Tesla Shares to Drop 30% in The Next 6 Months Due to Increased Competition

Tesla's electric car sales will suffer due to increased competition from other luxury automakers, according to Goldman Sachs. The analyst David Tamberrino gave a $210 six-months price target for Tesla shares, representing 30 percent downside to Friday's closing price, noting the significant number of electric vehicle launches from large automakers,  including Audi, BMW, Jaguar and Porsche,  expected over the next several years.

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Yes, Goldman Sachs. You may recall that back in February, Goldman Sachs announced it was once again going negative on Tesla and cutting its rating to sell. In April, with worries rising that the company would fail to achieve its self-imposed goal of producing 5,000 Model 3 electric sedans by the end of June, Goldman publicly reiterated its sell rating. Tesla did, in the end, succeed in hitting this target.

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 Valuing a stock is not that easy. Company might not do very well as a business but it doesn't mean its stock will lead that way. Especially when talking about Tesla. 

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Goldman's reason for downgrading Tesla is weak and stale. Investors shouldn't be concerned. The competition cannot match Tesla advantages in battery technology, supercharger network and loyal customer base.

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(edited)

Goldman Sachs was a key player in collapsing the financial system back in 2008.  Goldman was a developer of the idea of "securitized mortgage loans," and the way that was developed was to have the "aggregator" of loans assign them to a "Depositor," who would in turn "deposit" the loans into a so-called "Trust," in turn which was sat on by a "Trustee of the Trust."  Then the Trust would have a "master servicer" and even various sub-servicers who would go collect the mortgage payments from the borrowers and turn them over to that Trustee, would would then write checks to the Certificate-holders who had purchased Certificates or shares of the Trust  (which in turn was typically sliced up into "tranches" each with their own credit rating and ranking in the order they would be paid, so the lowest-ranking certificate tranche shares would be last, and would experience the highest risk of loss if the borrowers started defaulting). 

In actuality, what happened was classic Goldman:  they had salesmen go around to naive pension fund administrators, most notoriously in small towns in Norway where the municipal employees and teachers had pension funds, and con them into writing a check to Goldman for millions, with the promise of say 3% returns in an environment where returns were at 1% at best.  That money never got deposited into some Trust Fund account from which Certificates were issued:  no, all that cash was deposited directly into the salesman's employer's general bank account.  Now, some funds were transferred to a wholesale accommodation account at say Citibank, and the retail brokers were instructed to go rustle up customers.  the brokers would then close loans with new homebuyers at 6%, and paying themselves a nice commission (and putting their names on the Notes as the so-called "lenders," which they were not).  

Now watch the funds flow: for every million from the Norwegian pension fund, a sum of 30,000 is needed to service that loan.  But for every 6% loan of $500,000, you yield the same $30K.  So:  what happened to the OTHER $500,000 from the Norwegians?  Guess what: that cash which was deposited into the Goldman account - Goldman simply keeps for themselves, in effect a looting of the Norwegian pensioners.  And that is why Goldman could pay out $18 Billion in employee bonuses while the rest of the planet was going broke. 

Now the home borrowers start defaulting - and in theory there are those mortgages to protect the trust owners.  Nope.  Turns out the notes and mortgages never even made it into the trusts, none of them, those are all empty shells. What happened?  The notes were "insured" by various third party insurers, such as AMBAC Indemnity, Radian Insurance Group, and American International Group  (AIG).  The insurance policies were "without subrogation," so when a claim was made, the insurer got to pay the claim but not receive the Note.  When George Bush bailed out the insurers, AIG received some $118 Billion - and had paid it all out in 24 hours.  Now, that is impressive.

