Tom Kirkman

'No - Deal Brexit' vs 'Operation Fear' Globalist Pushback ... Impact to World Economies and Oil

Recommended Posts

(edited)

lol where do you find these memes?!

and yes, not too much of a generalisation on brexit voters at all...

all losers and scroungers... and post starts with 'Fact...'   

Edited by DayTrader
addition
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

8 hours ago, DayTrader said:

lol where do you find these memes?!

and yes, not too much of a generalisation on brexit voters at all...

all losers and scroungers... and post starts with 'Fact...'   

lol.. all laughs and banter..

I agree with you, the guy is generalising hardcore and this is v bad.. Care to check some demographic and social facts tho? Just for the sake of the discussion? Apologies if you know them just adding these to the thread 

https://academic.oup.com/economicpolicy/article/32/92/601/4459491

This is an academic article published by economists in "Economic Policy" an academic journal (I have heard this generalisation before for my lot, bad experts doing number crunching, lies and conspiracies to support a liberal view of things..). The paper (conference proceeding more correctly) has been cited 225 times by other sources.. I am sure it can be disputed anytime.

Anyway u might find some "facts" interesting or useful and they are not intended as patronising.. 

There is a clear correlation between education and voting preference.. I dont think this is just based on the liberal conspiracy.. Not all voters with a PhD (for example) are afflicted by conspiracy brainwash and certainly not many of them are wealthy so you cannot assign them perhaps to the "elite" at least in the UK were elite almost flatly means money..  

https://lordashcroftpolls.com/2019/03/a-reminder-of-how-britain-voted-in-the-eu-referendum-and-why/

"The AB social group were the only social group among whom a majority voted to remain (57%). C1s divided fairly evenly; nearly two thirds of C2DEs (64%) voted to leave the EU." 

"A majority (57%) of those with a university degree voted to remain, as did 64% of those with a higher degree and more than four in five (81%) of those still in full time education. Among those whose formal education ended at secondary school or earlier, a large majority voted to leave"

Could also care to add the news outlets and newspapers preferences of the different socioeconomic groups to see which group is more likely to be affected by strong-worded propaganda.. 

 

Edited by Alex Palamas
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

22 hours ago, Kit Moore said:

What I cannot affect are all the rules the EU hands down from on high, we cannot pick and choose what EU rules we follow.  Apologies if I was not clear.

I know that this is not blck or white, but EU legislations goes  through the European parliament and commission. You elect MEP directly and commission member are elected by sitting governments, so indirectly. Granted, it seems we voters have little influence, but personally I think that is partly because many do not engage in political processes and partly simpyl because it is a bigger democrazy. But hey, you can also have national laws made that you disagree with.  

Personally I am pro EU. This although I believe the EU is far from perfect. But I believe it can be developed into something good; something that will be the best answer to challenges that will face future generations. 

  • Great Response! 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alex, all good man, just didn't care for how it was worded

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see the UK do a hard exit from the EU and not pay that bunch of clowns for the opportunity to become a fully sovereign nation again.

There will likely be some 'bumps in the road', but a small price to pay to get your nation back.

I sincerely hope the US offers them any assistance required to ease the transition as the Special Relationship between our two nations is alive and well regardless of what you may see or read in the media.

  • Like 1
  • Great Response! 1
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Douglas Buckland said:

I would love to see the UK do a hard exit from the EU and not pay that bunch of clowns for the opportunity to become a fully sovereign nation again.

There will likely be some 'bumps in the road', but a small price to pay to get your nation back.

I sincerely hope the US offers them any assistance required to ease the transition as the Special Relationship between our two nations is alive and well regardless of what you may see or read in the media.

Doug,  

pls take a few mins to watch the video I posted above. It breaks things down extremely well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

pls take a few mins to watch the video I posted above. It breaks things down extremely well. 

Rasmus you are a true romantic just like me.. Not sure u could ever have an effect on the doors you are knocking.. 

