About That Automation Stealing Jobs...

I get a good chuckle out of this every time I see it.  There's an army of idiots who possess 4-year liberal arts degrees, a mountain of debt, and minimum wage jobs.  Meanwhile, companies can't find enough people with real knowledge and skills. 

The real irony of graduates complaining about student loan debt and job prospects is that economic growth is proportional to the number of people with real skills.  There's an effectively unlimited number of business opportunities to pursue, if only we had people qualified to pursue them.  The only exception to that rule is when government goes on a witch hunt against industry.  E.g. the regulation, high taxes, and outsourcing the US practiced for the last couple decades.  Remove that from the equation, and things almost always look good. 

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(edited)

7 hours ago, mthebold said:

I get a good chuckle out of this every time I see it.  There's an army of idiots who possess 4-year liberal arts degrees, a mountain of debt, and minimum wage jobs.  Meanwhile, companies can't find enough people with real knowledge and skills. 

The real irony of graduates complaining about student loan debt and job prospects is that economic growth is proportional to the number of people with real skills.  There's an effectively unlimited number of business opportunities to pursue, if only we had people qualified to pursue them.  The only exception to that rule is when government goes on a witch hunt against industry.  E.g. the regulation, high taxes, and outsourcing the US practiced for the last couple decades.  Remove that from the equation, and things almost always look good. 

None of this would happen if our federal and state governments would funnel educational support to specific fields that are really needed to make our country work. Blue collar, nursing, allied medical, home construction, plumbing, electrical, home renovating, etc. Two year colleges are best for getting these occupations started but it should start in high school and one year is enough for fundamental skills. Educators are more interested in teaching or influence in the areas they wish than helping students get jobs. Basic carpentry and other skills should start as soon as possible. 

Germany has always had a more class based approach. They have the practical schools and the academic schools completely separated, based on testing. (Old information, correct me if I am wrong). I think people should be able to decide what they want to study, but only if they are paying the bills. Then again there is plenty of free education for that. I am a firm believer in distance education. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distance_education

Free Education https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nkAnzn9R7NH0LqihEeeq4be4ckBgk70YkGKbHsrnbTU/edit

Edited by ronwagn
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14 hours ago, ronwagn said:

None of this would happen if our federal and state governments would funnel educational support to specific fields that are really needed to make our country work. Blue collar, nursing, allied medical, home construction, plumbing, electrical, home renovating, etc. Two year colleges are best for getting these occupations started but it should start in high school and one year is enough for fundamental skills. Educators are more interested in teaching or influence in the areas they wish than helping students get jobs. Basic carpentry and other skills should start as soon as possible.  

Germany has always had a more class based approach. They have the practical schools and the academic schools completely separated, based on testing. (Old information, correct me if I am wrong). I think people should be able to decide what they want to study, but only if they are paying the bills. Then again there is plenty of free education for that. I am a firm believer in distance education. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Distance_education

Free Education https://docs.google.com/document/d/1nkAnzn9R7NH0LqihEeeq4be4ckBgk70YkGKbHsrnbTU/edit

Specifically, high schools used to teach more shop classes.  More recently, high schools have begun partnering with local tech schools to provide these experiences.  The end result is that one can finish at least a year of tech school before graduating.  Alternatively, one can get a GED and go straight to tech school.  Given how worthless US schools are (and that's at best; most are actually counterproductive), the GED route is probably the best. 

That said, even the university level is dominated by waste.  Diversity programs, luxury dormitories, vast recreational complexes, armies of administrators, entire colleges full of worthless degrees... it's a train wreck.  At this point, it's so wasteful we should strip all public funding and let the universities fend for themselves.  Contrary to popular belief, stripping funding would be better for students as well: with a financial incentive to produce competent graduates, universities would be forced to stop lying to naive families.

Germany has a more sensible system.  There are several points at which students are sorted by ability.  The lazy and incapable are shunted towards more practical skills, leaving the capable and industrious to go to university.  This allows them to maintain educational standards, which allows them to maintain their economy. 

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My schooling included some carpentry and other skills from elementary until High School where I was shunted into the academic route but we had high schools where manual arts were emphasized. I think that behavioral problems and others were shunted there but I don't know the criteria used. 

I think that in Germany it is no disgrace to be in the practical schools but maybe to some. I think that it is just looked upon as a different way to go for those so inclined. I would like to know more. Germany is known for skilled craftsmen and I am sure is very proud of that. 

I totally agree with your take on our collegiate mess. 

Here is my Educational Problems topic https://docs.google.com/document/d/1PjW6KJmKDEqqrTVZyGwWK36YTvr46Axo9WDkY90WtU4/edit

 

Edited by ronwagn
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8 hours ago, ronwagn said:

Here is my Educational Problems

George Bush much?  LOL!

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