Tom Kirkman

Investments worthy in versatile and clean natural gas

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While much of Western mainstream media continue to inexplicably vilify naturas gas energy, other parts of the world can be a bit more pragmatic at looking at the bigger picture.

Shouting down hydrocarbons while demanding exorbitant taxes to fund unreliable wind and solar energy seems to be the Western media objective.

This article is a more balanced, big picture approach to natural gas.

 

Investments worthy in versatile and clean natural gas

The world is in continuous search for alternatives to polluting and carbon-intensive fuels.

Embracing a clean energy future is paramount as carbon-intensive fuels harm the overall environment and our health. 

It is in this context the relevance of natural gas is increasing.

Although a fossil fuel, natural gas has proven to be relatively clean and has many other qualities that make it an efficient and economical energy source.

Burning natural gas for energy results in fewer emissions of nearly all types of air pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO2) than burning coal or petroleum products to produce an equal amount of energy.  ...

 

... Undoubtedly, natural gas has a key role to play in addressing the global concerns on environmental pollution and climate change. Because, it is versatile, flexible, economic and clean.

 

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(edited)

If solar and wind can provide a lower cost option than natural gas over the life of the plant then they will take over. I think that the numbers do not work out when you consider the need for maintenance and storage of needed energy or backup from fossil fuels. 

Edited by ronwagn
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On 2/25/2020 at 2:50 PM, ronwagn said:

If solar and wind can take provide a lower cost option than natural gas over the life of the plant then they will take over. I think that the numbers do not work out when you consider the need for maintenance and storage of needed energy or backup from fossil fuels. 

At present.

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On 2/27/2020 at 11:31 PM, Meredith Poor said:
On 2/25/2020 at 2:50 PM, ronwagn said:

If solar and wind can take provide a lower cost option than natural gas over the life of the plant then they will take over. I think that the numbers do not work out when you consider the need for maintenance and storage of needed energy or backup from fossil fuels. 

At present.

That is not entirely true that storage isn't ready for prime time. In many situations in particular locations it is even nearing competition with $2 NG, which is not really sustainable but as a byproduct of oil production. So long as that remains, nothing much is actually competitive with NG and little works against LNG.. Only the strongest wind corridors and hot desert are competitive. In those locations, using limited storage due to reliability of sunlight and wind, the cost of the fuel and its shipping will always be higher than local production. Great if you are in Tucson, Albuquerque, Las Vegas Oklahoma City, Kansas and Arkansas. Good enough if you are in a neighboring state.  

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(edited)

On 2/23/2020 at 3:38 PM, Tom Kirkman said:

Burning natural gas for energy results in fewer emissions of nearly all types of air pollutants and carbon dioxide (CO2) than burning coal or petroleum products to produce an equal amount of energy.  ..

 True, but you are still taking carbon underground and releasing it in the atmosphere.

I think fossil fuels will be replaced by carbon-neutral fuels in the future. Those fuels will be produced using renewable energy, removing CO2 from the air and turning it into zero-net-carbon gasoline and jet fuel.

Quote

 

Recent breakthroughs in separations and catalysis, along with long-trend reductions in solar and wind electricity costs, have significantly increased the potential for cost-competitive renewable fuels from direct air capture (DAC) of CO2. This is an important development because there is little time available to reduce CO2 emissions sufficiently to avoid the worst effects of climate change. Transportation fuels contribute a significant portion of current CO2 emissions, accounting for 23% of global greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and up to 40% of GHGs in developed economies, offering significant opportunities for emissions reduction from the decarbonization of such fuels.

Electrification of the global vehicle fleet, which now totals over 1 billion cars and trucks, or conversion of vehicles to use novel fuels like hydrogen, cannot proceed quickly enough to address the climate crisis. Replacing fossil-fuel gasoline, diesel, and jet fuels would be able to proceed at a much faster pace, because it does not require the replacement or retrofit of the existing vehicle fleet. In order for this fuel replacement to occur, however, renewable fuels must offer the same or better performance than fossil fuels at the same or lower price.

—Rob McGinnis, CEO  of Prometheus

 

 

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/01/20200130-prmetheus.html

 

 

Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH’s Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

 

Edited by Guillaume Albasini
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On 2/27/2020 at 10:31 PM, Meredith Poor said:

At present.

Yea, at present. So let's wait a while before we start mass installation. 

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On 3/4/2020 at 3:00 AM, Guillaume Albasini said:

 True, but you are still taking carbon underground and releasing it in the atmosphere.

I think fossil fuels will be replaced by carbon-neutral fuels in the future. Those fuels will be produced using renewable energy, removing CO2 from the air and turning it into zero-net-carbon gasoline and jet fuel.

 

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/01/20200130-prmetheus.html

 

 

Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH’s Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

 

America has done the same experiment with solar at White Sands, New Mexico. Is it scalable? Probably not even close unless oil and natural gas were to go sky high. 

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4 minutes ago, ronwagn said:

America has done the same experiment with solar at White Sands, New Mexico. Is it scalable? Probably not even close unless oil and natural gas were to go sky high. 

No, and that design is moronic for a variety of reasons. I personally don't care, as my ideas I'll work on in college will be more fruitful if THIS is the competitor HAHA. 

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On 3/4/2020 at 4:00 AM, Guillaume Albasini said:

 True, but you are still taking carbon underground and releasing it in the atmosphere.

I think fossil fuels will be replaced by carbon-neutral fuels in the future. Those fuels will be produced using renewable energy, removing CO2 from the air and turning it into zero-net-carbon gasoline and jet fuel.

 

https://www.greencarcongress.com/2020/01/20200130-prmetheus.html

 

 

Researchers from ETH Zurich have developed a novel technology that produces liquid hydrocarbon fuels exclusively from sunlight and air. For the first time worldwide they demonstrate the entire thermochemical process chain under real field conditions. The new solar mini-refinery is located on the roof of ETH’s Machine Laboratory building in Zurich.

 

These are two separate processes, the economics of the ETH process are questionable. The Prometheus aqueous electrochemical process would easily do better as it does not require the sun capture to happen on its own capital, but only to apply "waste" electricity from solar or wind. There is a second electrogas production technique in gas phase using the electrode potential directly on a catalyst to produce either methane and methanol or ethane and ethanol. I call that electrogas. I don't know how well the electrogas process works with intermittent power though. In any case, the main competitive driver is to have no capital cost in the harvesting of solar or wind power input and just use the excess unmarketable power during peak operating times. I.e. 0 capital and operating costs for the energy input. 

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