"A wise man is a measure of all things, which exist. With a help of senses he measures perceptible things and with a help of reason he measures intellectual things" Democritus

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11 minutes ago, Rasmus Jorgensen said:

Doug,  

pls take a few mins to watch the video I posted above. It breaks things down extremely well. 

Watched it....still hope the UK leaves. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

18 minutes ago, Alex Palamas said:

Rasmus you are a true romantic just like me.. Not sure u could ever have an effect on the doors you are knocking.. 

Maybe. Atleast I am not having much luck on this forum. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

1 hour ago, Douglas Buckland said:

Watched it....still hope the UK leaves. 

Fair enough. And I am sure they will leave - the question is how? 

I respect if someone wants to leave for sentimental reasons (I know you're not Bristish, neither am I). I would even respect if someone would present a case that ment UK would benefit economically from leaving as long as case was based on facts. The reason I say benfit economically is because my impression is that leave argumentation was based almost exclusively on economics. 

Edited by Rasmus Jorgensen

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, they voted to leave, so more power to them.

That video had valid points, but it was soley focused on UK-EU, there is a global aspect as well.

 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When the European Union was formed, the United Kingdom opted out of the so-called Schengen Area (in which no passport clearance was required to cross borders casually). That worked until it didn't. 

When mass immigration into countries of the European Union went parabolic, there was literally no way for many of those countries in the Schengen Area to control their borders. England could, but since they had already allowed in so many Muslims, and since the Muslim population didn't assimilate well into the typical class-conscious communities of England, especially London, well, there was a lot of pressure, shall we say, for the United Kingdom to get with the program. This was more harshly intimated than voiced, more an unspoken pain in the butt than a threat. 

And then Brussels began making more and more financial demands because England was the most successful. It must have reminded the Redcoats of the Tea Party in Boston Harbor--only in some form of perverse reverse. Taxes, taxes, taxes, always more taxes!

The UK was never a good fit for the European Union, because, well, they're not exactly European, are they? People from the US typically say they're going to Europe, when sometimes that means they're flying from New York City to London, and then back, but Europe is more a state of mind, and the UK is most certainly not of that mind. After spending centuries in an existential battle with various members of the European Union, trust was lacking from the get-go. The British were autonomous, more trusting of the US than their European cousins. 

Anyway, this new Prime Minister Boris Johnson is clearly going to bust out of the EU. There's going to be some pain on both sides. Germany, already in recession, is going to feel it the most. But France and Italy are going to feel it too. Though not part of the Schengen Area, the English always kept their own passports and were allowed to freely enter other countries in the EU. That will change: they will be subject to passport clearance. Higher taxes are going to be levied, mostly as a penalty toward a nonparticipating trading partner. The United Kingdom, for all its bravado, is going to be largely dependent on the United States and Canada for robust trade. The EU is going to try its best to choke its old spouse to death. There will be a variety of unforeseen consequences. I personally think there is a binary possibility: If the world has already entered into a global recession at the point they Brexit, it is going to be hard times and the US will need to recreate an airlift operation, which is easily doable. If the trade war is over, and the world economies are more optimistic, it is going to be a much less painful process. 

Color me skeptical but I think this separation from the EU was just part of the larger picture of nationalism that is encircling the globe. Germany did the EU a lot of harm by allowing compassionate immigration, though Ms. Merkel did it for the right reasons. Great Britain wanted to take their country back over again: It has for centuries been an insular population totally absorbed in the niceties of minding the gap. In the end, opting out of the Schengen Agreement wasn't enough; they wanted to opt out of the whole mess!

  • Like 1
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Gerry Maddoux said:

When the European Union was formed, the United Kingdom opted out of the so-called Schengen Area (in which no passport clearance was required to cross borders casually). That worked until it didn't. 

