Why isn't there any chatter about Trump climate change

Donald Trump buried a climate change report he doesn't believe.  https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/26/politics/donald-trump-climate-change/index.html  

I haven't read the entire report of 1200 pages but I find it odd that there seems to be silence about the report other than the few groups who yelped on Black Friday. 

Its also noteworthy to see how this article is written. There is only one written instance in it that combines "President Donald Trump" in this format. Almost a specific and deliberate action of reducing and belittling him as our current President. 

By no means do I give President Trump or for that matter President Donald Trump a pass on all that he does while in office. The stature of the office should garner a sense of respect for whomever sits there. 

But from my perspective it seems as though I hear crickets about the the climate change thingy. Since this is such a world wide epidemic how is it that those who drill/extract/refine/etc oil and all of its byproducts aren't as scared as Chicken Little is that our planet will burn up?

Any thoughts and insight and whatever is welcomed.

 

 

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, Brent Hamrick said:

But from my perspective it seems as though I hear crickets about the the climate change thingy. Since this is such a world wide epidemic how is it that those who drill/extract/refine/etc oil and all of its byproducts aren't as scared as Chicken Little is that our planet will burn up?

Any thoughts and insight and whatever is welcomed.

Ooh, oooh, I can play this game!  Sure you want to get me started?

 

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And then there is this, from Science Magazine:

Why 536 was ‘the worst year to be alive’

Ask medieval historian Michael McCormick what year was the worst to be alive, and he's got an answer: "536." Not 1349, when the Black Death wiped out half of Europe. Not 1918, when the flu killed 50 million to 100 million people, mostly young adults. But 536. In Europe, "It was the beginning of one of the worst periods to be alive, if not the worst year," says McCormick, a historian and archaeologist who chairs the Harvard University Initiative for the Science of the Human Past.

A mysterious fog plunged Europe, the Middle East, and parts of Asia into darkness, day and night—for 18 months. "For the sun gave forth its light without brightness, like the moon, during the whole year," wrote Byzantine historian Procopius. Temperatures in the summer of 536 fell 1.5°C to 2.5°C, initiating the coldest decade in the past 2300 years. Snow fell that summer in China; crops failed; people starved. The Irish chronicles record "a failure of bread from the years 536–539." Then, in 541, bubonic plague struck the Roman port of Pelusium, in Egypt. What came to be called the Plague of Justinian spread rapidly, wiping out one-third to one-half of the population of the eastern Roman Empire and hastening its collapse, McCormick says.

Historians have long known that the middle of the sixth century was a dark hour in what used to be called the Dark Ages, but the source of the mysterious clouds has long been a puzzle. Now, an ultraprecise analysis of ice from a Swiss glacier by a team led by McCormick and glaciologist Paul Mayewski at the Climate Change Institute of The University of Maine (UM) in Orono has fingered a culprit. At a workshop at Harvard this week, the team reported that a cataclysmic volcanic eruption in Iceland spewed ash across the Northern Hemisphere early in 536. Two other massive eruptions followed, in 540 and 547. The repeated blows, followed by plague, plunged Europe into economic stagnation that lasted until 640, when another signal in the ice—a spike in airborne lead—marks a resurgence of silver mining, as the team reports in Antiquity this week.

To Kyle Harper, provost and a medieval and Roman historian at The University of Oklahoma in Norman, the detailed log of natural disasters and human pollution frozen into the ice "give us a new kind of record for understanding the concatenation of human and natural causes that led to the fall of the Roman Empire—and the earliest stirrings of this new medieval economy." ...

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9 hours ago, Brent Hamrick said:

Donald Trump buried a climate change report he doesn't believe.  https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/26/politics/donald-trump-climate-change/index.html  

I haven't read the entire report of 1200 pages but I find it odd that there seems to be silence about the report other than the few groups who yelped on Black Friday. 

Its also noteworthy to see how this article is written. There is only one written instance in it that combines "President Donald Trump" in this format. Almost a specific and deliberate action of reducing and belittling him as our current President. 

By no means do I give President Trump or for that matter President Donald Trump a pass on all that he does while in office. The stature of the office should garner a sense of respect for whomever sits there. 

But from my perspective it seems as though I hear crickets about the the climate change thingy. Since this is such a world wide epidemic how is it that those who drill/extract/refine/etc oil and all of its byproducts aren't as scared as Chicken Little is that our planet will burn up?

Any thoughts and insight and whatever is welcomed.

 

Where is the response from those who drill/extract/refine/etc oil yada yada yada?

I want to know: where is the rub it in your face gleeful parade of I told you so's?  There is no way the media and the climate pro crowd would let this be "buried on Black Friday".  On this site in particularly, I have been waiting for someone to bring it on as the penultimate TRUTH about everything they tell us we should, must, be doing to avert the destruction of our planet and the death of our grandchildren.  I put the following interview forth as a possible reason:

Dr. Patrick Michaels, director of the Center for the Study of Science at the Cato Institute, provides insight into the debate over climate change and the political games played to create policy.

 

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11 hours ago, Dan Warnick said:

Where is the response from those who drill/extract/refine/etc oil yada yada yada?

I want to know: where is the rub it in your face gleeful parade of I told you so's?  There is no way the media and the climate pro crowd would let this be "buried on Black Friday".  On this site in particularly, I have been waiting for someone to bring it on as the penultimate TRUTH about everything they tell us we should, must, be doing to avert the destruction of our planet and the death of our grandchildren.  I put the following interview forth as a possible reason:

Dr. Patrick Michaels, director of the Center for the Study of Science at the Cato Institute, provides insight into the debate over climate change and the political games played to create policy.

 

I am of the mindset that would state the world will fail when its supposed to fail. Our world is a revolving door to birth through death. Daily this happens through the planned open door policy that we all opp'ed into. 

Nature has cycles that can not be halted by humans. Nor can we extract ourselves from oil, the price point to bring products to market by the means of oil is too low for humanity to change. Cost base analysis suggests/tells us that until we find a better power house that brings as much energy output as oil can bring, humans will not stop drilling. 

Unless humans all decide with complete unison that Nikolai Tesla's coil be used to generate electricity and provided to the world oil will reign supreme and stay here forever. 

 

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(edited)

I am betting on all the smart people working on energy storage at different scales.

One of my Scottish ancestors played a minor role in the Industrial Revolution. One of my grandfathers worked for Royal Dutch Shell in the great Central Valley of California in the early to mid 20th century. All good stuff for its time. I am ready to move to a less fossil fuel intensive world. Cleaner air and water are bonuses for me. Believe or not believe; it does not matter if the markets evolve to favor renewables plus storage.   

Edited by Janet Alderton
grammar changes

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