10 Incredible Facts about U.S. LNG

The real push for US LNG will come from Europe, as Russian adventurism and military probes scare the Europeans.  In the past, the thinking was that buying oil and gas from Russia would bring Russia into the fold, that Russia would forget about being an imperial power intent i=on invading its neighbors and settle down, play nice, and enjoy the fruits of peaceful trade.  

Those ides went out the window when Russia invaded Georgia, invaded South Ossetia, invaded the Crimea, and then invaded the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine.  That is seriously scary.  There is no reason to think that Putin is calling it a day with his invasions.  I predict his next moves will be against the Baltic States, probably either Estonia or Lithuania first, then Latvia.  Due to the position of the Kaliningrad Oblast and its bumping up against Belarus, with only a 38-mile gap for NATO troop movements, and in that gap only one rail line with a track gauge different from Europe and only one road capable of moving heavy materiel  (and no bridges capable of supporting an Abrams heavy tank),  Lithuania is especially vulnerable to a rapid take-over.  Would Russia chance it?  Probably. 

the only realistic way to put pressure on Russia is to refuse to buy their gas.  OK, so if Europe wants to go that route (and the Poles certainly do), then it implies large purchase of LNG from abroad.  The sources for that are Qatar and the USA.  Qatar remains problematic due to the upcoming shooting war between the Shias and the Sunnis, so that leaves the USA as the default supplier.  I predict large amounts of US gas will be sold into Europe. 

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3 hours ago, Jan van Eck said:

The real push for US LNG will come from Europe, as Russian adventurism and military probes scare the Europeans.  In the past, the thinking was that buying oil and gas from Russia would bring Russia into the fold, that Russia would forget about being an imperial power intent i=on invading its neighbors and settle down, play nice, and enjoy the fruits of peaceful trade.  

Those ides went out the window when Russia invaded Georgia, invaded South Ossetia, invaded the Crimea, and then invaded the Donetsk and Luhansk regions of Ukraine.  That is seriously scary.  There is no reason to think that Putin is calling it a day with his invasions.  I predict his next moves will be against the Baltic States, probably either Estonia or Lithuania first, then Latvia.  Due to the position of the Kaliningrad Oblast and its bumping up against Belarus, with only a 38-mile gap for NATO troop movements, and in that gap only one rail line with a track gauge different from Europe and only one road capable of moving heavy materiel  (and no bridges capable of supporting an Abrams heavy tank),  Lithuania is especially vulnerable to a rapid take-over.  Would Russia chance it?  Probably. 

the only realistic way to put pressure on Russia is to refuse to buy their gas.  OK, so if Europe wants to go that route (and the Poles certainly do), then it implies large purchase of LNG from abroad.  The sources for that are Qatar and the USA.  Qatar remains problematic due to the upcoming shooting war between the Shias and the Sunnis, so that leaves the USA as the default supplier.  I predict large amounts of US gas will be sold into Europe. 

Maintaining the progression of Nuclear new build from the 1990's would have helped contain Russia gas expansion.

The UK should have continued building an additional PWR every 2-3 years after Sizewell B (1995). Instead War criminal Blair went full bore dash for gas which depleted the UK's reserves rapidly and now left us highly reliant on imported gas. Similar story in other European nations.

Another aspect of nuclear is the fuel is easy to store. a years supply of nuclear fuel for a large PWR is about the size of a double decker bus.

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39 minutes ago, NickW said:

Maintaining the progression of Nuclear new build from the 1990's would have helped contain Russia gas expansion.

The UK should have continued building an additional PWR every 2-3 years after Sizewell B (1995). Instead War criminal Blair went full bore dash for gas which depleted the UK's reserves rapidly and now left us highly reliant on imported gas. Similar story in other European nations.

Another aspect of nuclear is the fuel is easy to store. a years supply of nuclear fuel for a large PWR is about the size of a double decker bus.

All true.  Further, the UK could have assured its electrical energy independence, and provided enough for electric-arc furnaces for steel-making for its shipbuilding and electric reduction furnaces for its own aluminum smelting, had it joined with the Canadians and Americans in the development of packaged thorium (molten-salt) reactor technology.  I predict the outputs from those machines would result in very cheap power, down into the fractions of a cent per kwh.  And the reason is the inherent stable design of such a reactor, and the by-passing of the need for multiple redundancy systems as they cannot go to melt-down, would save capital and have a much lower labor cost. 

Ultimately, those machines will be built in volume, with one for each town, all providing for a very stable grid (unlike solar panels).  But you do have to ignore the hysterical greenies, before they totally wreck things.

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34 minutes ago, Jan van Eck said:

All true.  Further, the UK could have assured its electrical energy independence, and provided enough for electric-arc furnaces for steel-making for its shipbuilding and electric reduction furnaces for its own aluminum smelting, had it joined with the Canadians and Americans in the development of packaged thorium (molten-salt) reactor technology.  I predict the outputs from those machines would result in very cheap power, down into the fractions of a cent per kwh.  And the reason is the inherent stable design of such a reactor, and the by-passing of the need for multiple redundancy systems as they cannot go to melt-down, would save capital and have a much lower labor cost. 

Ultimately, those machines will be built in volume, with one for each town, all providing for a very stable grid (unlike solar panels).  But you do have to ignore the hysterical greenies, before they totally wreck things.

The UK has a long history of being involved in the forefront of industrial (and defence) developments only to be sold down the river by our own politicians or stitched up by our allies.

Defence - The best Interceptor in the 1960's by far was the English Electric Lightning. What did everyone buy - the Lockhead Widowmaker (otherwise known as the starfighter). TSR 2 scrapped when Oz pulled out. What did they get instead - the F111 at 4x the price a decade later!

I often say to my friends - there is nothing stopping a nation heading towards 3rd World status. Argentina had a similar GDP / head as the USA in the 1940's. This is stark warning I have had for Aussies (I hold an Oz Passport) as our economy heads towards being one that digs stuff out the ground for export. An Anglo-ish version of Tanzania.

 

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8 minutes ago, NickW said:

 

I often say to my friends - there is nothing stopping a nation heading towards 3rd World status. Argentina had a similar GDP / head as the USA in the 1940's. This is stark warning I have had for Aussies (I hold an Oz Passport) as our economy heads towards being one that digs stuff out the ground for export. An Anglo-ish version of Tanzania.

 

Australia would be better off developing its trade relations with England and New Zealand instead of China.  As similar peoples, less chances of getting screwed over in the long term. 

Becoming an extraction base for China is not good planning.  Basically, they are setting themselves up to being an outlier colony of the Empire.  Eventually, Darth Vader arrives and leaves a garrison to run the place. Remember the fate of Cloud City.

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