When mass immigration into countries of the European Union went parabolic, there was literally no way for many of those countries in the Schengen Area to control their borders. England could, but since they had already allowed in so many Muslims, and since the Muslim population didn't assimilate well into the typical class-conscious communities of England, especially London, well, there was a lot of pressure, shall we say, for the United Kingdom to get with the program. This was more harshly intimated than voiced, more an unspoken pain in the butt than a threat. 

And then Brussels began making more and more financial demands because England was the most successful. It must have reminded the Redcoats of the Tea Party in Boston Harbor--only in some form of perverse reverse. Taxes, taxes, taxes, always more taxes!

The UK was never a good fit for the European Union, because, well, they're not exactly European, are they? People from the US typically say they're going to Europe, when sometimes that means they're flying from New York City to London, and then back, but Europe is more a state of mind, and the UK is most certainly not of that mind. After spending centuries in an existential battle with various members of the European Union, trust was lacking from the get-go. The British were autonomous, more trusting of the US than their European cousins. 

Anyway, this new Prime Minister Boris Johnson is clearly going to bust out of the EU. There's going to be some pain on both sides. Germany, already in recession, is going to feel it the most. But France and Italy are going to feel it too. Though not part of the Schengen Area, the English always kept their own passports and were allowed to freely enter other countries in the EU. That will change: they will be subject to passport clearance. Higher taxes are going to be levied, mostly as a penalty toward a nonparticipating trading partner. The United Kingdom, for all its bravado, is going to be largely dependent on the United States and Canada for robust trade. The EU is going to try its best to choke its old spouse to death. There will be a variety of unforeseen consequences. I personally think there is a binary possibility: If the world has already entered into a global recession at the point they Brexit, it is going to be hard times and the US will need to recreate an airlift operation, which is easily doable. If the trade war is over, and the world economies are more optimistic, it is going to be a much less painful process. 

Color me skeptical but I think this separation from the EU was just part of the larger picture of nationalism that is encircling the globe. Germany did the EU a lot of harm by allowing compassionate immigration, though Ms. Merkel did it for the right reasons. Great Britain wanted to take their country back over again: It has for centuries been an insular population totally absorbed in the niceties of minding the gap. In the end, opting out of the Schengen Agreement wasn't enough; they wanted to opt out of the whole mess!

Very well said.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

6 hours ago, Gerry Maddoux said:

When the European Union was formed, the United Kingdom opted out of the so-called Schengen Area (in which no passport clearance was required to cross borders casually). That worked until it didn't. 

When mass immigration into countries of the European Union went parabolic, there was literally no way for many of those countries in the Schengen Area to control their borders. England could, but since they had already allowed in so many Muslims, and since the Muslim population didn't assimilate well into the typical class-conscious communities of England, especially London, well, there was a lot of pressure, shall we say, for the United Kingdom to get with the program. This was more harshly intimated than voiced, more an unspoken pain in the butt than a threat. 

And then Brussels began making more and more financial demands because England was the most successful. It must have reminded the Redcoats of the Tea Party in Boston Harbor--only in some form of perverse reverse. Taxes, taxes, taxes, always more taxes!

The UK was never a good fit for the European Union, because, well, they're not exactly European, are they? People from the US typically say they're going to Europe, when sometimes that means they're flying from New York City to London, and then back, but Europe is more a state of mind, and the UK is most certainly not of that mind. After spending centuries in an existential battle with various members of the European Union, trust was lacking from the get-go. The British were autonomous, more trusting of the US than their European cousins. 

Anyway, this new Prime Minister Boris Johnson is clearly going to bust out of the EU. There's going to be some pain on both sides. Germany, already in recession, is going to feel it the most. But France and Italy are going to feel it too. Though not part of the Schengen Area, the English always kept their own passports and were allowed to freely enter other countries in the EU. That will change: they will be subject to passport clearance. Higher taxes are going to be levied, mostly as a penalty toward a nonparticipating trading partner. The United Kingdom, for all its bravado, is going to be largely dependent on the United States and Canada for robust trade. The EU is going to try its best to choke its old spouse to death. There will be a variety of unforeseen consequences. I personally think there is a binary possibility: If the world has already entered into a global recession at the point they Brexit, it is going to be hard times and the US will need to recreate an airlift operation, which is easily doable. If the trade war is over, and the world economies are more optimistic, it is going to be a much less painful process. 

