Malaysia Oil & Gas Updates

Good news for the longer term downstream oil & gas sector for Peninsular Malaysia and for Saudi Arabia.

Here.

For Malaysian lurkers, note my distinct lack of mentioning East Malaysia (Sarawak and Sabah) oil & gas sector in this Pengerang project in Peninsular Malaysia.

All of the oil for the Pengerang project is being imported into Malaysia, mostly from Saudi Arabia and Iraq.  Local Malaysian oil & gas upstream production is not part of this Pengerang project at all.

I'm waiting for some news about totally different plans that are quietly developing in Sarawak and Sabah for upstream and downstream oil & gas.  I expect to be kicking up a fuss about the developments at some point soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I will likely be a speaker at this oil & gas seminar in Sarawak, Malaysia in April.  At the end of the seminar, a White Paper will likely be given to Petronas senior management and to the Sarawak Chief Minister (the Chief Minister is similar to a State Governor in the U.S. and similar to the state Sultans in the Muslim majority states in Peninsular Malaysia).

Sarawak to chart future of its O&G industry

"The Sarawak government is taking charge of the development of the state’s Oil and Gas industry and is open to advice from experts and experienced players in the industry.

Yesterday, Chief Minister Datuk Patinggi Abang Johari Tun Openg had two briefings on the subject – charting the future direction of Sarawak’s participation in the oil and gas industry.

In the morning, president of Sarawak Bumiputera Chamber of Commerce (DUBS) Datuk Abang Helmi Ikhwan was tasked with organising the inaugural Sarawak oil and gas seminar and exhibition in April.

The meeting was held at the chief minister’s office in Wisma Bapa Malaysia, Petra Jaya here, to brief the chief minister on the progress of the impending seminar and exhibition.

The aim of the seminar is to get experts’ input and professional views on the much-awaited Sarawak’s venture into the oil and gas industry.

Later, in the afternoon, the chief minister was briefed by Petros board of directors on the development and issues in making Sarawak’s participation in the oil and gas industry a reality. ..."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok... I am confused...   I thought they had already developed their infrastructure and were operational,  which was why you were there...

Yet you are talking above as if they are just getting started...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Illurion said:

Ok... I am confused...   I thought they had already developed their infrastructure and were operational,  which was why you were there...

Yet you are talking above as if they are just getting started...

Its a dispute between:

● Malaysia Federal Government & its National Oil Company Petronas

vs.

● Sarawak State Government & its new Sarawak State Oil Company Petros.

You will be hearing more about this from me before the seminar.  I've been vocal about this dispute for years, both on the now defunct Oilpro site and also on LinkedIn.

I generally tend to side with the state's rights of their own natural resources, especially for oil & gas.

In their election manifesto about a year ago, the federal government has promised to look into State's rights, but so far the federal government and Petronas is NATO (No Action, Talk Only).

The seminar organised by Sarawak is meant to create some actual action and ignore the (so far) totally empty promises made by numerous parties.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've been commenting quite a bit lately over on LinkedIn about Malaysia oil & gas, and the long-running local disputes between the Malaysian federal government and the Oil & Gas producing states.  Touchy local issue.

I'm not commenting so much here on Oil Price about this local Malaysian topic, simply because I have thousands of Malaysian connections on LinkedIn, but not so much here.

Below is an amusing screencap of a pushback against one of my comments this morning on LinkedIn.  

Note that the commentor is not refuting in any way anything that I have commented, or the documents I provided, but clearly wants me to stop.

I try to strike a balance between:

- speaking my mind + providing dox to back up my points, 

and

- pushing others away by being too strident.

I'm not going to stop commenting just because someone wants to keep his fingers firmly in his ears.

And I've pretty much always been political in my postings.

My comments this morning on LinkedIn about Malaysia Oil & Gas:

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6508839017977610240

 

Screenshot_20190306-083247_LinkedIn.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

On 2/22/2019 at 4:30 PM, Tom Kirkman said:

Good news for the longer term downstream oil & gas sector for Peninsular Malaysia and for Saudi Arabia.

Here.

For Malaysian lurkers, note my distinct lack of mentioning East Malaysia (Sarawak and Sabah) oil & gas sector in this Pengerang project in Peninsular Malaysia.

All of the oil for the Pengerang project is being imported into Malaysia, mostly from Saudi Arabia and Iraq.  Local Malaysian oil & gas upstream production is not part of this Pengerang project at all.

I'm waiting for some news about totally different plans that are quietly developing in Sarawak and Sabah for upstream and downstream oil & gas.  I expect to be kicking up a fuss about the developments at some point soon.

