North Sea Rocks Could Store Months Of Renewable Energy

Rocks at the bottom of the North Sea may provide the perfect storage location for renewable energy, according to a new study. Excess power could be stored in the form of compressed air inside porous formations on the seabed, providing a reservoir that can provide energy on demand. This pressurised air can be released to drive a turbine, generating a large amount of electricity.

This would allow green energy to be stored in summer and released in winter, when demand is highest.

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5 hours ago, Brian W said:

Rocks at the bottom of the North Sea may provide the perfect storage location for renewable energy, according to a new study. Excess power could be stored in the form of compressed air inside porous formations on the seabed, providing a reservoir that can provide energy on demand. This pressurised air can be released to drive a turbine, generating a large amount of electricity.

This would allow green energy to be stored in summer and released in winter, when demand is highest.

It's not just batteries when storing energy.

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6 hours ago, Brian W said:

Rocks at the bottom of the North Sea may provide the perfect storage location for renewable energy, according to a new study. Excess power could be stored in the form of compressed air inside porous formations on the seabed, providing a reservoir that can provide energy on demand. This pressurised air can be released to drive a turbine, generating a large amount of electricity.

This would allow green energy to be stored in summer and released in winter, when demand is highest.

I remember the last time someone came up with a green idea to how to reuse North Sea depleted fields this time it was for carbon capture. The government talked and talked about it and in the end BP, I think it was, gave them an ultimatum make a decision or we decommission as it costs us to keep it open. The government failed to make a decision needless to say as they would not stump up the money to do the project can't see how it will be different with compressed air unless someone other than the government stumps up a lot of money to buy a depleted oil field, run large power cables to the rig miles offshore and be prepared to re furbish and re equip the rig to inject air into the well and generate electricity. I should add from experience the rigs that are decommissioned are in a mess mechanically so the combined upfront costs will deter all but large companies.

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(edited)

8 minutes ago, jaycee said:

I remember the last time someone came up with a green idea to how to reuse North Sea depleted fields this time it was for carbon capture. The government talked and talked about it and in the end BP, I think it was, gave them an ultimatum make a decision or we decommission as it costs us to keep it open. The government failed to make a decision needless to say as they would not stump up the money to do the project can't see how it will be different with compressed air unless someone other than the government stumps up a lot of money to buy a depleted oil field, run large power cables to the rig miles offshore and be prepared to re furbish and re equip the rig to inject air into the well and generate electricity. I should add from experience the rigs that are decommissioned are in a mess mechanically so the combined upfront costs will deter all but large companies.

Equinor are doing carbon capture and re-injection at the troll field. I believe they found a to do it so it enhances oil recovery. financially, it is viable because of the reductions in CO2 tax. 

https://www.maritime-executive.com/article/equinor-wins-permit-for-subsea-carbon-storage-project 

Edited by Rasmus Jorgensen

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1 minute ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

Equinor are doing carbon capture and re-injection at the troll field. I believe they found a to do it so it enhances oil recovery. financially, it is viable because of the reductions in NOx tax. 

Reinjection is a normal way to increase the life of some fields by increasing the downhole pressure. If there is oil there an oil company will do it if the CAPEX can be justified. This is different to what the original post as it was talking about using exhausted fields as storage just like UK's plan to inject CO2 which failed due to lack of government backing.

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