Color me skeptical but I think this separation from the EU was just part of the larger picture of nationalism that is encircling the globe. Germany did the EU a lot of harm by allowing compassionate immigration, though Ms. Merkel did it for the right reasons. Great Britain wanted to take their country back over again: It has for centuries been an insular population totally absorbed in the niceties of minding the gap. In the end, opting out of the Schengen Agreement wasn't enough; they wanted to opt out of the whole mess!

Thank the lord for that 9 mile mote the UK has, I would consider filling that tunnel in as well.(or at least one side thats heading in the opposite direction)

Screen Shot 2019-08-24 at 04.35.12.png

Edited by James Regan
  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To put my comments in context. I come from Stoke on Trent, the heart of white working class anti EU feeling in the UK. People there are more heavily dependent on welfare, local government housing projects, state provided pensions in old age, state provided childcare etc. than in almost all other cities in the UK.  However, most of them  vote for conservative politicians that are pledged to cut welfare because the same politicians also talk very tough on race, immigration, asylum seekers, Islamisation etc.

I spend time with these people at soccer matches and when I travel back home from London to visit family and I promise you, I'm not lying or exaggerating. They would rather blame Muslims or EU citizens for their poverty rather than look inwardly and think that I should be better educated, be prepared to work harder, be smarter, apply for a promotion, take on some responsibility etc. It is always very easy to look for someone else to blame.

I appreciate people voted leave for a whole host of reasons and not all those who voted leave are racists

but all racists voted leave (that's if they could be bothered to take the exercise and leave the housing project for once in their lives and walk to the voting station.)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry- I must correct myself, I do know one hard core racist who supports the same soccer team as I, (Stoke City) and voted to remain in the EU.

However, he is pretty much off the scale where racism and right wing politics is concerned. He hopes that one day the EU split and the UK would become part of a North European Aryan super state encompassing Germany, Norway, Denmark etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/22/2019 at 9:23 PM, Nick Lilley said:

So Kit you "have a high IQ (tested)". How insecure must you be to get your IQ tested?.

Fact- Brexit voters are on average (now there will be millions of exceptions like your self, Boris, Jacob etc)

Less well educated

Less likely to own their own homes and live on council estates (that means living on projects for you in the US),

Less likely to be medium /high earners and more likely to be on benefits (welfare)

Less likely to be in good health and more likely to use the National Health Service

Less likely to send their children to private schools and more likely to use state schools

More likely to have criminal records, drink or drug problems and be racist, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, homophobic-

Until recently they would have been anti-Semitic as well but amongst uber UK patriots, Jews are now considered pretty cool because they now see Israel as an ally of the Christian world.

So if you wish to ally yourself with this unpleasant bunch of losers and scoungers that's your choice but most people with brains voted Remain.,

 

On 8/23/2019 at 7:30 AM, Tom Kirkman said:

Moderator note: probably a good idea to be careful with generalizations of people who disagree with you.  Sounds like another "basket of deplorables" dismissal of opposing viewpoints.

Good-natured, humorous mocking is something I do frequently (although I tend to be easily amused by absurdities, so I'm a poor example).

But generally running down and disparaging anyone who chooses to have a different viewpoint is probably not going to win anyone over to one's side, or coax anyone to be willing to consider different viewpoints.

A bit of humor goes much farther than a pint of piss and vinegar.

 

8r6o.jpg

 

1 hour ago, Nick Lilley said:

To put my comments in context. I come from Stoke on Trent, the heart of white working class anti EU feeling in the UK. People there are more heavily dependent on welfare, local government housing projects, state provided pensions in old age, state provided childcare etc. than in almost all other cities in the UK.  However, most of them  vote for conservative politicians that are pledged to cut welfare because the same politicians also talk very tough on race, immigration, asylum seekers, Islamisation etc.

I spend time with these people at soccer matches and when I travel back home from London to visit family and I promise you, I'm not lying or exaggerating. They would rather blame Muslims or EU citizens for their poverty rather than look inwardly and think that I should be better educated, be prepared to work harder, be smarter, apply for a promotion, take on some responsibility etc. It is always very easy to look for someone else to blame.

I appreciate people voted leave for a whole host of reasons and not all those who voted leave are racists

but all racists voted leave (that's if they could be bothered to take the exercise and leave the housing project for once in their lives and walk to the voting station.)

@Nick Lilley  this is my 2nd warning to you in this thread.

Knock off trying to paint everyone who disgrees with your views on Brexit as racist, uneducated idiots.

You are entitled to your opinions, but you are not entitled to repeatedly smear half of the UK as racist jerks simply because they don't agree with your views.

 

  • Great Response! 1
  • Haha 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Nick Lilley said:

To put my comments in context. I come from Stoke on Trent, the heart of white working class anti EU feeling in the UK. People there are more heavily dependent on welfare, local government housing projects, state provided pensions in old age, state provided childcare etc. than in almost all other cities in the UK.  However, most of them  vote for conservative politicians that are pledged to cut welfare because the same politicians also talk very tough on race, immigration, asylum seekers, Islamisation etc.

I spend time with these people at soccer matches and when I travel back home from London to visit family and I promise you, I'm not lying or exaggerating. They would rather blame Muslims or EU citizens for their poverty rather than look inwardly and think that I should be better educated, be prepared to work harder, be smarter, apply for a promotion, take on some responsibility etc. It is always very easy to look for someone else to blame.

I appreciate people voted leave for a whole host of reasons and not all those who voted leave are racists

but all racists voted leave (that's if they could be bothered to take the exercise and leave the housing project for once in their lives and walk to the voting station.)

You seem to be insinuating that those that voted to leave are somehow less intelligent than the faction that was too lazy to vote 'stay'.

I think that you may have a problem proving that assumption.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

(edited)

On 8/22/2019 at 11:51 PM, Alex Palamas said:

Kshithij I think you could perhaps study a little bit further the UK social stratification.. First, I guess it is hard to dispute (happy tho) that the Brexit social fraction is far more fanaticised, aggressive, rude, abrasive, sometimes you might call certain supporters thuggish, not all just some.. If you don't believe me why don't you try to check (easy to do) the exact numbers of millions (around 6mil, not including the exact online stats - hardcore underestimation here) that read the most popular newspapers in UK, The Sun and The Daily Mail? Have u perhaps noted the quality, tone and approach towards Brexit from these media? Would you say that they are mildly written, polite and elegant? What kind of people do you think read these? Or perhaps u think this is all laughs and banter (another typical feature of the Panem et circuses society..)? 

Nevertheless, these simple people u talk about, the compact majority, the lumpen maybe, the ruled masses are pushed yes, totally agree with you, but not sure who pushes them.. Not sure the average doctor, scientist, nurse, engineer or student pushes the unfortunate little man of Britain.. If the little person knew what is going on would have perhaps revolted (not sure if UK people would truly revolt given their extreme and compulsive trust to their populist Rulers).. Plus do u really standby your statement that going for a March is a matter of affording it, while just look the endless masses of people flocking in football stadia or running amok in pubs and parks when teams win a trophy??..

Totally agree with u tho, UK needs to come out of EU, damage is done, too much damage, we all need to collect our bits and move on..

 

My observation in life says that people who talk directly are more or less better people whereas people who impose artificial politeness tend to act as backstabbers and cowards during time of need. So, given a choice, I would go with the people who talk directly as I would be more familiar with their intentions due to their direct talk. People who talk politely almost always hold some ulterior motives.

The poor people are most affected when additional people are brought in as substitute for them. The rich people have enough already and small reduction would not matter much. The ones to blame are not doctors, engineers but the government which has deliberately intervened to make most important commodities like food cheaper than unimportant commodities like mobile phones and capital intensive goods. Mind you that these capital intensive goods are a result of government funding, not some private genius doing everything single handed. So, it is rather unfair that the government investment gives unfair dividend by creating inequality. If one creates more problem by simply bringing in less qualified people without reason in the name of EU solidarity, the poor will be worst affected. It is quite reasonable demand from poor to ask for quitting such a system. 

Yes, it is a fact that organising of people takes resources. People may form random crowd on their own but if there has to be coordinated march/parade, then there has to be funding. People will not simply march without being properly tutored to do so and such tutoring requires resources. Only other way of getting people to come out is through espousing a cause and calling out those in powers as traitors. But such actions can result in uncontrolled anger and riots.

6 hours ago, Nick Lilley said:

To put my comments in context. I come from Stoke on Trent, the heart of white working class anti EU feeling in the UK. People there are more heavily dependent on welfare, local government housing projects, state provided pensions in old age, state provided childcare etc. than in almost all other cities in the UK.  However, most of them  vote for conservative politicians that are pledged to cut welfare because the same politicians also talk very tough on race, immigration, asylum seekers, Islamisation etc.

I spend time with these people at soccer matches and when I travel back home from London to visit family and I promise you, I'm not lying or exaggerating. They would rather blame Muslims or EU citizens for their poverty rather than look inwardly and think that I should be better educated, be prepared to work harder, be smarter, apply for a promotion, take on some responsibility etc. It is always very easy to look for someone else to blame.

I appreciate people voted leave for a whole host of reasons and not all those who voted leave are racists

but all racists voted leave (that's if they could be bothered to take the exercise and leave the housing project for once in their lives and walk to the voting station.)

I don't think you understand how Economy works. There are requirement for division of labour. It just happens that certain set of labour gets paid more due to more skill required and also due to political reasons, mainly to sell overpriced technology goods to less developed countries by taking advantage of the other countries' lack of technology base. But this doesn't mean that everyone should get educated as that will simply mean that the educated people will then have to do construction labour, farming etc. It will simply lead to waste of time to study for 10 years only to end up becoming a farmer or construction labourer as there was demand for jobs there! People need food and labour too, after all.

As a result of this requirement for division of labour and political bias towards technological jobs, there is a need for many people to work in places which doesn't need education and government intervention to set the political bias right.

Edited by kshithij Sharma
Forgot to reply to one of the two quoted comments
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/22/2019 at 6:22 AM, DocManfred said:

If the UK would stay in the EU this would cause financial losses for the ultrarich in UK, which have avoided to pay their fair taxes to the benefit of the middle class and the poor so far.

What pray tell, is the obligatory minimum "fair tax" owed by the rich "to the benefit" of the middle class and the poor? 

I'm rich, you're poor, so I "owe" you money? 

Communist, much? Or is this still called socialist rather than that old fashioned word, theft? 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

On 8/22/2019 at 6:23 AM, Nick Lilley said:

So Kit you "have a high IQ (tested)". How insecure must you be to get your IQ tested?.

Fact- Brexit voters are on average (now there will be millions of exceptions like your self, Boris, Jacob etc)

Less well educated

Less likely to own their own homes and live on council estates (that means living on projects for you in the US),

Less likely to be medium /high earners and more likely to be on benefits (welfare)

Less likely to be in good health and more likely to use the National Health Service

Less likely to send their children to private schools and more likely to use state schools

More likely to have criminal records, drink or drug problems and be racist, xenophobic, Islamaphobic, homophobic-

Until recently they would have been anti-Semitic as well but amongst uber UK patriots, Jews are now considered pretty cool because they now see Israel as an ally of the Christian world.

So if you wish to ally yourself with this unpleasant bunch of losers and scoungers that's your choice but most people with brains voted Remain.,

You have legitimate data that supports these contentions? Opinion pieces don't count, nor does "exit polling" that interviewed 12 people in one pub on the Guardian's expense tab   

  • Great Response! 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

21 minutes ago, Ward Smith said:

Opinion pieces don't count, nor does "exit polling" that interviewed 12 people in one pub on the Guardian's expense tab   

Or your buddies at a football game, the cream of our English intellect no doubt

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

See the 1 minute video below of the EU President, to understand more clearly why the UK wants to get away from the stifling, unreasonable EU bureaucracy.  Agreed with the title of the article, "arrogance" is an apt description of the contemptuous EU attitude toward the UK on display here.

 

The Unmitigated Arrogance of EU President Donald Tusk Toward Brexit

Posted by sundance

Against the backdrop of British Prime Minister Boris Johnson arriving for the G7 summit in Biarritz, France, EU President Donald Tusk holds a press conference to announce the EU will work to block Britains’ exit from the collective, and will not accept terms.

The hubris and arrogance within this declaration, in advance of Johnson’s arrival, is exhibit ‘A’ for exactly the reason British citizens want out of this nonsense. Watch:

 

The likelihood of Boris Johnson and Donald Trump forming an alliance against this insufferable EU collective is beginning to show in the relationships.

 

donald-tusk-5.jpg?w=584

There is a strong likelihood PM Johnson and President Trump will form a mutually beneficial economic and trade alliance outside the EU. The euroweanies know this could be devastating to their controlled economic system; their economy is already in trouble.

This will not end well for the EU.  Pride cometh before the fall.

What Trump and Johnson could construct is a bilateral trade deal between the U.S. and the U.K that has genuine reciprocity and negligible trade barriers.  Like a trade freeway between the U.K and the U.S, but only between the U.K. and U.S.

With the EU no longer able to influence trade agreements involving the U.K. European companies, and countries (Poland, Hungary etc.) could get tariff-free access to the U.S. market by operating out of Britain, or using transnational shipping through Britain.

Simultaneously, the U.S. could ship tariff free into the EU (to a receiving EU corporation, or EU subsidiary of a U.S. corporation) by exporting to Britain.  The UK would be the hub for massive economic activity between North America and Europe.

If France (the EU) is charging Canada a high duty for imported Canadian cheese; Canada, through the USMCA pact could ship to a holding company in Britain who would then transfer product (duty free) to the receiving French company who is operating in the U.K, and distributing in France.  [A French company in the U.K. would receive in the U.K without the French (EU) duty.]

Eventually all corporations in the EU, who wanted to do business with North America, would start operations in the U.K….. OR, the EU would have to drop it’s one-way tariff policy (ie. the Marshall plan is ended).  Think about the leverage this creates.

Of course this process would completely change the trade dynamic in Europe; and completely change the trade dynamic between Europe and North America.  So how would Trump and Johnson start?  Answer: Establish an interim tripwire to measure success. Hence you get this phrase:

 “[…] Such a deal could last for something like six months, the official told reporters.”…

Of course an interim deal… because the EU bloc will respond to it… so a reevaluation at six months, prior to any massive investment outlays, is exactly what a CEO would create.

Donald Trump isn’t a politician, he’s working through a plan for what he views (we agree) is bigger than any ideological aspects.  “Economic Security is National Security.”

During the G7 nuance look for the manipulative globalists to try and keep President Trump and Boris Johnson apart during the non-scripted gatherings and assemblies.

The EU does not want the optics of President Trump and Prime Minister Boris Johnson broadcast to the world.   Watch how hard it will be to find pictures of them together.

g7-france-8-boris-johnson.jpg?w=584

 
 
  • Like 1
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.