Heard rumour last year that Saudi scrapped investment in Pengerang.......... One to four culprits of social cruelty; indifference; injustice; insanity with unfounded death threats to the innocent are likely the trigger ................... Wondering if there would be more like Saudi.............??

On 2/23/2019 at 3:57 PM, Tom Kirkman said:

"The Sarawak government is taking charge of the development of the state’s Oil and Gas industry and is open to advice from experts and experienced players in the industry.

Heard .......... unless Sarawak requests for independence........... much restriction ........ from the federal............

Edited by specinho

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, specinho said:

Heard rumour last year that Saudi scrapped investment in Pengerang.......... One to four culprits of social cruelty; indifference; injustice; insanity with unfounded death threats to the innocent are likely the trigger ................... Wondering if there would be more like Saudi.............??1.

Heard .......... unless Sarawak requests for independence........... much restriction ........ from the federal............

1. Pengerang is proceeding, with Saudi Arabia on board.

2. Sarawak O&G is a very touchy issue with tbe Malaysia federal government. 

Next month I will be one of the moderators facilitating an official State-sponsored discussion panel in Miri, Sarawak regarding Sarawak Oil & Gas rights.

Sarawak Chief Minister (similar to a State Governor in the U.S.) will be there.  This seminar will likely make Petronas nervous.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6509185177900679168

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My article this week on LinkedIn:

The Inaugural Sarawak Oil & Gas Seminar & Exhibition
 

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/inaugural-sarawak-oil-gas-seminar-exhibition-tom-kirkman

The Organizers of Inaugural Sarawak Oil & Gas Seminar & Exhibition have invited me to be the Facilitator for the Opening Seminar.

This State-sponsored event will be held at the Pullman Waterfront Hotel in Miri, Sarawak on 13th and 14th April 2019.

The Sarawak Chief Minister will attending, along with Sarawak government officials and stakeholders, PETRONAS, PETROS, Sarawak Oil & Gas companies, special interest groups and NGOs. There will be free public access to the Gallery and Exhibition Booths.

The discussion panels will highlight both the challenges and opportunities facing the Sarawak Oil & Gas industry.

Those of you who know me as a Moderator know that you can expect to have some lively, exuberant and open discussions about Sarawak Oil & Gas.

  • Dissent is encouraged.
  • Opposing and differing viewpoints are encouraged.

Hope you can participate and voice up your own views. Don't be shy.

My well-worn tag line reminder as a Moderator on the former Oilpro forum, and currently as a Moderator on the Oil Price forum, is applicable here:

"Just my opinion; as always, you are free to disagree."

Below is the schedule, and an overview of the event:

...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Separately, at the end of April, I've also been asked to address the Institute of Engineers, Malaysia for a couple hours, including a Question & Answer session. The topic is The Future of Oil & Gas in Malaysia.  

And I was also asked to address the Oil and Gas Fiesta Pengerang in Johor, Malaysia on 14th & 15th April.  But that is the same time frame as the Sarawak Oil & Gas Seminar & Exhibition, so I had to decline.  Maybe next year.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not much interest in Malaysia O&G on this forum, apparently.

Anyway, here's my update this morning over on LinkedIn.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6511726168671121408

Malaysia has been a net *oil importing* country since around 2014.

Yes, as the world's 3rd largest exporter of LNG, Malaysia is a net *Oil & Gas* exporter.

But Malaysia imports more oil than it exports.

How many Malaysians are aware that Petronas signed a 20 year contract with Cheniere Energy in the USA to purchase LNG cargos?  See my comments below for a link.

Does it strike anyone as odd that the 3rd largest exporter of LNG in the world is contracting cargos of LNG from halfway around the world, under a 20 year contract?

I've heard rumors that some of the LNG trains in Bintulu, Malaysia are excessively expensive to run, and that is cheaper for Malaysia to buy LNG from the USA to re-sell to Asian customers.  How true this is, I can't say for sure.

Anyway, I'll repeat the exact same point that I have commented for years, but which generally just gets ignored ...

● Malaysia has been a net *oil importing* country since around 2014. ●

See my next comments below for a link to an old article that backs up my repeated assertions about Malaysia's "net oil importing country" status since 2014.

==================================

1st comment - link to an old article that supports my assertions which I have repeated over the years, that Malaysia has been a net oil importing country since around 2014.

Please do feel free to ignore this again, as usual...
 

