or the national security, foreign policy, or economy of the United States. Dakhil, who also now lives freely in Lahore, was arrested in Iraq in 2004 and held in U.S. custody in Iraq and Afghanistan until 2014, when he was returned to Pakistan, where he spent a brief stint in prison before being released"  
Terrorist are still part of daily life: neighbors, sellers, drivers... Of course it's not a whole nation, or whole ethnic group...

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Terrorists anywhere must not be spared. Otherwise, we're all in trouble.

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New government and Imran Khan has a chance to remove terrorist and terrorism from its land.. I will not say Khan is, maybe, last chance for Pakistan, but it looks like it is...  

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Meantime, macroeconomic issues lead the way in Pakistan's top risks identified in a central bank survey from start of the year. Interestingly, energy and terrorism right at the bottom.... With their support of terrorism, very soon they will not have economy problem.... 

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1 hour ago, damirUSBiH said:

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I can't help but notice #1: Deterioration of BOP. 

I now need to borrow one of Tom's tried and true techniques:

/rant on

I mean, seriously?  How is it that the Pakistanis, of all people, are smart enough to understand the negative impact of trade deficits, but the average US voter is highly likely to not even know what BOP stands for, let alone formulate a rationally articulated opinion on said topic.  In fact, the Pakistanis even went so far as to place deteriorating BOP as their #1 threat (which it probably is).  In the defense of the Pakistanis, deteriorating BOP is probably every country's #1 threat, as was most recently demonstrated by Venezuela when their balance of payments collapsed in late 2014.  But back to the rant...  The Pakistanis are most certainly concerned about their BOP, and yet they have only run a trade deficit since 2003, whereas the US has run a trade deficit since 1983 (excluding only 1991, where the US had 1 year of surplus).  If I walked into a mall (or the local polling place for that matter) and asked 100 random Americans their thoughts on US BOP, I would probably get 100 blank stares followed by 100 questions asking me to explain what BOP means.  What is worse still is the fact that those same 100 out of 100 Americans could easily form an opinion about the Kardashians or fidget spinners, which are both, in comparison, utterly meaningless to the future of the US.  

...aaaugh!!!    

It is days like this that I feel like I'm in the Twilight zone.

/rant off

That actually felt pretty good to get out.  Thanks Tom for sharing your techniques with me! 

And as always, if you are a US citizen, don't forget to take your blue pill and have a nice day ;) 

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18 hours ago, Epic said:

...aaaugh!!!    

It is days like this that I feel like I'm in the Twilight zone.

/rant off

Nicely done, Epic  : )

Sometimes it's good to cut loose for a bit.

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