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2 hours ago, RichieRich216 said:

Do they even have a towing range, LMFAO!

I see you are babbling BS again

LMFAO at the tards who think that only ICE vehicles can run out of gas and then get roadside assistance...

Enjoy dwelling in your BS babble

 

PS have you heard of AAA?

 

1. AAA Roadside Assistance

The American Automobile Association, or AAA, is a membership-based service that offers roadside assistance and mobile charging solution for electric vehicles. It's one of the largest roadside services, with a fleet of 63,000 towing and service trucks across the US and Canada.

Last year, AAA started adding the SparkCharge Roadie to its fleet as a portable charging solution for EVs. SparkCharge is the first company that offers a "charging-as-a-service" solution to EV owners. It uses a modular unit built up of battery modules with lithium-Ion cells. When stacked, the battery modules can deliver a battery charge of about a mile per minute.

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I'll be sure to get “ Spark Charge Rodie..... How funny! We can't even supply houses with enough heat, and fucking greenies are still pushing EV!

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11 minutes ago, RichieRich216 said:

I'll be sure to get “ Spark Charge Rodie..... How funny! We can't even supply houses with enough heat, and fucking greenies are still pushing EV!

I see your babbling again.....guess your whole comment....Do they even have a towing range, LMFAO! was just a comment made in ignorance.......

Then you resort to more babble.......fucking greenies are still pushing EV

 

boy it must suck to be you........crying about how you are a victim all the time

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The only “victim” is you and the sad life you must lead, So you read the BOLD headline but failed to read the text of the Bill!

If you want to discuss a topic, have some knowledge about it, or have your mom read you the text instead of Bambi when putting you to bed, speaking of which, it is after 10 PM EST, so I am guessing your mother already turned off your double wide home bedroom light, but by your postings, you're probably jerking off to a national geographic magazine under the covers.

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On 8/30/2022 at 9:16 PM, markslawson said:

Green energy zealots have been so busy trying to avoid a projected (and probably illusory) climate Armageddon by promoting renewable energy and relentlessly demonising fossil fuels to the point where investment in such projects in advanced countries is drying up, that they have brought on a very real energy Armageddon. The activists are not to blame for the trigger point, of course, the Russian-Ukraine war and Russian weaponising of gas on top of a surge in demand and wind droughts in Europe. The problem is that they have pushed energy supply systems to the point where large shocks can turn into energy disasters. Gas and coal prices go through the roof, and renewable energy fails miserably as a substitute for renewable energy.

This is particularly evident in Britain. Here is a sample of some recent articles. They are mostly behind paywalls so I can't link them, but you should get the idea from the excerpts.

Sunday Times, August 28

Business leaders have warned of a jobs bloodbath as soaring energy bills threaten to force hotels to close for the winter, pubs to slash their opening hours and factories to shut down.

The starkest estimates put the number of jobs at risk in hospitality at 500,000, while thousands more are under threat in industry and agriculture as employers increasingly find that it costs more to stay open than it does to close.

The Times, 29 August 2022

After 20 years of government-promoted eco-socialism half of Tory voters want energy to be nationalised

Nearly half of Conservative voters support the renationalisation of Britain’s energy industry, a poll has found, putting pressure on the incoming prime minister to embrace radical solutions to the cost of living crisis.
 
Forty-seven per cent of Tory voters favour returning the energy companies to public ownership, with 28 per cent opposed to such a move and 25 per cent unsure. Among those who voted for the Conservatives in 2019, including many in the red wall seats of the northeast and the Midlands, the figure rises to 53 per cent in favour of renationalisation.

The figures, from a YouGov poll conducted for The Times, provide a stark illustration of the choices facing squeezed households after it was announced that energy bills will rise to an average of £3,549 a year from October. Economists and energy experts urged the government to take action to avoid widespread blackouts this winter.


The Independent, 27 August 2022
UK faces ‘catastrophe’ after energy bills soar 80% amid warning price cap could hit £7,000
The government has been warned that lives will be put at risk unless it takes urgent action

The scale of the squeeze Britons face on their incomes has been laid bare, with the energy price cap confirmed to increase average bills by more than 80 per cent in October – and forecasts predicting annual costs of £7,000 by April.