"21 Jan 2015

... the Government has disclosed that Malaysia is a beneficiary of declining crude oil prices because the country is a net importer, and not exporter, of the commodity and petroleum products, if liquefied natural gas (LNG) was not in the equation.

Treasury secretary-general Tan Sri Dr Mohd Irwan Serigar Abdullah said Malaysia had turned into a net importer of crude oil and petroleum products since 2014. ..."

https://www.thestar.com.my/business/business-news/2015/01/21/clearing-the-air-treasury-sec-gen-malaysia-net-importer-of-crude-oil-petroleum-products-since-2014/

==================================

2nd comment - link to an old article about Petronas 20 year contract to purchase LNG from Cheniere Energy in USA, which is literally halfway around the world from Malaysia:

 

December 18, 2018

Cheniere Energy Partners, L.P. announced today that its subsidiary Sabine Pass Liquefaction, LLC has entered into a liquefied natural gas sale and purchase agreement with PETRONAS LNG Ltd., a subsidiary of the Malaysian state-owned oil and gas company, PETRONAS. 

PLL has agreed to purchase approximately 1.1 million tonnes per annum of LNG from Sabine Pass Liquefaction on a free on board basis for a term of 20 years following the date of first commercial delivery for the sixth natural gas liquefaction train at the Sabine Pass liquefaction project. 

The purchase price for LNG is indexed to the monthly Henry Hub price, plus a fee. ...

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181218005430/en/Cheniere-PETRONAS-Sign-20-Year-LNG-Sale-Purchase

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I probably should have made this a blog post here, rather than a thread.  I know Malaysia Oil & Gas isn't exactly high on the radar list of most readers here, although I know there are some influential Malaysian lurkers that read this thread.

This morning, I made another post on LinkedIn.

It has very much to do with Malaysia Oil & Gas and Petronas.  And a spotlight on the fundamental foundations and future of Malaysia's National Oil Company. 

I'll copy what I wrote on LinkedIn a bit lower down, but here is something I did NOT write on LinkedIn.  I got tired of being censored on LinkedIn and repeatedly getting some of my comments summarily "disappeared" when I wrote things that some other people didn't like.  So I tend to avoid sacred cows on LinkedIn these days.

Anyway, this bit below is meant for certain Malaysian lurkers:

I'm expecting an earthquake / shakeup at Petronas in April.

Dr. Mahathir was summarily removed as the Petronas Advisor back in 2016, a deliberate snub and insult to him by the Prime Minister at that time.

That insult was probably a pretty stupid move.  Dr. Mahathir is back again as the current Prime Minister.  Petronas reports directly and only to the Prime Minister.  And revenge is a dish best served cold.

 

With that out of the way, here is my LinkedIn update this morning:

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6512088843091566592

Petronas and Malaysia, please do take note of this article.  It's long, but worth the read.  The Executive Summary is straightforward and succinct.

Restoration of the Malaysia Agreement 1963 is near the top of the list of 4 items. Sarawak and Sabah, looks like this will finally be addressed, after decades of willful impairment.

And I'm also waiting to see what big changes are in store at the Twin Towers in April.  The Calm Before the Storm.

Buckle up ...
================================

"Malaysia’s new government will need to deal with several key issues in the next 12 months to establish itself as a ‘change and reform’ administration, namely the Malay/Bumiputra Agenda, the 1963 Malaysia Agreement (MA63), political Islam, and a clear timetable for transition of power.

Each of these issues is crucial to Malaysia’s political stability in the near term and to laying the foundation for long-term institutional reforms. ..."

 

‘NEW’ MALAYSIA: FOUR KEY CHALLENGES IN THE NEAR TERM

KEY FINDINGS

  • Malaysia’s new government will need to deal with several key issues in the next 12 months to establish itself as a ‘change and reform’ administration, namely the Malay/Bumiputra Agenda, the 1963 Malaysia Agreement (MA63), political Islam, and a clear timetable for transition of power.
  • Each of these issues is crucial to Malaysia’s political stability in the near term and to laying the foundation for long-term institutional reforms.
  • If these reforms are not handled properly, the new Pakatan Harapan (Alliance of Hope) administration under Mahathir may be a one-term government and the country could easily revert to the old regime.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

In May 2018 Malaysia underwent its first regime change in its political history. This saw the return of Mahathir Mohamad as prime minster, 15 years after his first tenure as prime minster from 1981 to 2003. As the country heads towards the first anniversary of the Pakatan Harapan (Alliance of Hope) government, it is imperative that the momentum for political change is not stalled. This Analysis identifies four key areas that the new administration must deal with in the next 12 months: the Malay Agenda/Bumiputra Policy; the 1963 Malaysia Agreement (MA63); political Islam; and a clear timetable for transition of power. These issues are not only crucial to the stability of the PH administration, but also for long-term institutional reforms. The first three issues are not new — they went on unresolved under the previous regime, leading to an increasingly dysfunctional political system and culminating in the change of government. The PH government has an opportunity to change Malaysia’s political trajectory if it takes steps to resolve these issues. The more immediate issue at the highest level of government is the promised transition of power to Anwar Ibrahim. If not handled properly, PH may turn out to be a one-term government and the country could revert to the old regime.