So you have these Notes lying around, paid by the third-party insurer, but nobody has stamped it "Obligation Satisfied."  So guess what: the Wall Street crowd found that far too tempting.  So they pick up the Notes, stamp them "transfer "in blank"", and go sue the homeowner in foreclosure on a theory of "holder of the Note." Wall Street bankers paid noting, but get to scoop up the house, kick out the occupants, and go sell it for whatever they can, and then put the cash into the managers' bonus pool.  And that stunt has now been multiplied by some 22 million homes in America.  Wall Street are crooks, remember that (when you sit on some jury with an outraged homeowner suing them).  Lots of big-yacht money came out of those foreclosures of the hapless homeowners. Goldman: not quite the most crooked company on Wall Street  (Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, US Bank, JPMorgan Chase, CitiBank, and Bank of America are even worse), but Goldman is the inventor of the scheme, a huge profiteer, and totally amoral.  Don't do business with that crowd.

And I now include Wells Fargo, a glaring omission in the original post. 

Edited by Jan van Eck
Include Wells Fargo.
  • Like 1

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(edited)

2 hours ago, Jan van Eck said:

Wall Street are crooks, remember that (when you sit on some jury with an outraged homeowner suing them).  Lots of big-yacht money came out of those foreclosures of the hapless homeowners. Goldman: not quite the most crooked company on Wall Street  (Deutsche Bank, Credit Suisse, US Bank, JPMorgan Chase, CitiBank, and Bank of America are even worse), but Goldman is the inventor of the scheme, a huge profiteer, and totally amoral.  Don't do business with that crowd.

I know the list of crooked banks is too long to include in your comment, but you just HAVE to include Wells Fargo, don't you?  

Their logo of a stagecoach is fantastic!  The American stage coach, albeit one of the main ways money was transferred back in the Wild Wild West, was also the lucrative target where a great many outlaws made their names.  So I envision Wells Fargo clients as the passengers being robbed by bandits that can be traced right back to Wells Fargo.  Does anyone with an account (or many more accounts that they are not aware of) at Wells Fargo watch any news on TV?  Or are they all watching Netflix, as Epic likes to point out, having completely given up on the the library and MSM?  It seems that not one month goes by where there is not at least one new multi-hundred-million-dollar fine being paid by Wells Fargo for their "simple mistakes made by low level employees".  I mean, how many clues do people need before they walk down the street and choose any other bank?  

Oh, and by the way, aren't Wells Fargo also one of if not the biggest current mortgage lenders in the world?

Edited by Dan Warnick

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20 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

I know the list of crooked banks is too long to include in your comment, but you just HAVE to include Wells Fargo, don't you?  

Their logo of a stagecoach is fantastic!  The American stage coach, albeit one of the main ways money was transferred back in the Wild Wild West, was also the lucrative target where a great many outlaws made their names.  So I envision Wells Fargo clients as the passengers being robbed by bandits that can be traced right back to Wells Fargo.  Does anyone with an account (or many more accounts that they are not aware of) at Wells Fargo watch any news on TV?  Or are they all watching Netflix, as Epic likes to point out, having completely given up on the the library and MSM?  It seems that not one month goes by where there is not at least one new multi-hundred-million-dollar fine being paid by Wells Fargo for their "simple mistakes made by low level employees".  I mean, how many clues do people need before they walk down the street and choose any other bank?  

Oh, and by the way, aren't Wells Fargo also one of if not the biggest current mortgage lenders in the world?

Wells Fargo is now included.  And no, Wells Fargo is not a mortgage lender, although their name shows up on the loan documents.  In reality, the money is advanced via a third party Certificates investor conduited via a wholesale line of credit, and Wells Fargo is the "servicer."  Wells Fargo is (along with all the rest) notorious for simply forging paper when they don't have the documents to sue the homeowner.  They went to a firm called Lender Processing Services, which in turn set up another outfit called DOCX, which was a forging outfit. It turns out one of the big banks, I cannot remember who, possibly Deutsche, sued Lynn Symoniak, who is a (woman) attorney and a real bulldog.  Big mistake; she went to town and uncovered the signature mill inside LPS/DOCX.  Uncovered was one "Linda Green," who had 27 different signature variations due to her name being signed by 27 different people, including men.  One guy worked as a forklift guy in a warehouse at ten bucks an hour before DOCX recruited him to be a Linda Green signer.  And his signature was then notarized by a scad of notarial signers who hung onto some notary stamp and forged notary signatures all over the place. Lynn Symoniak filed a whistleblower lawsuit and pocketed $117 million.  Expensive forgery, I would surmise.

Check it out:     https://youtu.be/5DAyzNW5-sc 

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4 hours ago, Jan van Eck said:

Wells Fargo is now included.  And no, Wells Fargo is not a mortgage lender, although their name shows up on the loan documents.  In reality, the money is advanced via a third party Certificates investor conduited via a wholesale line of credit, and Wells Fargo is the "servicer."  Wells Fargo is (along with all the rest) notorious for simply forging paper when they don't have the documents to sue the homeowner.  They went to a firm called Lender Processing Services, which in turn set up another outfit called DOCX, which was a forging outfit. It turns out one of the big banks, I cannot remember who, possibly Deutsche, sued Lynn Symoniak, who is a (woman) attorney and a real bulldog.  Big mistake; she went to town and uncovered the signature mill inside LPS/DOCX.  Uncovered was one "Linda Green," who had 27 different signature variations due to her name being signed by 27 different people, including men.  One guy worked as a forklift guy in a warehouse at ten bucks an hour before DOCX recruited him to be a Linda Green signer.  And his signature was then notarized by a scad of notarial signers who hung onto some notary stamp and forged notary signatures all over the place. Lynn Symoniak filed a whistleblower lawsuit and pocketed $117 million.  Expensive forgery, I would surmise.

Check it out:     https://youtu.be/5DAyzNW5-sc 

By the time I got half way through that video, I had to force my jaw back up to close my mouth!  That's Enron level!  We need to have laws that protect us from punishment in the event we need to tar and feather some evil people.  Man, our government needs to be cleaned out and accountability restored.  I saw the Glass-Steagall Act mentioned in the comments, saying it needs to be brought back to protect against things like that.  Is that an accurate Act with reference for this type of crime?

Check out this list from Violation Tracker.  Wells Fargo has paid over 5 1/5 BILLION $$ in fines since the year 2000.  Has anyone gone to jail?  I can't find anything that says anyone from Wells Fargo has gone to jail.  Click here for a good summary of that.  I'll also note, for any Buffet fans, Berkshire Hathaway, Inc is the biggest major shareholder in Wells Fargo.  Click here.

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(edited)

BlackRock v USBANK Complaint -bigmoneyrustlers.pdf

15447269-Yellowstone-Mountian-Club-Interim-Order.pdf

I had a very long write-up on these two pdf attachments describing the history, and poof! it disappeared when I tried to post it.  I am getting paranoid, that is twice now. Bank fraudsters must be lurking inside my machine.......

Edited by Jan van Eck
added my comment on disappearing posts

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4 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

By the time I got half way through that video, I had to force my jaw back up to close my mouth!  That's Enron level!  We need to have laws that protect us from punishment in the event we need to tar and feather some evil people.  Man, our government needs to be cleaned out and accountability restored.  I saw the Glass-Steagall Act mentioned in the comments, saying it needs to be brought back to protect against things like that.  Is that an accurate Act with reference for this type of crime?

Check out this list from Violation Tracker.  Wells Fargo has paid over 5 1/5 BILLION $$ in fines since the year 2000.  Has anyone gone to jail?  I can't find anything that says anyone from Wells Fargo has gone to jail.  Click here for a good summary of that.  I'll also note, for any Buffet fans, Berkshire Hathaway, Inc is the biggest major shareholder in Wells Fargo.  Click here.

Nobody has gone to jail.  Nobody has even been arrested.  Nobody has personally been fined.  It is all business as usual, on Wall Street, fraud is the Order of the Day.  Obama did nothing, he was terrified the system would collapse. 

The State govts did nothing, as Wall Street went to the Governors and key legislators, declaring that if they were blocked from doing fraudulent foreclosures, the Street would refuse to buy deficit funding bonds.  As these States are  all running massively in the red, and the Street is the only Buyer of their junk, the Governors and Legislatures all caved.  So the Street continues to steal homes. Welcome to America.

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