Regulator Ofgem has revealed that the price cap, which is supposed to protect consumers from unfair energy bill increases, will rise to £3,549 per year for an average household – more than three times last winter’s level. That is expected to leave some 8.9 million households in fuel poverty, charity bosses have said, with a “real risk” that children will go hungry as Britain’s poorest see almost half of their income taken up by gas and electricity.

There's lots more where that came from but you get the idea. The ruling Tory party is said to face a wipe out at the next election unless it does something about all of this, starting with ending all support for green projects. In the UK energy bills include some sort of impost for renewable energy, I suspect that's not going to last. This Armageddon has yet to reach Australia, at least not in force, but another huge coal powered plant is due to close next year and already the grid is showing signs of major strain. The worst may be yet to come. 

The text and claim you make are all valid; the greenies are in such denial that any headlines that push there hallucinated fantasy on this subject is beyond their comprehension! 

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Though this platform is on the WWW, the greenies seem to navigate to it to get some personal satisfaction they lack in knowledge, education, and ability to see the forest from the trees.

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18 hours ago, RichieRich216 said:

Though this platform is on the WWW, the greenies seem to navigate to it to get some personal satisfaction they lack in knowledge, education, and ability to see the forest from the trees.

Watching you make a fool of yourself is funny!

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So you're saying that you don't have the balls to put money where your mouth is!

See I am confident that this bill like many other in the past will die on the vine, especially since its been indicated to Congress that between 30-40% current IRS agents own back taxes.

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(edited)

On 11/18/2022 at 5:33 PM, RichieRich216 said:

Do they even have a towing range, LMFAO!

Have you heard of the Rivian?

faster than a Dodge Viper in a drag race too!

Capability at a glance¹
  • Drivetrain

    All-Wheel Drive
  • 0-60 mph

    3 secs
  • Towing capacity

    Up to 11,000 lbs
  • Wading depth

    3+ ft
  • https://rivian.com/r1t
Edited by Rob Plant

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Politicians praise electric cars. If everyone buys them, they say, solar and wind power will replace our need for oil.

But that’s absurd.

Here is the rest of my list of “inconvenient facts” about electric cars.

“The future of the auto industry is electric,” says President Biden. He assumes a vast improvement in batteries. Better batteries are crucial because both power plants and cars need to store lots of electric power.

But here’s inconvenient Fact 3: Batteries are lousy at storing large amounts of energy.

“Batteries leak, and they don’t hold a lot,”says physicist Mark Mills.

Mills thinks electric cars are great but explains that “oil begins with a huge advantage: 5,000% more energy in it per pound. Electric car batteries weigh 1,000 pounds. Those 1,000 pounds replace just 80 pounds of gasoline.”

But future batteries will be better, I point out.

“Engineers are really good at making things better,” Mills responds, “but they can’t make them better than the laws of physics permit.”

That’s inconvenient Fact 4. Miracle batteries powerful enough to replace fossil fuels are a fantasy.

“Because nature is not nice to humans,” explains Mills, “we store energy for when it’s cold or really hot. People who imagine an energy transition want to build windmills and solar panels and store all that energy in batteries. But if you do the arithmetic, you find you’d need to build about a hundred trillion dollars’ worth of batteries to store the same amount of energy that Europe has in storage now for this winter. It would take the world’s battery factories 400 years to manufacture that many batteries.”

Politicians don’t mention that when they promise every car will be electric. They also don’t mention that the electric grid is limited.

This summer, California officials were so worried about blackouts, they asked electric vehicle owners to stop charging cars!

Yet today, few of California’s cars are electric. Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered that all new cars must be electric by 2035! Where does he think he’ll get the electricity to power them?

“Roughly speaking, you have to double your electric grid to move the energy out of gasoline into the electric sector,” says Mills. “No one is planning to double the electric grid, so they’ll be rationing.”

Rationing. That means some places will simply turn off some of the power. That’s our final inconvenient fact: We just don’t have enough electricity for all electric cars.

Worse, if (as many activists and politicians propose) we try to get that electricity from 100% renewable sources, the rationing would be deadly.

Even if you added “Washington Monument-sized wind turbines spread over an area six times greater than the state of New York, that wouldn’t be enough.”

This is just math and physics. It’s amazing that supposedly responsible people promote impossible fantasies.

“It’s been an extraordinary accomplishment of propaganda,” complains Mills, “almost infantile … distressing because it’s so silly.”

Even if people invent much better cars, wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and batteries, explains Mills, “you’re still drilling things, digging up stuff. You’re still building machines that wear out … It’s not magical transformation.”

Even worse, today politicians make us pay more for energy while forcing us to do things that hurt the environment. Their restrictions on fossil fuels drive people to use fuels that pollute more.

In Europe, “They’re going back to burning coal! What we’ve done is have our energy systems designed by bureaucrats instead of engineers,” complains Mills. “We get worse energy, more expensive energy and higher environmental impacts!

There’ll be lots more electric cars in the future,” concludes Mills. “There should be, because that’ll reduce demand for oil, which is a good thing. But when you do the math, to operate a society with 5 or 6 billion people who are living in poverty we can’t imagine, when you want to give them a little of what we have, the energy demands are off-the-charts big. We’re going to need everything.”

That includes fossil fuels!

 

 / 

The largest automaker in North America is laying down a marker for itself to sell 1 million EVs annually by 2025. But it won’t be easy.

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1 hour ago, RichieRich216 said:

Politicians praise electric cars. If everyone buys them, they say, solar and wind power will replace our need for oil.

But that’s absurd.

Here is the rest of my list of “inconvenient facts” about electric cars.

“The future of the auto industry is electric,” says President Biden. He assumes a vast improvement in batteries. Better batteries are crucial because both power plants and cars need to store lots of electric power.

But here’s inconvenient Fact 3: Batteries are lousy at storing large amounts of energy.

“Batteries leak, and they don’t hold a lot,”says physicist Mark Mills.

Mills thinks electric cars are great but explains that “oil begins with a huge advantage: 5,000% more energy in it per pound. Electric car batteries weigh 1,000 pounds. Those 1,000 pounds replace just 80 pounds of gasoline.”

But future batteries will be better, I point out.

“Engineers are really good at making things better,” Mills responds, “but they can’t make them better than the laws of physics permit.”

That’s inconvenient Fact 4. Miracle batteries powerful enough to replace fossil fuels are a fantasy.

“Because nature is not nice to humans,” explains Mills, “we store energy for when it’s cold or really hot. People who imagine an energy transition want to build windmills and solar panels and store all that energy in batteries. But if you do the arithmetic, you find you’d need to build about a hundred trillion dollars’ worth of batteries to store the same amount of energy that Europe has in storage now for this winter. It would take the world’s battery factories 400 years to manufacture that many batteries.”

Politicians don’t mention that when they promise every car will be electric. They also don’t mention that the electric grid is limited.

This summer, California officials were so worried about blackouts, they asked electric vehicle owners to stop charging cars!

Yet today, few of California’s cars are electric. Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered that all new cars must be electric by 2035! Where does he think he’ll get the electricity to power them?

“Roughly speaking, you have to double your electric grid to move the energy out of gasoline into the electric sector,” says Mills. “No one is planning to double the electric grid, so they’ll be rationing.”

Rationing. That means some places will simply turn off some of the power. That’s our final inconvenient fact: We just don’t have enough electricity for all electric cars.

Worse, if (as many activists and politicians propose) we try to get that electricity from 100% renewable sources, the rationing would be deadly.

Even if you added “Washington Monument-sized wind turbines spread over an area six times greater than the state of New York, that wouldn’t be enough.”

This is just math and physics. It’s amazing that supposedly responsible people promote impossible fantasies.

“It’s been an extraordinary accomplishment of propaganda,” complains Mills, “almost infantile … distressing because it’s so silly.”

Even if people invent much better cars, wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and batteries, explains Mills, “you’re still drilling things, digging up stuff. You’re still building machines that wear out … It’s not magical transformation.”

Even worse, today politicians make us pay more for energy while forcing us to do things that hurt the environment. Their restrictions on fossil fuels drive people to use fuels that pollute more.

In Europe, “They’re going back to burning coal! What we’ve done is have our energy systems designed by bureaucrats instead of engineers,” complains Mills. “We get worse energy, more expensive energy and higher environmental impacts!

There’ll be lots more electric cars in the future,” concludes Mills. “There should be, because that’ll reduce demand for oil, which is a good thing. But when you do the math, to operate a society with 5 or 6 billion people who are living in poverty we can’t imagine, when you want to give them a little of what we have, the energy demands are off-the-charts big. We’re going to need everything.”

That includes fossil fuels!

 

 / 

The largest automaker in North America is laying down a marker for itself to sell 1 million EVs annually by 2025. But it won’t be easy.

The battery doesn't replace 80lbs of fuel it replaces 80lbs a week for the life of the vehicle. You bozos keep forgetting that batteries aren't consumables like fuel and that they can be recycled unlike fuel.

People in CA were asked not to charge their cars between 4pm and 9pm for a few days. It was a complete and total non issue.

Tesla already sells 1 million EVs annually as does BYD. Others will be there soon. 

If you actually understood how batteries work you would be amazed at how rapidly they are advancing.

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1 hour ago, RichieRich216 said:

Politicians praise electric cars. If everyone buys them, they say, solar and wind power will replace our need for oil.

But that’s absurd.

Here is the rest of my list of “inconvenient facts” about electric cars.

“The future of the auto industry is electric,” says President Biden. He assumes a vast improvement in batteries. Better batteries are crucial because both power plants and cars need to store lots of electric power.

But here’s inconvenient Fact 3: Batteries are lousy at storing large amounts of energy.

“Batteries leak, and they don’t hold a lot,”says physicist Mark Mills.

Mills thinks electric cars are great but explains that “oil begins with a huge advantage: 5,000% more energy in it per pound. Electric car batteries weigh 1,000 pounds. Those 1,000 pounds replace just 80 pounds of gasoline.”

But future batteries will be better, I point out.

“Engineers are really good at making things better,” Mills responds, “but they can’t make them better than the laws of physics permit.”

That’s inconvenient Fact 4. Miracle batteries powerful enough to replace fossil fuels are a fantasy.

“Because nature is not nice to humans,” explains Mills, “we store energy for when it’s cold or really hot. People who imagine an energy transition want to build windmills and solar panels and store all that energy in batteries. But if you do the arithmetic, you find you’d need to build about a hundred trillion dollars’ worth of batteries to store the same amount of energy that Europe has in storage now for this winter. It would take the world’s battery factories 400 years to manufacture that many batteries.”

Politicians don’t mention that when they promise every car will be electric. They also don’t mention that the electric grid is limited.

This summer, California officials were so worried about blackouts, they asked electric vehicle owners to stop charging cars!

Yet today, few of California’s cars are electric. Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered that all new cars must be electric by 2035! Where does he think he’ll get the electricity to power them?

“Roughly speaking, you have to double your electric grid to move the energy out of gasoline into the electric sector,” says Mills. “No one is planning to double the electric grid, so they’ll be rationing.”

Rationing. That means some places will simply turn off some of the power. That’s our final inconvenient fact: We just don’t have enough electricity for all electric cars.

Worse, if (as many activists and politicians propose) we try to get that electricity from 100% renewable sources, the rationing would be deadly.

Even if you added “Washington Monument-sized wind turbines spread over an area six times greater than the state of New York, that wouldn’t be enough.”

This is just math and physics. It’s amazing that supposedly responsible people promote impossible fantasies.

“It’s been an extraordinary accomplishment of propaganda,” complains Mills, “almost infantile … distressing because it’s so silly.”

Even if people invent much better cars, wind turbines, solar panels, power lines and batteries, explains Mills, “you’re still drilling things, digging up stuff. You’re still building machines that wear out … It’s not magical transformation.”

Even worse, today politicians make us pay more for energy while forcing us to do things that hurt the environment. Their restrictions on fossil fuels drive people to use fuels that pollute more.

In Europe, “They’re going back to burning coal! What we’ve done is have our energy systems designed by bureaucrats instead of engineers,” complains Mills. “We get worse energy, more expensive energy and higher environmental impacts!

There’ll be lots more electric cars in the future,” concludes Mills. “There should be, because that’ll reduce demand for oil, which is a good thing. But when you do the math, to operate a society with 5 or 6 billion people who are living in poverty we can’t imagine, when you want to give them a little of what we have, the energy demands are off-the-charts big. We’re going to need everything.”

That includes fossil fuels!

 

 / 

The largest automaker in North America is laying down a marker for itself to sell 1 million EVs annually by 2025. But it won’t be easy.

Mills thinks electric cars are great but explains that “oil begins with a huge advantage: 5,000% more energy in it per pound. Electric car batteries weigh 1,000 pounds. Those 1,000 pounds replace just 80 pounds of gasoline.”????

 

thanks for posting BS garbage from one of your babbling idiot pals

Here is what your babbling idiot pal forgot in his math.................. an ICE vehicle needs an engine/transfer case/exhaust system  that weighs over 1000 pounds compared to an EV that has an electric motor/transfer case that weighs 200 pounds

 

ICE advantage gone

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2 hours ago, Jay McKinsey said:

The battery doesn't replace 80lbs of fuel it replaces 80lbs a week for the life of the vehicle. You bozos keep forgetting that batteries aren't consumables like fuel and that they can be recycled unlike fuel.

People in CA were asked not to charge their cars between 4pm and 9pm for a few days. It was a complete and total non issue.

Tesla already sells 1 million EVs annually as does BYD. Others will be there soon. 

If you actually understood how batteries work you would be amazed at how rapidly they are advancing.

Find, mine, transport, separate, process, ship to next phase for building, group and set current strpicture, package, load, transport to car manufacturers, offload, stage and stoare, install.

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On 11/21/2022 at 9:06 PM, RichieRich216 said:

Find, mine, transport, separate, process, ship to next phase for building, group and set current strpicture, package, load, transport to car manufacturers, offload, stage and stoare, install.

How is that different for oil?

find, mine, separate, transport to refinery, store, refine, store, load, transport, offload, fill up. 

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On 11/21/2022 at 6:35 PM, Jay McKinsey said:

The battery doesn't replace 80lbs of fuel it replaces 80lbs a week for the life of the vehicle. You bozos keep forgetting that batteries aren't consumables like fuel and that they can be recycled unlike fuel.

People in CA were asked not to charge their cars between 4pm and 9pm for a few days. It was a complete and total non issue.

Tesla already sells 1 million EVs annually as does BYD. Others will be there soon. 

If you actually understood how batteries work you would be amazed at how rapidly they are advancing.

Europe does not go back to coal because of EVs, but because of a lack of natural gas. Power consumption is going down in Europe, but gas deliveries have gone down even quicker.

Also, everyone says that EV will bring the grid to a grinding halt. I can easily show that that is not the case. 

The average car in Europe drives 14,000 km/year, the average American car 14,000 mls/year. A Tesla 3 has an average consumption of 16kWh/100km, or 2200 kWh/year in EU, or 3500 kWh/year in the USA. Or between 7-10kWh/day. With 1.5 cars per household on average and about 70-80% home charging, that would be about 7-10kWh per day/household.

The average household in the USA consumes 30kWh/day: that extra 7kWh/day, built up over 15 years, is not going to break the net. Between 1950-2000 household consumption grew by about a factor of 10 (a 1000% increase), here we are looking at at 3-4% growth year-on-year.

in Europe house-hold consumption is about 10kWh/day. There we would need to look at a more sizeable increase in capacity. This can only be done by (temporary) load-balancing, i.e. most charging needs to happen during the cheap/abundant hours (daytime in summer, night-time in winter). Variable tariffs can be used to get to that desired outcome. Fortunately, cars are parked for at least 23 hours a day anyway, so charging can happen anytime. Tt would mean not only building charging infrastructure at home (which most people will have anyway) but also at work locations, like requiring car parks with solar roofs. And guess what: France has just done this.

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On 11/21/2022 at 3:20 AM, Rob Plant said:

Have you heard of the Rivian?

faster than a Dodge Viper in a drag race too!

Capability at a glance¹
  • Drivetrain

    All-Wheel Drive
  • 0-60 mph

    3 secs
  • Towing capacity

    Up to 11,000 lbs
  • Wading depth

    3+ ft
  • https://rivian.com/r1t

That is a low towing range for a truck. The charge is also insufficient for pulling far enough for large trailers with the current infrastructure. 

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On 11/21/2022 at 10:35 AM, Jay McKinsey said:

The battery doesn't replace 80lbs of fuel it replaces 80lbs a week for the life of the vehicle. You bozos keep forgetting that batteries aren't consumables like fuel and that they can be recycled unlike fuel.

 

I do find it very disturbing that a supposed physicist does not recognize that once those "80 pounds" of fuel is consumed, you gotta replace it with another "80 pounds" of fuel, again, and again, and again...

And does not consider the regeneration potential realized during deceleration.

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