INTRODUCTION

...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

29 minutes ago, Tom Kirkman said:

I'm expecting an earthquake / shakeup at Petronas in April.

Dr. Mahathir was summarily removed as the Petronas Advisor back in 2016, a deliberate snub and insult to him by the Prime Minister at that time.

That insult was probably a pretty stupid move.  Dr. Mahathir is back again as the current Prime Minister.  Petronas reports directly and only to the Prime Minister.  And revenge is a dish best served cold.

P.S.    A bit of background about my comment above.

Attached is my one on one, 4 eyes interview with Dr. Mahathir a few years ago regarding Petronas.  Do not assume he is any less pissed off now as he was then about being removed as Petronas Advisor.

Excerpt from the attached interview:

==================================

Dr. Mahathir bin Mohamad was the 4th Prime Minister of Malaysia. He held the post for 22 years from 1981 to 2003, making him Malaysia's longest-serving Prime Minister.

After stepping down as Prime Minister, Dr. Mahathir took on the role of Petronas Advisor in 2003.

On March 11 2016, the Malaysian government terminated the services of Dr. Mahathir, due to a political dispute between former Prime Minister Mahathir and the current Prime Minister Najib Razak.

The Prime Minister's Office said in a brief statement that the Cabinet had discussed the actions of Dr.Mahathir, and decided that since he was "no longer supporting the current Government, he should no longer hold any position related to the Government."

On 30th March 2016, Dr. Mahathir was kind enough to agree to an interview with Oilpro Moderator Tom Kirkman, to discuss Petronas.
______________________________________________
Question: The Malaysian government recently appointed former Prime Minister Abdullah Badawi to replace you as Petronas Advisor. Could you comment about this?

Dr. Mahathir: He didn’t perform so well as Prime Minister, and he eventually had to resign, and give way to the current Prime Minister, because he has a not-so-good reputation. And in terms of capability also, he feels very little about other issues. Maybe he knows something about religion, even then, not very deeply. 

On matters of administration, although he was in the Administrative Service, but you know today, you need to know a lot about finance, about the economy, about politics, if you want to be the head of government. He lacked much of the things, the knowledge that he needs, that is actually why he was removed, or persuaded to resign. So I don’t think he will perform so well.  ...

Dr Mahathir _ Petronas Interview.pdf

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you're right, Tom.  If I didn't live next door and have a colleague and a former colleague living there, I wouldn't give a hoot either!  :) 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Long LinkedIn post today.  And 5 of my additional comments with links for background expanations.

In which I was a Royal Pain In The *ss in 2016 and successfully halted discussions by Russia to acquire Petronas Oil & Gas assets within Malaysia.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6513906920666038272

 

Meanwhile, Reuters posted this yesterday:

"... Some analysts have also speculated the government could list a small portion of its stake in state energy firm Petronas to generate revenue.

Petronas is the sole manager of Malaysia’s oil and gas reserves. Although some of its subsidiaries are listed on the national stock exchange, Petronas is fully owned by the government. ..."

 

=========================

P.S. I'll just leave this here, a local Malaysian blogger post from 2016, with all sorts of items addressed:

https://steadyaku47.com/home/2016/05/22/petronas-4-sale/

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Over on LinkedIn I managed to work in a historical article about the 'Headhunters of Borneo' in a comment to a local article about Oil & Gas rights.

https://www.linkedin.com/feed/update/urn:li:activity:6518389078663233536?commentUrn=urn%3Ali%3Acomment%3A(activity%3A6518389078663233536%2C6518392783663923200)

 

 

The History of Borneo's Headhunters

Throughout history, communities have warred against one another. Some, including the tribes in Borneo, severed their victim’s head and preserved it as a trophy or for ritualistic purposes. Discover the basis and motives behind the infamous and fearsome headhunters in Borneo.

 

 

1024px-thumbnail-1.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites